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Author Topic: What literature are you reading?  (Read 19421 times)

Offline Warlord

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Re: What literature are you reading?
« Reply #675 on: October 25, 2019, 03:05:03 PM »
I just finished a really interesting book on the history of Venice from about 1200CE to it's fall to Napoleon in the 1800's. It's incredible some of the schemes and plans the merchant republics were doing. All vying against each other and everyone else.

I read something like that a while back. Very interesting read. The excommunication with Rome and poltics around that is pretty interesting too, from how the situation developed with the independant Patriarch in the first place. I would suggest also reading about Florence and the Medici’s would be right up your alley.
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Offline VonOttenheim

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  • Commander Black Griffon
Re: What literature are you reading?
« Reply #676 on: November 03, 2019, 06:52:11 AM »
"Ash: A Secret History" by Mary Gentle is an ok read.

As a 12-year old The Hobbit and later The Lord of the Rings triology opened the doors to a secret world, into which I could escape whenever, where ever just by opening a book. Silmarillion came later.

Earthsea cycle was a great experience when starting to explore the fantasy genre.

The Wheel of Time….the series that seems/seemed to go on forever…..I could never stop reading it...even it felt like the plot/s spiralled all over the place.

Magician-Riftwar…..

Icewind Dale triology…  (while playing the computer game...)

Ahhh   so many memories…  so many worlds to explore  :smile2:
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Offline Freman Bloodglaive

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Re: What literature are you reading?
« Reply #677 on: November 04, 2019, 10:43:29 AM »
At the moment I'm reading the Deathworlders online story.
It's actually pretty good.
"Reason is a thing of God, inasmuch as there is nothing which God the Maker of all has not provided, disposed, ordained by reason - nothing which He has not willed should be handled and understood by reason" Quintus Tertullian

Offline Feanor Fire Heart

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Re: What literature are you reading?
« Reply #678 on: November 05, 2019, 02:41:31 PM »
I finally read Fahrenheit 451. It was required reading in high school but I didn't read it. Go figure.
Reading it now with the gusto of wanting to read, just wow! It was a great story that I don't think my younger self would have appreciated.  Everyone likes to cite that its about book burning and censorship, but thats just what you get from reading the back of a book and maybe the bit of the beginning. Its about so much more than that! Dumbing down media for something thats easier to consume, keeping people happy/distracted at all times, growing apathy in society, and the dumb persecuting the intellectual because they feel inferior.  God this feels relevant today as I am sure it was back in the 50s when it was written.

I swear I work with someone that is just like Montag's wife.  :ph34r:
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Offline Artobans Ghost

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Re: What literature are you reading?
« Reply #679 on: November 24, 2019, 11:18:06 PM »
Finished the Solar Wars and The Lost and the Damned. First 2 (!) in the drive of terra, the last of the HH series. I liked the Lost better but both are really good. Won’t give it away but I thought this was the last book lol. The big fight is yet to come but the actual siege was awesome.
Now to wait for the big fight! Wonder how it will turn out ? 😸
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Offline Cèsar de Quart

  • Posts: 80
Re: What literature are you reading?
« Reply #680 on: December 20, 2019, 08:04:54 PM »
I finally read Fahrenheit 451. It was required reading in high school but I didn't read it. Go figure.
Reading it now with the gusto of wanting to read, just wow! It was a great story that I don't think my younger self would have appreciated.  Everyone likes to cite that its about book burning and censorship, but thats just what you get from reading the back of a book and maybe the bit of the beginning. Its about so much more than that! Dumbing down media for something thats easier to consume, keeping people happy/distracted at all times, growing apathy in society, and the dumb persecuting the intellectual because they feel inferior.  God this feels relevant today as I am sure it was back in the 50s when it was written.

I swear I work with someone that is just like Montag's wife.  :ph34r:

That's the problem with mandatory reads. On the one hand, sometimes you really get into a mandatory read you might not have come across with (That's how I came across the South American magical-realism writers). But you can also hit a wall with a book you're not ready to appreciate.

I'm in favour of directed reading. If the reading of a chapter comes with commentary and discussion, the book seeps into you even when you hadn't connected with it at first, and by the time you keep reading, the themes and ideas are already present in your mind. I've seen that even complex writing like Shakespeare, or difficult text because of the language, like Chaucer, are made enjoyable to teenagers if the reading and the debate go hand in hand.

Of course, your mileage may vary. All we did as children, in my case, was read the books and face a test at the end of the term.

As for good reads, I've read SPQR by Mary Beard. One of the most insightful and enjoyable works of historical divulge I've seen. If you're interested in Roman history, especially Republican, and it's not your first foray into the field (maybe you've read Rubicon by Tom Holland, or some well researched novel set in Ancient Rome, like Graves' "I, Claudius" or Lindsey Davis' crime stories, give SPQR a go, I think it's quite remarkable.

Mind you, it's not a "history" in the simplest sense, it's more of a rumination on how Roman history has been studied, and the change in perspectives in the last 30 years.