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Author Topic: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time  (Read 117958 times)

Offline Gneisenau

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2013, 09:14:25 AM »
This is fantastic! :::cheers::: Please keep it up.


Impressed

Should I be worried that I wanted to do the exact same joke?

I must admit, though, I am very much inclined to disregard the Storm of Chaos storyline.

The what?




:icon_wink:

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
« Reply #26 on: October 26, 2013, 12:06:23 PM »
Should I be worried that I wanted to do the exact same joke?

Ungulate minds think alike, I guess.

The what?


Nothing really - just a whisper in the wind....
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2013, 03:35:51 PM »
Added on previous page: Digression on the Imperial Menagerie.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2013, 09:28:52 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline patsy02

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2013, 04:55:25 PM »
Quote
Frederik Untermensch

Quote
Untermensch
I agree with the inhumane treatment of animals.

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2013, 05:05:13 PM »
Not my invention - you need to address GW for that.
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline BAWTRM

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #30 on: November 15, 2013, 12:39:31 PM »
Wow Fidelis, this is absolutely great! Empire political fluff has always been quite a patchwork affair, but you're turning it into one grand epic historic tale! :eusa_clap:
"...granted it isn't as retarded as having a lady popping out of your head holding a cup while humping a boar with a sword through its back, but there can only be one Brettonia."

PhillyT

Offline Commander Bernhardt

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #31 on: November 16, 2013, 01:24:38 PM »
yes this is grand.
when can we read the next installment?
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Offline Kirgan

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2013, 01:17:09 PM »
 :::cheers::: :::cheers::: :::cheers::: :happy:
Commission Painting-PM  :)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #33 on: November 17, 2013, 05:32:25 PM »
Thanks to all for the encouragement. Coming soon on this Forum: the War of Succession.
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
« Reply #34 on: November 20, 2013, 01:22:36 PM »
The War of Succession

Note: Although ill-suited for the events it is supposed to designate, the name has been in general use since the primary source “Das erste Buch der Chronik des Kaysers Wilhem des Dritten” (the First Book of the Chronicle of Emperor Wilhelm III) which will be followed here as well.

The Westerland campaign had lasted a little over a month, and the Imperial summons against Dieter IV had received no response. Nuln and Stirland had reported that Dieter IV had sought refuge there, which had been refused. Since then, there had been no word of the deposed Emperor. Upon his return, Wilhelm III called therefore an Imperial Diet to try the former Emperor for non-compliance and insubordination.

However, the trial did not exactly get off to a smooth start. Since the campaign, relations between Wilhelm and Frederik of Talabecland had been decidedly frosty, but now the latter’s simmering resentment erupted like a volcano. When the indictment against Dieter IV was read, Frederik rose from his seat and started to hurl angry accusations against the Emperor. If Dieter was to be tried, so should Wilhelm! Dieter had betrayed the Empire out of greed, but Wilhelm out of spite. If only he, Frederik, had been supported, he could have regained Marienburg.  But Wilhelm, envious of his success, had deliberately failed to come to his aid, and such conduct was unfit and unworthy of an Emperor.

1. Frederik of Talabecland accusing Wilhelm III



This outburst was greeted with shocked silence. Then Wilhelm, pale but calm, answered. Frederik had disobeyed clear and direct orders, jeopardising the whole mission. In addition, he had not informed the command of his change of plans in a timely fashion. In any case, the main force would be unable to provide any real support. Siert had not fallen. Yes, they could have marched to Marienburg, with an enemy in their rear, but then what? With no siege equipment and no fleet, how could the pressure on the Empire forces in the Kasteel have been relieved? The worst thing of all: Frederik’s idea was quite ingenious and with proper preparation well worth pursuing, but Frederik’s rash actions just had served to alert Marienburg to this danger.

The calm answer and the obvious agreement of the Imperial Diet enraged Frederik even more. As the Grand Duke rushed forward, the Imperial Champion interpreted this as an attack, and Frederik’s life might have ended there, if others had not intervened and pulled him back. Furious and humiliated, Frederik immediately left the Court for Talabheim.

2. The intervention of the Imperial Champion



After a short recess, in which Frederik’s outburst was hotly debated, the Imperial Diet continued, but the trial of Dieter IV now proved something of an anticlimax. Unsurprisingly, the deposed Emperor was convicted in absentia of insubordination and non-compliance with the Imperial Summons, and his remaining fiefs and titles withdrawn.

To avoid a vacuum of authority in Stirland and improve his own power base, Wilhelm III immediately granted the County of Stirland to Ulrich Haupt-Anderssen, one of his staunchest supporters.

3. The investiture of Ulrich Haupt-Anderssen as Elector Count of Stirland




1. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 379 (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
2-3. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS 134, fol 73 and 16 (ca. 1500), Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 01:07:18 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (20/11)
« Reply #35 on: November 29, 2013, 08:30:22 PM »
In order not to escalate the situation, Wilhelm III decided not to take measures against Frederik for his behaviour and declared the Imperial Diet closed.


1. Wilhelm III and the Electors leaving the Volkshalle after the Imperial Diet.
 


The Elector Counts had barely returned home, or the Grand Duke of Talabecland landed another bombshell. A month after the Imperial Diet, Talabec heralds appeared simultaneously in Altdorf and all the provincial capitals, declaring the disposition of Dieter IV illegal and thus null and void. Furthermore, they announced that Frederik had given the true Emperor shelter in Talabheim, and taken up his rightful cause against the usurper in Altdorf, against whom an Imperial ban was pronounced. To execute the ban and to restore order, Dieter IV had appointed Frederik as vicarius Imperii with plenipotentiary powers. As such, the Grand Duke called an Imperial Diet to take place in Talabheim within three weeks.

Frederik knew that he would not rally much support in this way. In Stirland, the the Krieglitz family, still powerful, opposed Ulrich Haupt-Andersen, but less in support of Dieter IV than their family’s claims to the Duchy. Elsewhere his message fell on deaf ears, even with those that had supported him in the election. But the main purpose of the declaration was to provide a juridical excuse for another daring action. Some days before the Talabec heralds came to Altdorf, a small Talabec force already infiltrated Altdorf. Together with the heralds, Frederik himself arrived in secret to take charge of the operation which would be launched in the early hours of the next morning. The aim:  to capture the three men which were the biggest obstacle to his plans: Wilhelm III, the Grand Theogonist, and Johann of Nuln, the Arch-Chancellor. 

2. The Talabec heralds at the court Wilhelm III in Altdorf .



Note in the upper right hand corner the Frederik Untermensch and his small force about to infiltrate Altdorf.

The operation ended in total disaster.

The group sent to the Cathedral failed to detain the Grand Theogonist. Even worse: during the search of the Cathedral, they accidently set fire, which quickly spread. The Great Cathedral of Altdorf was set ablaze! 

3. The Grand Cathedral burning.



The illumination is not from The First Book of the Chronicle of Emperor Wilhelm III, but from the propagandist The Fall of the Stirland Dynasty. Note the men with torches. The artist seems to imply that the burning down of the Cathedral happened on purpose. In the foreground the attack on the Palace. The number of attackers is highly exaggerated.

The main Talabec force commanded by Frederik himself attacked the Palace and managed to force its way to the palace square.
 
4. The attack on the Palace in Altdorf.




Just as Wilhelm III and success seemed within reach, Frederik was struck by lightning and fell lifeless to the ground! As his men saw their leader apparently dead, the attack collapsed. The Talabecers fled back to Talabheim, taking Frederik’s body with them. 

5. Frederik Untermensch struck down by lightning.



Note on the right hand side Wilhelm III. The artist has also depicted Frederik already brought back to Talabheim and being treated by doctors. Popular opinion (and Reikland propaganda) soon interpreted this event as divine punishment for the destruction of the Cathedral. However, the chronology is unclear, and the fire may have been set, after Frederik had been struck. More sceptic historians have rejected the story altogether as Reikland propaganda or a fanciful interpretation of what would have been no more than a heart attack. However, eyewitness accounts from both sides confirm the event.




1-2. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS 134, fol. 56 and 19 (ca. 1500), Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague.
3. Flavius Josèphe, Les Antiquités Judaiques,  fol. 213v. (ca. 1470) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
4-5. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 216r and 1v (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 01:36:26 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Commander Bernhardt

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/11)
« Reply #36 on: December 01, 2013, 12:51:21 PM »
good stuff  :happy:
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/11)
« Reply #37 on: December 08, 2013, 03:52:01 PM »
Cinders of the blazing Cathedral had already set some neighbouring buildings alight. Therefore, Wilhelm III did not immediately pursue the fleeing enemy, sending only a scouting force to track their movements. Instead, he concentrated on extinguishing the fires, lest it spread to the palace and the entire city of Altdorf.  Once that was accomplished and the city was safe, he assembled his troops and set out for Talabheim. Marching along the Talabec river. He also instructed the Elector Counts to converge on Talabheim with all available forces. 

1. The Imperial Army on the march!



As they entered Talabecland, the Imperial forces did not meet any resistance. The insurrection of the Grand Duke had not been popular and the events at Altdorf were also in Talabecland seen as divine punishment. About midway, the Emperor was met by Talabec emissaries, offering unconditional surrender. All Talabec cities, including Talabheim, would open their gates to the Imperial forces. They also revealed that Grand Duke Frederik was still alive, but partially paralysed and incapable of speech, let alone of leading his army. As Wilhelm, wary of any new surprises, cautiously approached Talabheim, the gates opened and the Talabheim high nobility and City Counsel emerged to offer him the keys to the city. 

2. Wilhelm III meeting the Talabec emissaries.



Note the Talabec river in the background. It is unclear which city is meant. Although the meeting took place midway (perhaps near Ravenstein), the artist may even be representing Talabheim, as the ultimate goal of the campaign.

3. The surrender of Talabheim



The keys were offered near a shrine dedicated to Sigmar (in the middle), Taal and Rhya. In the distance the city of Talabheim, with big rocks indicating the crater.



1-3. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 69r, 57v and 294v (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 01:34:31 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (06/01/2014)
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2014, 03:22:01 PM »
The Talabheim delegation asked the Emperor’s forgiveness and implored him to spare not just the city, but Grand Duke Frederik as well. But for his inspired defence of the city, Talabheim would have been destroyed in the Waaagh. Although they had not been involved in the revolt, just as Frederik stood by Talabheim in its darkest hour, Talabheim would stand by him in his darkest hour. They would share whatever punishment the Emperor would deem fit.
 
Wilhem III was highly impressed with the loyalty they displayed:  “The loyalty to your Duke and the loyalty to your Emperor must be one. If they were not, your Duke was to blame. I am not here to act revenge on the innocent or the misguided, but to ensure justice."

The Emperor ordered to arrest the arsenists of the Great Cathedral of Sigmar. Frederik Untermensch, who was slowly recovering, was kept under guard in the Ducal Palace, where Dieter IV was also found. It turned out that the deposed ruler had not been part of the insurrection. Serving only as pawn and pretext, he  had been kept under strict house arrest by Frederik, a measure that was now extended by Wilhelm III.

As the burning of the Great Cathedral had shocked the inhabitants of Talabheim, the arsenists were quickly rounded up, and in a summary judgement condemned to death by Wilhelm III.



1. The judgement of Wilhelm III and the execution of the arsenists of the Great Cathedral. In the background, Frederik Untermensch, still weak and leaning on the balcony of the Ducal palace, is watching the death of his men.

As all the Elector Counts had now arrived with their troops at Talabheim, Wilhem III decided to hold an Imperial Diet in the City to bring all problems surrounding the succession of Dieter IV to a conclusion.


1. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 287r (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 08:26:05 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (06/01/2014)
« Reply #39 on: January 17, 2014, 08:35:05 PM »
Evidently, if he did not want to undermine his own position, the insurrection could not go unpunished, but Wilhelm III did not want to antagonise another powerful family. The legality of the deposition of Dieter IV was somewhat debatable, and Wilhelm was therefore interested in finding a settlement, which would bolster his legitimacy. However, he had to tread a fine line between looking cruel and vindictive, or soft and spineless. As the executions had already shown that he was not afraid of swift justice, he could allow himself more leniency. He was helped by the fact that the Krieglitz family had not been involved in the insurrection of Frederik and that Talabecland had immediately surrendered to the imperial forces.

After four days of negotiations with the Elector Counts, the Krieglitz and the Untermensch families, the Emperor called the Imperial Diet in full session to hear his judgement on the insurgents. Frederik Untermensch had sufficiently recovered to be present, although he still had to be supported by his son.  As he entered, he was greeted first by a sudden silence, then a fluttering of excited whispers. A delegation of the Talabheim nobility and citizens accompanied him, anxious about the verdict but prepared to share his fate.


1. Frederik Untermensch arriving at the Imperial Diet



Frederik Untermensch leaning on his son on his way past his gossiping fellow Electors. Behind him the Talabheim delegation.


1.Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS 134, fol. 192r (ca. 1500), Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 08:27:01 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline BAWTRM

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
« Reply #40 on: January 20, 2014, 12:44:58 PM »
This stuff is just so great, I love it!
"...granted it isn't as retarded as having a lady popping out of your head holding a cup while humping a boar with a sword through its back, but there can only be one Brettonia."

PhillyT

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
« Reply #41 on: January 20, 2014, 09:44:44 PM »
Thank you! Will Frederik Untermensch have to pay the ultimate price for his ambition? What secrets are hidden in Tarnhelm's Keep? What is the difference between diplomatic and diplomatics? And are dark clouds gathering over Marienburg? Stay tuned!
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Commander Bernhardt

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
« Reply #42 on: January 22, 2014, 08:05:14 AM »
Thank you! Will Frederik Untermensch have to pay the ultimate price for his ambition? What secrets are hidden in Tarnhelm's Keep? What is the difference between diplomatic and diplomatics? And are dark clouds gathering over Marienburg? Stay tuned!

ooh exciting!
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 10:52:17 PM by Commander Bernhardt »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
« Reply #43 on: January 24, 2014, 10:52:25 PM »
Of course, all the decisions had already been taken beforehand,  and all the main characters involved knew what was about to happen. But as the session of the Imperial Diet constituted the ritualised closure of the conflict, Wilhelm III was intent on making the most of the opportunity to show both his authority and his clemency.

1. Wilhelm III at the Imperial Diet of Talabheim



At his side the Arch-Chancellor, Johann of Nuln, holding the indictment against Frederik Untermensch

While Frederik kneeled in submission (allegedly helped by a discrete clip in the knee from his son),  the Arch-Chancellor, Johann of Nuln, read out a long list of charges against the Grand-Duke of Talabecland, including treason, murder, arson, sedition, and sacrilege.

Wilhem III then announced his verdict:
Frederik Untermensch, your crimes are grave and many, crimes against the Empire, crimes against the Church, and,  indeed, crimes against Sigmar. According to the laws of gods and men, you have forfeited your goods, your lands, your life.

At this point, the Talabheim delegation, who was not privy to the negotiations, went decidedly pale.

But Sigmar himself, who struck you with his mighty hammer for your transgressions, nevertheless spared your life. And whom the god has spared, let no man put to cinder. In addition, the good people of Talabheim are prepared to share your fate, and we cannot allow innocents to be harmed, when loyalty takes the place of guilt. Your life is safe, therefore, but your title of Grand-Duke Elector of Talabecland and all the associated lands and benefits are withdrawn and return to the Imperial Crown.

We have never seen such loyalty as displayed by the City of Talabheim! But the loyalty to their Duke and the loyalty to their Emperor must be one. We fear, therefore, that another Duke will not have their loyalty and neither will the Empire. It is only for that reason and our high regard for the people of Talabheim, that we elevate the City of Talabheim to the status of Electoral Grand-Duchy. We, Wilhem III, Emperor of the Holy Empire of Sigmar, invest you, Frederik Untermensch, with the Electoral Grand-Duchy of Talabheim. You entered as Grand-Duke Elector of Talabecland. You kneeled as a convict, with titles, lands and life forfeited. Now accept from our hands your new life and fiefdom, and rise again as Grand-Duke Elector of Talabheim.


When they saw Frederik rising as the Grand-Duke of an independent Talabheim, the delegation of Talabheim started weeping out of relief and joy. Frederik, too, wept, but some say out of impotent rage and humiliation.  The leader of the Talabheim delegation addressed the Emperor: Your Imperial Majesty! Because of your might, we have opened our gates for you; because of your mercy, we now open our hearts for you. Long live his Imperial Majesty Wilhelm!

The whole room shook when the Imperial Diet’s took up the call  “Long live his Imperial Majesty Wilhelm!”

After repeated calls for silence finally had effect, the Imperial Diet proceeded with the investiture of Leopold Krieglitz, son of the deposed Dieter IV, as Grand-Duke of (the reduced) Talabecland.

2. The investiture of Leopold Krieglitz



Note the new Grand-Duke of Talabheim standing next to the throne.



1-2. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 168v  & 281r (both modified; ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 08:32:59 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/01/2014)
« Reply #44 on: January 26, 2014, 10:30:50 AM »
These and other stipulations were subsequently formally issued in the Golden Bull of Talabheim, also known as the Reformatio Wilhelmi:

  • A general pardon was issued to all those willingly or unwillingly involved in the insurrection.
  • The Elector County of Talabecland was withdrawn from Frederik Untermensch and granted to Leopold Krieglitz, son of Dieter Krieglitz, deposed Elector Count of Stirland.
  • In recognition of the loyalty of its citizens to Frederik Untermensch, the City of Talabheim was detached from Talabecland, its status raised to Electoral Grand Duchy and granted to Frederik Untermensch. 
  • The income of certain tax rights and lands belonging to Frederik Untermensch were earmarked to pay for the reconstruction of the Great Cathedral.
  • The investiture of Ulrich Haupt-Anderssen as Elector Count of Stirland was confirmed.
  • The title and function of Rex Remanorum (King of the Remans) was created.


1. Wilhelm III signing the Golden Bull of Talabheim



With the Imperial Diet of Talabheim, the War of Succession ended in triumph for Wilhelm III, and his claim to the Imperial Throne was never challenged again.

  • He had set an example in Frederik Untermensch, but without alienating a powerful family, nor indeed the Elector Counts (always very sensitive and suspicious when an Emperor was acting against one of their own). 
  • He had reached an agreement with the Krieglitz family, which understandably had felt disenfranchised by the loss of the Electorate of Stirland.
  • In accepting their fiefs from the hands of Wilhelm III, they not only publicly acknowledged him as Emperor, but the legality of their positions as Grand Dukes now depended on the legality of Wilhelm III as Emperor.  Furthermore, the Krieglitz as Grand Dukes of Talabecland were away from their traditional power base in Stirland, and had to compete with the Untermensch, who retained, of course, their family lands, influence and connections in Talabecland. However, if Wilhelm III had hoped the two families would become rivals, and maintain a balance of power, he was mistaken. Instead of competing, the two families started to inter-marry, and within a few generations, a member of the Krieglitz-Unterna family would rule both Talabecland and Talabheim in personal union.


For this success, he had only paid a relatively small price. The Untermensch family had insisted on an Electoral status, and the other Elector Counts had equally resisted the creation of a new Electoral vote. Therefore, Wilhelm III transferred the vote of Westerland, held by the Emperor, to the newly created Grand Duchy of Talabheim, with the proviso that the vote would return to the Emperor, if Talabheim and Talabecland were ever to be ruled in personal union – an act of foresight, as we have seen above.

In addition, Wilhelm had to concede to the Elector Counts the creation of the Rex Remanorum.b The RR, chosen by the Elector Counts, would be basically the heir apparent to the Emperor, and for his succession on the Emperor's death only the coronation by the Grand Theogonist was still needed. Wilhelm had at first been unwilling to accept what would amount to a watch-dog for the Electors and perhaps not so much an heir in waiting but a rival and threat to his reign. However, he finally agreed on condition that only the Emperor himself could propose a candidate. For more than 20 years, Wilhelm did not nominate a candidate, and whenever an Elector broached the subject, the Emperor would hint at the Elector's most despised rival as a possibility, at which point the issue was quickly dropped. As it turned out, the new function would in fact help to ensure the Imperial Throne for the Reikland Dynasty for generations to come.

In a separate and secret codicil, the Elector Counts agreed to new taxes to be used for the submission of Marienburg. The Emperor knew that the issue had been far from settled, but the campaign season was close to an end, and he also recognised that, in any case, without some sort of naval power, the Imperial Forces were unlikely to take the city without wholesale destruction -something he wanted to avoid. Until the next campaign season, he would make good use of the time and resources to thoroughly prepare the campaign.



The original copy of the Golden Bull with the signature and monogram of Wilhem III is still held in the Imperial Archives.

2. The Golden Bull of Talabheim



Sadly, the golden bulla (seal) itself was lost in unknown circumstances.



a. Given the odium as arsenists of the Great Cathedral that clung to the Untermensch name, the son of Frederik Untermensch changed the family name to Untern.
b. The title, claiming the heritage of the Reman Empire, was said to have been used by Sigmar, before taking the title of Emperor.



1. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 353v (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
2. Golden Bull of Frederick III, issued 1465 September 4, in Neustadt. Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart A 602 Nr 674 = WR 674
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 09:31:09 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
It is not enough to have no ideas of your own; you must also be incapable of expressing them.
Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline BAWTRM

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/01/2014)
« Reply #45 on: January 28, 2014, 12:51:05 PM »
Still massively enjoying this grand history of the empire. I love all those illustrations with their completely wrong kinds of dress, armour etc. for depicting their subject (in reality Roman characters).

I find the 'King of the Remans' bit rather peculiar. Is there indeed some bit of Empire lore that refers to this?
"...granted it isn't as retarded as having a lady popping out of your head holding a cup while humping a boar with a sword through its back, but there can only be one Brettonia."

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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/01/2014)
« Reply #46 on: January 28, 2014, 01:21:54 PM »
Thank you! It was not necessarily that the knowledge for historical accuracy was lacking (although it often was), but rather that there was no demand for it. Until the Renaissance, people (both Christians and Muslims) were not interested in the Romans and Greeks per se, but as practical examples in all aspects of life. It was far easier to identify with them, if they were depicted in contemporary surroundings.

There is, indeed, no Warhammer Empire lore for the title "King of the Remans". It is taken from the historical Holy Roman Empire, where Rex Romanorum (King of the Romans) was the title of the elected king, before he was crowned emperor by the Pope. Several kings never made it emperor. In later times, it was also used (as here) for the heir apparent to the imperial crown. For instance, Friedrich III became King of the Romans in 1440, and Emperor in 1452 until his death in 1493. His son Maximilian was elected King of the Romans in 1486, and became Emperor in 1508. He was not actually crowned by the Pope, but with Papal assent took the title "Elected Roman Emperor." His successor, Charles V, would be the last emperor to be crowned by the Pope.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 01:31:30 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/01/2014)
« Reply #47 on: January 29, 2014, 07:40:56 AM »
Digression: the Imperial Signum (a diplomatic1 note)

Documents of the Imperial Chancellery express imperial authority through titles, seals, and bulls, but, as can be seen in the Golden Bull of Talabheim above, often also through monograms or signa. Indeed, the first and no doubt most famous signum is that Sigmar himself.2




In this  monogram,  the four consonants S G M R are attached to the ends of the cross-arms (representing the four wind directions), while the three vowels, I, A, and V (V=U in Reman), are joined in the central rhomb of the cross. Read clockwise, they form the name SIGMARVS. The monogram is accompanied by a signum line in Reman, which translates into “Sign of Sigmar, the most glorious Emperor.”

Although Sigmar could wield the pen as well as the hammer, the signum  was usually prepared by the Chancellery, and Sigmar himself only added the finishing touch (the so called Vollzugslinie).


In later times, the imperial signa become more and more elaborate. For example, the signum of Emperor Sigismund II (reigned 479 - 505)


is to be read SIGisMUNDus dEi gRATia imPeratOr semper augustus , or ”Sigismund, by the grace of god, Emperor, ever venerable."3 Note that the signum contains each letter only once, with AM and VN linked, while E is contained in G, and O in D.   
 
The accompanying signum line usually reads: Signum verum serenissimi principis Sigismundi divina favente clementia imperatoris invictissimi et gloriosissimi (True sign of the most serene prince Sigismund, by the favour of divine mercy, the most invincible and most glorious emperor.)


The signum of Wilhelm III (here taken from the Golden Bull of Talabheim)


constitutes both culmination and end of the Imperial signa, at least in documents. His successors will start to use their coat of arms instead, or even keep it limited to just their signature.

As with the signum of Sigmar, the basis is formed by a cross, as symbol of unity, with at the top a stylised twin comet.



This basis is then expanded to form the name Wilhelm III.



To the main frame, the letters DG AC ES IV are added as abbreviations of the imperial titels Imperator Dei Gratia Augustus Caesar Electus Sigmari Invictus (Emperor by the grace of god, Augustus Caesar, Chosen of Sigmar, the Invincible). 



The monogram also contains the two principles of Wilhelm’s rule: PAX and LEX (Peace and Law). 


To keep the symmetry, lex is written from right to left.

Last but not least, we detect the famous but enigmatic vowel-combination  AEIOV, which can be found on most buildings, books and other objects related to Wilhem III.


In his diary, Wilhem III  writes:

Pei welhem pau oder auff welhem Silbergeschir oder kircngebant oder andern klainaten aeiov  der strich und die funff puestaben, stend, das ist mein, herczog Wilhelm des Jungern, gebessen oder ich hab das selbig paun oder machen lassen

(On whatever building or on whatever silver dishes or church clothes or other precious goods the line and the five letters AEIOV stand, that is the property of me, Duke Wilhelm the Younger, or I myself have had it build or made.)


To give just some examples:

4. Psalterium with hymns for Sigmar, dated 2477, Imperial Library, Altdorf.



5. The "Giant’s Bone" found during the reconstruction of the Great Cathedral in Altdorf; Imperial Museum, Altdorf.


Wilhelm himself does not seem to have ever explained the meaning, but next to the letters in the diary another hand has added, in both the classical “Altdorf est imperare orbi universo”, and the vernacular “Aller Erd’ Imperium oblieget uns” (Altdorf/we are to rule the whole world),  which has become the most widely accepted interpretation.

Epigraphic analysis shows that the entry, although not by Wilhem himself, was made during his lifetime. Indeed, other contemporary sources give the same interpretation. However, as this part of the diary was written at a time when Altdorf was not the imperial capital, and Wilhelm had just become Grand-Duke of Reikland, with no prospect of becoming Emperor, this explanation seems unlikely to be the original one. 

Later in the same diary, the following elegiac couplet in the classical language can be found:

En, amor ellectis [sic], iniustis ordinor ultor;
Sic Wilhelmus ego rengna
[sic] mea rego.

(Look, I was appointed as love for the chosen and avenger against the unjust.
Thus, I ,Wilhelm, rule over my realms.)

   
As our readers will have already discerned, the couplet contains both spelling and metrical errors – Wilhelm’s grasp of the classical language seems to have been somewhat wanting.
 
A recently found fragment of a Chronicle6 written around 2460 seems to have the correct version:

Der kayser het auch in derselben zeit nach seinem willen an der purkh ze Altdorff aines tails pawen und sein liberey, die funff  vocalpüchstaben, an manigen steten der purkh kostlich machen lassen. Da het ainer dem kayser ze smach uber dieselben püchstaben geschriben: Altdorffs Ehr is offenbahr verdorben.' Dem kayser das missuielle und liess die abhin. Welcherlay auslegung der kayser auf denselben puchstaben het, ist in disen zwain classischen versen begriffen, die dises püches zesambseczer an ainer kostlichen almar desselben kaysers gesehen hat:

En! Amor Electis, Iniustis Ordinor Ultor.
Sic Wilhelmus ego rex mea iura rego.


Das ist teutsch sovil geredt: Sehet, ich pin geordnet lieb den erwellten, und recher den ungerechten; also regier ich, kunig Wilhelm, meine recht.

(At the same time, the emperor had part of the castle in Altdorf and his library built according to his wishes,  and had the five vowels at various places of the castle richly adorned. To the shame of the emperor, someone had written over those letters: “Altdorf’s honour is obviously tainted”. The emperor was dismayed and had it removed.  What interpretation the Emperor had of the same letters, is comprised in these two classical verses, which the compiler of this book has seen on a precious book cabinet of the same emperor:

En! Amor Electis, Iniustis Ordinor Ultor.
Sic Wilhelmus ego rex mea iura rego.

That is in Teutsch as much as: Look, I was appointed as love for the chosen and avenger against the unjust., thus, I , king Wilhelm, rule over my rights.)
   


But again, the plural “regna mea” (or mea iura in the version of the Chronicle) indicates that this too was probably written only after his election to Emperor.   Note also the very first occurrence of the many parodies of the device.

There are also two precious chalices belonging to Wilhelm III (one dated to 2451) that bear above the vowel-combination the words: “Aquila Ejus Iuste Omnia Vincet” (His Eagle will justly vanquish all).

Whether we will ever know the original meaning remains doubtful. Some scholars have invested great time and effort to come to a definitive solution, producing vast volumes with arguments pro and contra certain interpretations, but I fear “Am End Ist Olles Umsonst” (in the end, everything is in vain). 



1. Diplomatic (British English) or diplomatics (American English): the study of documents.
2. Own invention based on the signum of Charlemagne.

3. Signum of Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund of Luxemburg (1368-1437)
4. Cod. 3079, fol 1r, (original date 1477 modified) Österreichische Nationalbibliothek , Wien
5. Femur of a mammoth, found in 1443, when the foundations were laid for the gothic north tower of the Stephansdom in Vienna; Geologisches Archiv, Wien.
6. Modified text from Lhotsky, A., Eine unbeachtete Chronik Österreichs aus der Zeit Kaiser Friedrichs III., in: Festschrift zur Feier des zweihundertjähr. Bestandes des Haus-, Hof- u. Staatsarchivs, hrsg. v. Leo San tifa 11 e r, 1. Bd. (Mitteilungen d. Österr. Staatsarchivs, Erg. Bd. 2), Wien 1949, S. 538-548
« Last Edit: July 19, 2017, 03:16:26 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
It is not enough to have no ideas of your own; you must also be incapable of expressing them.
Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/01/2014)
« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2014, 12:49:37 PM »
Post merged.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 10:07:15 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline S.O.F

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2014, 06:31:42 PM »
Lovely stuff again sir. A question though, isn't it easier and more lore friendly to refer to Reman as Classical? In most the Warhammer stuff I've gone through I think latin in the Warhammer world is more commonly referred to as such, a product of the Verenian Cult's influence in legal matters. Reman always feels like more the living speech of those who live in Remas, which now would be a dialect of Tilean where Classical has the proper dead ancient language feel. Just a thought.

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