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Author Topic: Modelling Power Tool advice  (Read 5637 times)

Online Midaski

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Modelling Power Tool advice
« on: May 31, 2006, 10:04:45 PM »
I've been considering buying a small drill with accessories - probably a Dremel.

The latest reason is a follow on from Bigrin's magnetic basing thread and Workshop article, where I think he uses a drill to make room for the small magnet in a slotted base for a metal mini.

There are also various other uses such as cutting and smoothing, etc.

Having searched the web for sites I am confronted with quite an array of different models.

Anyone have any recommendations as to what I should look for in the way of specification and accessories?
Quote from: Gneisenau
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Metal to Finecast - It is mostly a swap of medium. 

You mean they will be using Ouija boards instead of Tarot cards for their business plans from now on?

Offline Grutch

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2006, 10:29:35 PM »
A Dremel is a wise choice!

Some other tools I use are these. Mostly for terrain and basing though.

  Airbrush I have a gravity feed airbrush that comes in handy for all sorts of things such as terrain and large bases.  I use it with a C02 Tank which works perfect, I'd advise against compressers. 

  Jigsaw  I believe I spent about $50 USDollars for my Sears Craftsman Jigsaw,  it has a laser guide,  and the blade can be rotated 360 degrees.  This comes in very handy when working on terrain projects,  either for cutting dense blocks of foam or pieces of wood for buildings.
 
  Hotwire Foam cutters  I recommend a good foam cutter, as well as a hot foam etching stick shaped like a pen. 

-Grutch

Offline Teuton

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2006, 01:13:19 AM »
I bought a Super Works rotary tool for about $40 AU and it's worked alright for me.
That company only appears to operate in Australia, so the advice is probably no good to you.

As for accessories, I find the flexible shaft attatchment to be very useful.

  Hotwire Foam cutters  I recommend a good foam cutter, as well as a hot foam etching stick shaped like a pen. 

Foam cutters are awesome, but why buy one when you can make your own?
I made one about seven or eight years ago when I was starting out, and it still works just fine.
All you need is a frame, (I made one out of wooden offcuts) a battery, a nichrome wire heating element and some electrical bits to make your own.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2006, 06:21:02 AM by Teuton »

Offline Lost Zoat

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2006, 03:09:52 AM »
I have used two.  One battery powered and on hard wired.  I like the hard wired best.  It is a dremel and came with a lot of accessories.  I mainly use mine for drilling hole for pinning conversions, or making holes for my home made spears.  I really don't use any of the other accessories that it came with.
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Offline Tyra_Nid

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2006, 05:58:27 AM »
I've got a cheapy Rotary tool as well- about half the price of a Dremel, and came with more stuff (including a 'Flex Shaft', which sounds kind of dirty).

I dont think you really need to buy a 'branded' Dremel unless you are planning to use it A LOT, in which case an actual one might last longer or something... but thats just pulling stuff out of my arse, i dont know really.

You can always buy 'proper' Dremel accessories for it too, if needs be!

I made one about seven or eight years ago when I was starting out, and it still works just fine.

This is very true... but for me, the time and effort and parts and cognitive resources required to construct one far outweighs the costs of actually buying one. However, if you have the parts/knowledge at hand, it is a good idea.

Offline General Helstrom

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2006, 07:51:36 AM »
I think you'll mainly want to look at adjustable speed and plenty of sanding and grinding accessories (actual drilling, as done for pins, is still better done with a pin vice drill IMO). Adjustable speed will allow you to work clean and safe on both plastic and metal - I have a "bargain bin" rotary tool with only one speed, and I need to be very careful not to destroy plastic models when working on them.

Grinding bits ( in particluar the ones with a little globe-shaped grinder on top of the stick) are probably the best for use on minis as they offer a great deal of control - some of those bits are positively tiny and you could probably use them to engrave decoration on models if you were skilled enough :lol:

Make sure it has a common vice grip so you can use bits from different brands etc.
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Offline BAWTRM

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2006, 07:52:49 AM »
The one really consistent piece of advice I see people getting, when they ask about a rotary tool, is to buy a hardwired one and not a battery powered one.

General Helstrom has some good advice about the bitz you want.
"...granted it isn't as retarded as having a lady popping out of your head holding a cup while humping a boar with a sword through its back, but there can only be one Brettonia."

PhillyT

Offline Tyra_Nid

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2006, 08:46:23 AM »
The one really consistent piece of advice I see people getting, when they ask about a rotary tool, is to buy a hardwired one and not a battery powered one.

I was tempted to get a wireless, but cost-effectiveness won out.
Why is wired better?

Offline BAWTRM

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2006, 09:07:53 AM »
Dependable continuous supply of power is a great plus. What's the chance that you'll be using your rotary tool somewhere not near a socket? Bloody unlikely I tell you.

There's no greater frustration than having to stop working because you need to charge the battery again.
"...granted it isn't as retarded as having a lady popping out of your head holding a cup while humping a boar with a sword through its back, but there can only be one Brettonia."

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Online Midaski

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2006, 09:19:55 AM »
Ok guys thanks for the help so far - wired does sound best, as I do have a 'workbench' with sockets close by.

The other questions are:

How powerful does the drill need to be? I take the point about varying speed.
I see lots of uses on the dremel sites, but our sort of hobby is generally fairly light work I would think, so is more power just 'toys for the boys'?

Then also there are the accessories kits - they look more of a bargain if you buy them with the drill as a package deal, but are you getting loads of bits you may not need?
I see some of you have mentioned some useful bits - is that the extent of the ones used?
I have 'persuaded' the family en masse to contribute for my upcoming 29th birthday, so with about 5 people chipping in 10 and me topping up if necessary I have potentially a reasonable budget if it is actually required.

What I probably need are some comments from our 'heavy' converters or sculptors. Do you use a drill a lot?
Quote from: Gneisenau
Quote
Metal to Finecast - It is mostly a swap of medium. 

You mean they will be using Ouija boards instead of Tarot cards for their business plans from now on?

Offline jack

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2006, 10:31:35 AM »
   Midaski ,you will be surprised how often you will use a Dremel for non hobby projects.

  A flex-shaft is a great aid as is the device that allows you to dial in the exact RPM you want.

  I have a Dremel ,but almost any good name brand will suffice[can't ,however, vouch for universality of accessories,but I don't imagine it to be an issue].
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Offline wisenheimer

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2006, 02:15:01 PM »
It really helps to have a large assortment of bits and collets.

My favorite bits, or the ones I tend to reach for the most...

For removing mold lines from both metal and plastic.
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188537&G=66239&I=66295

Nice for cleaning out head and arm holes and generally removing large amounts of metal.
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188537&G=66237&I=66260

Nice for drilling into plastic and metal, but great for boring out guns.
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188537&G=66238&I=66282
And
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188537&G=66238&I=66281

For removing mold lines in metal
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188558&G=66333&I=66347
And
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188558&G=66321&I=66323

Restoring the shine and removing scratches left by the other bits
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188544&G=66377&I=66379

Fuzzy-Be-Gone - quickly removes fuzzy edges left by filing.
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188544&G=66994&I=66398

Cutting
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-detail.htm?H=188549&G=66367&I=66368
And
http://www.dremel.com/en-us/attachments-and-accessories/attachment-accessory-group.htm?H=188549&G=66365 (I originally bought it to cut some mdf but I'm surprised by how many uses I've found for this thing.)

I'm not master converter, but I can clean and prep a unit of 20 metal models very quickly with these bits.

The corded models give you more power, variable speeds, and reliable performance. The cordless model allows you to sit in front of the TV during a hockey game and clean some minis. My personal preference is for both.

Online Midaski

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2006, 06:04:17 PM »
Thanks wisenheimer  - that is really helpful.
Quote from: Gneisenau
Quote
Metal to Finecast - It is mostly a swap of medium. 

You mean they will be using Ouija boards instead of Tarot cards for their business plans from now on?

Offline queek

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2006, 07:14:57 PM »
just remember the Golden Rule when using a rotary tool:

always, ALWAYS, ALWAYS    use safety glasses or other eye protection!  Having a drill bit break off and go flying is not A Good Thing, when there is a fragile sensory organ in the flilght path.   Not to mention metal bits and the like. 

Offline Jon23516

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2006, 07:21:21 PM »
I've been considering buying a small drill with accessories - probably a Dremel.

I was given a Dremel a couple years back but have not used it yet. It came as one of the "deluxe" kits with a couple dozen bit heads as well as the previously mentioned "flex-shaft". My Dremel is both corded and has the variable RPM controls.

I have been reluctant to use it for two reasons: 1) it has been ingrained in me to use the correct tool for the job and I have not taken the time to figure out what all the different bit heads are used for (wood, metal, plastic, etc.) and 2) even at its lowest setting, I'm afraid to use a drillbit on either plastic or metal minis as I could see crazy things going wrong.

Yes, and the whole drill bit in the eye thing...

I definately want to use it when I make the time to work on terrain more extensively.

Good luck,
Jon
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Offline queek

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2006, 07:33:02 PM »
safety glasses can be purchased for $2-$3 at any hardware store. 

Wear them,  and be careful. 

Offline Clarkarias

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2006, 07:35:49 PM »
My mother got a dremel on sale at Sears for me (and more of a discount since she works there) and gave it to me for Christmas.  I have yet to use it on anything big but I think it's a great investment for anyone that's looking to do some serious conversions.
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Offline Hendrid

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2006, 09:48:44 PM »
A rotary power tool is very useful for lots of modelling jobs, Dremel is probably the best known, but pricey. Most of the Hardware store chains do their own brand version at around half the price and usually with extensive starter kits. These are just as good. Make sure it's variable speed, what ever you get.

Offline Pistol Pete

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2006, 12:33:34 AM »
The dremel is a fine tool but I almost never use mine for modeling.  My most used tools are my pin vise, exacto knife, files, toenail clippers, as an assortment of cutters and pliers.  For plastic this is pretty much all I've ever needed (and I do a *lot* of conversions!). 

I just got a jewelers saw as well.  I really prefer the jewelers saw for cutting lead mini's because it's much more precise than the dremel which tends to grab the piece and tear up the model, due to the extremely high speeds (even the low speeds are too fast for most miniature work IMOHO).  For the larger metal models I could see where the dremel would come into it's own.   

I will also stress again the importance of eye protection with the dremel.  In particular with wire wheels, grinding stones and cutoff discs, which all have a tenedency to shoot off at dangerously high speeds.  Cheapo knockoff tool bits are particularly prone to coming apart at high speeds (the Dremel brand stuff is much higher quality).
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Offline duckman

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2006, 05:46:36 AM »
I have a Dremel these days, it's bloody terrific, and good for a plethora of non-hobby uses. My original power tool was a no-names cheap thing, which didn't have variable speed and its accessories were not good (snapped drill bits in the eye sucks a LOT, particularly when you have to drive yourself to hospital at night), eventually I tossed it. Dremels are expensive compared to other brands, however I tend to go with the "get what you pay for" theory. They have a squillion accessories, and very good drill bits, polishers, grinders, cut-off wheels and so on.
If you're going to be doing extremely fine cutting work, use the jeweller's saw, as sawgunner101 says, even on low speeds you'll find they go too quick.
Summary:
wired power supply
variable speed
WEAR GOGGLES!!! I have a permanent "black spot" in my left eye due to not following this piece of advice....it is NOT cool.

cheers
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Online Midaski

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2006, 10:47:50 AM »
Thanks for all the advice - I have bought this one:

http://www.dremel-direct.com/acatalog/300_Series___55_Accessories_and_Case.html

with the special offer 110pc accessory kit as well.
I also got some goggles. :roll:

It arrived today, but I still have a problem ............

It is supposed to be a 29th birthday present, and my birthday is not unitl July 13th, ....... and certain members of the family are insisting that the box is still intact and unopened on the day.
 :cry:


NB. I cannot believe I got away with it in the earlier post, so I had to go for a second attempt.
 :wink:
Quote from: Gneisenau
Quote
Metal to Finecast - It is mostly a swap of medium. 

You mean they will be using Ouija boards instead of Tarot cards for their business plans from now on?

Offline jack

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2006, 09:28:00 PM »
29th Midaski? :wink:
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Offline xnet445

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2006, 11:09:42 AM »
29th Midaski? :wink:

Since the 20th, perhaps  :evil:
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Online Midaski

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #23 on: June 07, 2006, 08:19:08 PM »
Yes now - with some help you spot it ...........

....but I got away with it - unchallenged - on Page 1, 6 DAYS AGO!!!!!!
 :wink:

Ok so I dropped a decade  :wink:






or two
Quote from: Gneisenau
Quote
Metal to Finecast - It is mostly a swap of medium. 

You mean they will be using Ouija boards instead of Tarot cards for their business plans from now on?

Offline Alasandril

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Re: Modelling Power Tool advice
« Reply #24 on: June 07, 2006, 10:32:13 PM »
Was wondering why your profile said 54 yet you were claiming 29  :?

Didn't want to ask, me being a "new" guy when it comes to posting on the forums and all that.
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