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Author Topic: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time  (Read 108433 times)

Offline Mathi Alfblut

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2014, 08:17:22 PM »
Lovely stuff.
I would agree with S.O.F that it would be better to refer to Reman as classical. After all, Remas is a contemporary political entity but it is just a shadow of the Reman Empire.
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Offline Darknight

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2014, 08:25:30 PM »
I particularly like that signum; did you invent that yourself? Regardless, I am tempted to steal it.
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
« Reply #52 on: January 30, 2014, 08:44:23 PM »
@ SOF: Good point. I had not even looked it up - I just had the Reman legions of Marcus Octavius in mind, without thinking that something else might be in use. Or that, as Mathi points out, Remas is still an existing entity.

On a side note: there is in fact a way  to “flip-flop” the Westerland/Nordland Electoral vote as you propose. Princes could always invoke “Hausrecht” over custom, i.e. houserule their inheritance. In most cases, that only caused family infighting, and was reversed one way or the other, but let us assume that the ancestor in question enjoyed unlimited respect over the generations. So, it is quite possible that according to Hausrecht, the title would shift between family branches. However, the title itself would not change.

To make this work we have to assume further:
- Westerland and Nordland were in fact always part of the same Electorate. Let us suppose here that Nordland is part of Westerland. 
- The wording of the sources is sloppy (what do you expect – it is GW!): when they talk about an Elector of Nordland, they mean in fact the Elector of Westerland, but of the Nordland branch of the family.
- Given the relatively frequent changes, we have to assume that the shift occurs, if there is no male heir in one branch to take the title at the time it becomes available (but the line itself does not have to be extinct in a direct line). 
- This system stops with the death of the last Westerland Elector. As Magnus did not honour the Hausrecht, both branches must have become extinct in the direct line.



@ Darknight: As it says in the footnote: my own design, but based on the signum of Charlemagne.

« Last Edit: July 19, 2017, 09:56:15 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline S.O.F

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
« Reply #53 on: January 30, 2014, 09:35:35 PM »
On a side note: there is in fact a way  to “flip-flop” the Westerland/Nordland Electoral vote as you propose. Princes could always invoke “Hausrecht” over custom, i.e. houserule their inheritance. In most cases, that only caused family infighting, and was reversed one way or the other, but let assume that the ancestor in question enjoyed unlimited respect over the generations. So, it is quite possible that according to Hausrecht, the title would shift between family branches. However, the title itself would not change.

To make this work we have to assume further:
- Westerland and Nordland were in fact always part of the same Electorate. Let us suppose here that Nordland is part of Westerland. 
- The wording of the sources is sloppy (what do you expect – it is GW!): when they talk about an Elector of Nordland, they mean in fact the Elector of Westerland, but the of the Nordland branch of the family.
- Given the relatively frequent changes, we have to assume that the shift occurs, if there is no male heir in one branch to take the title at the time it becomes available (the line itself does not have to be extinct in a direct line). 
- This system stops with the death of the last Westerland Elector. As Magnus did not honour the Hausrecht, both branches must have become extinct in the direct line.


Seems a rather elegant solution to the problem. When the Elector of Nordland is written we can perhaps consider the sources are not particularly scholarly but taken from old annals. So when some scribe is noting the events of some time in say the 1500's he simply notes Elector of Nordland as he is unlikely aware the Electorship actually derives from Westerland. Where if say we had a faux primary source Volkshalle role of a similar year the Elector in question would be listed with full and proper titles. I mean when comes to how the fluff is written I often times try and attach context of source to it. WHFRP works I tend to think of more as neutral/scholarly works while the army books tend to be hastily thrown together propaganda pieces at the behest of the Cult of Sigmar.
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
« Reply #54 on: January 31, 2014, 11:49:24 PM »
Post merged.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 10:07:49 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (01/02/2014)
« Reply #55 on: February 05, 2014, 10:14:05 AM »
Post merged
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 10:08:13 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (05/02/2014)
« Reply #56 on: February 08, 2014, 01:07:07 PM »
The War of Succession: epilogue.

In the months to come, Frederik Untermensch made an almost complete recovery, although his left arm remained paralysed and his speech continued to suffer from a slight slur. He never opposed Wilhelm III again, but it is also said that he never overcame his resentment towards the Emperor.

In his memoirs, Siegfried von Trautenau, major-domo of Grand Duke Frederick, recounts: In the wake of these unfortunate events [i.e. the War of Succession], the Grand Duke had become prone to recurring periods of deepest melancholy. As a remedy, he commissioned an exquisite triptych for his privy chambers. In his brooding moments, the Grand Duke would lock himself in his chambers, sitting in meditation before the painting, sometimes for hours, until his spirits had been sufficiently lifted. At all other times, the triptych remained closed and locked, and he never allowed anyone else to see the inside, leading to baseless gossip among the servants that it must contain some vile work of pornography and perversion. 

Based on the notes and receipts in the Grand Ducal archive, the scholar Jan Bienenstock was very recently able to identify the triptych in question as the Saga of Crispin and Crispinian. According to the documents, the painting by the hand of the Westerland painter Harnoult van den Boske (or Aert van den Bossche) was commissioned by Frederik in the summer of 2430. Shortly after completion, the painter disappeared in unresolved circumstances, but, as Bienenstock discovered, the triptych has survived, and is now in possession of the Talabheim Museum of Fine Arts.

The subject of the painting, the Saga of Crispin and Crispinian, is a tale of valour and self-sacrifice from the Age of Wars. In 1577, a Middenheim army invaded Talabecland, seized the city of Talagaad and started a 20 year long siege of the city of Talabheim. During the first winter, Middenheim soldiers managed to capture two captains of the Taalbaston Guard, the twins Crispin and Crispinianus. Despite being subjected to various forms of torture, the brothers stubbornly refused to betray their city and reveal any details about the Talabheim defences; they were finally put to the sword, sacrificing their lives for their city.

1. The Saga of Crispin and Crispinian – central panel


The story in the central panel of the triptych unfolds from left to right, alternating between fore- and background. In the left-hand background, we can see a somewhat fanciful depiction of the city of Talagaad, which served as the headquarters of the Middenheim army during the siege.
The brothers have been escorted out of the city, and are first “softened up” with a club, before their toenails are extracted. Tied to the central tree, dividing the picture in two halves, the twins, with sharp irons driven between the toe- and fingernails, are flayed alive. On either side, almost as a kind of evil pendant to the twin heroes, the Middenheim general with his entourage is represented, once on foot, once on horseback, but always watching in malicious glee. On the right hand side, the torture continues in the rocky landscape near the crater of Talabheim, where the brothers are pushed from a cliff into the frozen waters of the Taal and then boiled alive in a bronze cauldron. 

The Saga of Crispin and Crispinian – central panel (detail)


At the bottom, the hands with spiked nails are visible. To the right, you can discern one of the twins trying to crawl away after his fall from the cliff. On the frozen waters of the Taal, a game of Kolf is played.

2. The Saga of Crispin and Crispinian – wings



The last scene of the central panel is repeated in greater detail on the left wing, but set in different surroundings:  in front of a building that notably resembles Tarnhelm’s Keep in Talabheim. An angel of Shallya comforts the suffering twins. The right wing depicts the final act: the decapitation, and, in the background, a hasty, unceremonial burial, a last insult to these brave captains of the Taalbaston Guard.


The subject of the Saga can hardly be said to be  “a vile work of pornography and perversion” . Indeed, it seems quite appropriate for the halls of the Grand Duke of Talabheim, but it does seem rather unusual and morbid as a remedy for a melancholic disposition. Closer inspection leads us to suspect that there is something amiss under the surface.

Firstly, the twins bear an uncanny resemblance to Wilhelm III. Aert van den Bossche, of course, also painted  the Coronation of Wilhem III (v. supra, post 12), just before he accepted the commission of Frederik Untermensch. Perhaps no coincidence on Frederiks part? Anyway, if we overlay the face of Crispin (or Crispinianus?) from the left wing triptych on the (reversed) face of Wilhelm III from the Coronation and adjust for the different position of the head, it turns out to be an almost perfect match.


Furthermore, the general of Middenheim looks remarkably like a younger Frederik Untermensch. Just vanity? Or an expression of the thought “If only I had been younger, things might have ended differently”? In the painting at least, Wilhelm III is completely at his whim and mercy.

One may, therefore, conclude at least with some degree of probability that the triptych does indeed represent Frederik’s  fantasies of vengeance towards his victor. The objection can be raised that Wilhelm is playing the hero part in the saga, and Frederik the villain. However, this is likely to be a safety device, as the painting could easily be interpreted as an indication of sedition and lese-majesty – which in fact it is. Presumably, this is the reason why Frederik never allowed anyone else to see the triptych in the first place.  And perhaps also the reason why it is the last known painting of the artist...


But were they just spiteful fantasies? The discovery of the triptych lends credence to a more sinister tale. Shortly after being installed as Grand Duke of Talabheim, Frederik Untermensch turned Tarnhelm’s Keep (depicted in the triptych!) into a prison. Some believe that this was to placate the reformist Cult of Shallya, but, from the start, there were persistent rumours about secret torture chambers, hidden deep within the very bowels of the dungeon.  Here, selected prisoners would enjoy special treatment at the hands of Frederik himself - prisoners selected because of their resemblance to Wilhelm III!

This could  may also explain the tales of horror about “the Beast” stalking Tarnhelm’s Keep at night and killing prisoners in a most bloody and gruesome fashion.  Perhaps the Beast was not a beast, but an Untermensch.

Without doubt all very fascinating speculation, but, ultimately, just that: speculation. The one who really knows, Frederik Untermensch, Grand Duke of Talabheim, died in 2443.




1. The Martyrdom of Saints Crispin and Crispinian (central triptych) by Aert van den Bossche (1494), National Museum Warsaw.
2. Martyrdom of Saints Crispin and Crispinian, (right wing triptych) by Aert van den Bossche (1494), Museum van de Stad Brussel, K/1977/1&2.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2017, 02:03:25 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/02/2014)
« Reply #57 on: February 10, 2014, 10:11:51 PM »
I have re-arranged the posts a bit, merging the several parts of the digression on the Imperial Signum and placing them after the Golden Bull of Talabheim (post 47). The next digression "The History of Talabecland as Depicted in its Heraldry" connects better with the epilogue. 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 10:18:13 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Commander Bernhardt

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/02/2014)
« Reply #58 on: February 21, 2014, 10:52:21 AM »
wonderfull! What's next down the line?
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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/02/2014)
« Reply #59 on: February 22, 2014, 09:19:42 AM »
Springtime and the campaigning season are approaching. Will Wilhelm want to wage war with the wicked Warienburgers? But there is the digression into heraldry first. 
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The History of Talabecland as reflected in its heraldry
« Reply #60 on: February 23, 2014, 10:26:17 AM »
Digression: The History of Talabecland as reflected in its heraldry

The hereditary heraldic system as it developed since the 12th century allows much more than just identifying the bearer of a coat of arms. Heraldic changes reflect dynastic and political changes, but heraldry can also be used to express ideological ideas or political statements.

Bertold I Untermensch (fl. 1200) seems to have been the first Untermensch (and the first Duke of Talabecland) to adopt a family coat of arms.  In all probability, this happened when he was invested with the Grand Duchy of Talabecland, and the choice of an eagle reflects a close link with the Empire. No depictions other than his seals have survived, and while these do not indicate the colours (tinctures), contemporary sources describe the coat of arms as a red eagle on gold (in heraldic terms: Or, an eagle displayed Gules).

1. Seal of Bertold I Untermensch





In time, different family branches distinguished themselves by displaying the eagle armed (i.e. with a different tincture for beak and claws). The achievement (whole emblazonment) below of Berthold V from around 1300 also shows the helmet, Grand Ducal coronet and family crest, together with the coat of arms of the major Untermensch vassals.

2.


Or, an eagle displayed Gules armed Azure. Upon a helmet mantled Gules doubled Vert this crest: Issuant from a Grand Ducal coronet Or, a pair of Capricorn horns, dexter Or, sinister Gules.


1. The coat of arms of Bertold I von Zähringen, Margrave of Verona (ca. 1040-1074) is taken from Graf G. (2011), Die heraldische Entwicklung der Wappen des Hauses Baden, p.1. The seal displayed belongs to Bertold V von Zähringen and is taken from Heyk E. (1980 reprint from 1891/2), Die Geschichte der Herzöge von Zähringen, Scientia Verlag Aalen, Table IV.
2. Coat of Arms of the Margrave of Baden (modified) from the Armorial de Bellenville, Français 5230, fol. 63v, (XV century) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 12:52:42 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (23/02/2014)
« Reply #61 on: February 25, 2014, 10:11:54 AM »
In 1360, when Ottilia I proclaimed herself empress, the helmet and Grand Ducal coronet were replaced by an imperial crown, which was also included in the banners of the Ottilian Empire, to symbolise the claim to the imperial throne. 

1. Ottilia I                               



Ottilia I, with the elected Emperor Otto VI underfoot. Talabheim, Grand Ducal Palace.
The sword and book symbolise the firmness and wisdom of her rule, or, alternatively, her zeal in spreading the Ulrician faith by force and persuasion. The painting by an unknown artist, was commissioned by Grand Duke Frederik Untermensch in 2401, the year Dieter IV was elected Emperor. Some scholars interpret the painting as an early indication of Fredrik’s ambitions on the imperial throne.


2. The Ottilian Imperial Coat of Arms and Imperial Banner.

   

The depiction of the Ottilian imperial coat of arms is the first page of a XXII century copy of "Das Ottilische Waffenbuch". The text reads: hiernach folgen die namen und wapen des grosmechtigen loblichen reichs darum ottilia das recht oberst haupt ist (hereafter follow the names and coat of arms of the powerfull and laudible empire of which Ottilia is the rightful supreme head.


1. Saint Catherine of Alexandria (probably the left wing of a triptych), Master of the Legend of Saint Lucy (c. 1470 - c. 1500), Philadephia Museum of Art, Philadephia.
2.  The (modified) coat of arms is taken from, Sammelband mehrerer Wappenbücher (1530) - BSB Cod.icon. 391, fol 63r, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München. The banner is taken from Das Ortenburger Wappenbuch (1466-1473) BSB Cod.icon. 308 u, fol. 22r, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München.
 
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 02:43:13 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Darknight

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/02/2014)
« Reply #62 on: February 25, 2014, 06:31:11 PM »
This is really excellent work, Fidelis - I wonder; would you be able to assemble this together (when it is all done) into a PDF format document for reading / printing? I realize a commercial use would be fruitless (owing to using Warhammer references, as well as these images) but for private use I daresay it would be fine.
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/02/2014)
« Reply #63 on: February 25, 2014, 08:32:43 PM »
Thank you. It is certainly worth a thought. Although it would need to be piecemeal (per reign perhaps): in 5 months, I have not even covered a full year. Since the idea is to cover the period of 2429 to about 2515, at this rate, it will take me about 40 years.  :ph34r:
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/02/2014)
« Reply #64 on: February 26, 2014, 05:30:34 PM »
Digression: The History of Talabecland as reflected in its heraldry - continued.

In all probability, Bertold I Untermensch chose the eagle, because he received Talabecland as an imperial fief. As the Ottilian (Anti-)Empire lasted almost a millenium (1360-2304), it was ironic, but inevitable that the Untermensch coat of arms would become the symbol of the Anti-Empire, and the red Eagle an Anti-Eagle to the Imperial black Eagle. When the Empire was reunited under Magnus, Grand Duke Hermann II of Talabecland was therefore “persuaded” to choose a new coat of arms, retaining, however, the family colours. 



1. Or, a bend Gules. Upon a helmet mantled Or doubled Gules this crest: Issuant from a Grand Ducal coronet Or, a pair of Capricorn horns, Argent.


When, shortly afterwards, Talabecland was reunited with Talabheim (independent since 1750), the Talabheim colours (red and white = Gules and Argent) were incorporated into the new Untermensch coat of arms, to reflect the re-unification.



2. Quartered, 1 and 3: Or, a bend Gules; 3 and 4: checky, Argent and Gules. Upon a helmet mantled Or doubled Gules this crest: Issuant from a Grand Ducal coronet Or, a pair of peacock feathers, between a pair of Capricorn horns, dexter Or, sinister Gules.
 
3. Grand Duke Frederik Untermensch with his coat of arms.



The old “Ottilian” coat of arms was never forbidden by law, and other noble families or Talabec cities were not required to change their coat of arms, if it happened to contain the "Ottilian eagle." Nevertheless, it remained suspect as a symbol of Ottilian separatism. During the short interlude of his reign, Helmut Feuerbach, whose rise and fall is still shrouded in mystery, re-introduced the red eagle. Without a real powerbase in Talabecland, he may have been appealing to Talabec nationalism to garner support. However, that must have raised some eyebrows at the Imperial Court, and various scholars have argued that the suspicions this ill-advised choice inspired contributed to the shortness of his reign.


1. CoA of the Margraves of Baden. This coat of arms was adopted by Hermann II, grandson of Bertold I von Zähringen, and first Margrave of Baden (ca. 1074-1134). Scheibler’sches Wappenbuch (1450-1600), BSB Cod.icon. 312 c fol. 16 Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München.
2. CoA adopted by Jakob I, Margrave of Baden (1407-1453). Scheibler’sches Wappenbuch (1450-1600), BSB Cod.icon. 312 c fol. 12, 16 Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München
3. Detail from the Markgrafentafel by Hans Baldung Grien (around 1511). Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe. The full picture can be found here: http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/index.php?topic=47520.msg857681#msg857681
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 04:36:34 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Of course, the Golden Bull of Talabheim “heralded” a major change in Talabecland, and the new Krieglitz dynasty  introduced its own coat of arms.

Dieter IV, as emperor, had preferred the coat of arms of the house of Unfähiger, as shown here in this beautiful stained glass window from the Cathedral in Nuln, which miraculously survived the Waaagh and Dieter’s downfall. 

1. Coat of Arms of Dieter IV from Nuln Cathedral



Quartered, 1 & 4: Azure three fleurs-de-lis Or ; 2 & 3: Gules three lions passant gardant in pale Or armed and langued, the whole surrounded by a Garter; for a Crest the Imperial crown Or and Gules; for Supporters, dexter a lion rampant gardant Or, sinister a dragon Gules, Motto 'Dieu et mon Droit' (God and My Right) below the shield.
Note the Blue Garter, as symbol of the Order of the Knights Panther. When Dieter IV was made an honorary knight of the Order, he was so proud that he included the garter into his achievement. When he had become fat, it was joked that it was not a garter, but a belt as symbol of his gluttony.



Initially, the supporters of the coat of arms consisted of Dieter’s favourite animals: a dragon and his pet, Greyhound called Ball. When the latter died, Dieter was so distraught, that he replaced the Greyhound in his coat of arms with a lion.

2. Coat of Arms of Dieter IV from Julbach Manor.



The inscription reads: Dieter Imperator Augustus Quartus incl(itus) armis magnanimus struxit hoc opus egregium (The August Emperor Dieter IV renowned in war, magnanimous, constructed this egregious building.


As we have seen, Dieter had tried for a long time to acquire a real dragon for the Imperial Menagerie, and when he finally succeeded in 2429, as part of the price for the secession of  Marienburg, it contributed to his disposition. Because of his unpopularity, his coat of arms was sometimes destroyed in public places after his fall by the populace, although sources close to the Krieglitz attribute this to Wilhelm III. 

3. Destroyed Coat of Arms of Dieter IV from Nuln




1. Royal Arms of Henry VIII in his later reign, Hampton Court.
2. Royal Arms of Henry VIII in his earlier reign, Borehamwood Essex. The original text reads: "Henricus Rex Octavus, Rex inclit. armis magnanimus struxit hoc opus egregium,"  or "King Henry VIII, the magnanimous king renowned in arms, constructed this egregious building."
3. Royal Arms of Henry VIII, East Barsham Manor
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 04:38:09 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Perhaps Dieter IV thought the Krieglitz coat of arms too  “fishy”: when the Krieglitz branch of the Unfähiger had been invested with the Grand County of Stirland, it had adopted the Stirland Lurkerfish instead of the Unfähiger Lions. As the new Elector Count of Talabecland, Leopold Krieglitz returned to the Krieglitz coat of arms.

1. Coat of Arms of the Krieglitz family



Quartered 1 & 4 : Azure, semé-de-lys Or, a bordure Gules; 2 & 3 Azure, semy of crosslets Or and two barbels addorsed, haurient and embowed Or.

As we have seen, the Krieglitz intermarried with the Untermensch, and the Krieglitz-Untern dynasty that eventually came to rule a re-united Talabecland merged the coat of arms of the two families. 

2. Coat of Arms of the Krieglitz-Untern family



Quartered, 1 & 4, Azure, semé-de-lys Or, a bordure Gules; 2 & 3 Azure, semy of crosslets Or and two barbels addorsed, haurient and embowed Or. Overall Or, a bend Gules.




1 & 2. Coat of Arms of Anjou-Bar and of Anjou-Bar-Lorraine (modified: the three alerions argent of Lorraine have been deleted), as adopted by René d'Anjou (1409-1480).
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 04:39:23 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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As as closing paragraph for this heraldic note, it seems fitting to spend a few words on the successors to the Krieglitz as Elector Counts of Stirland, the Haupt-Anderssens.

The original coat of arms of the Haupt-Anderssen, Viscounts of Wurtberg (later renamed Wurtbad), consisted of three black stag's antlers on a field of gold, perhaps indicating their attachment to Taal. Ulrich IIIa seems to have introduced in 2227 as crest the red hunting horn, which would become one of the main symbols of the Haupt-Anderssen and later Stirland.

Ulrich V Haupt-Anderssen was the younger son of Count Eberhard IV and Henriette of Mömpelgard. He was called "der Vielgeliebte" (the much loved one), either because of his benevolent disposition towards the common folk , or because he was married three times and had numerous illegitimate children. 

1. Ulrich V and his wives.


Or, three stag's antlers of 4 branches, Sable. The paintings are part of a now lost triptychon. Wurtbad, Electoral Palace.


His adoption of a new coat of arms reflects not only his investiture as Elector Count in 2429, but probably also the Krieglitz opposition: by choosing the Stirland Lurker fish from the Krieglitz coat of arms (but in a different colour), he symbolically depicted the replacement of  the Krieglitz as Elector Count of Stirland.   


2. Coat of arms of Ulrich V, after his investiture as Elector Count of Stirland, with the subordinate fiefdoms.


Quartered 1 & 4, Or three stag's antlers of 4 branches, Sable; 2 & 3, Gules two barbels addorsed, haurient, palewise , and embowed Or, Upon a helmet Or mantled Sable semé of vine leaves Or this crest: a red hunting horn stringed Or, enguiché Or, and from the mouthpiece issuant three plumes: Gules, Argent, and Azure.


a. For some reason, the name of Ulrich was very popular wih the Haupt-Anderssens, in spite of their attachment to Taal. This has led to some scholarly speculations, including the emendation of the name to Erich. However, all of these speculations are higly doubtful.



1. Ulrich V of Württemberg and his three wives, by an anonymous painter (1470-1480), Landesmuseum Württemberg, Stuttgart.
2. Coat of Arms of the Counts of Württenberg. Wappenbuch des St. Galler Abtes Ulrich Rösch (1463-1491), Cod. Sang. 1084, p. 209, Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen. 
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 12:53:35 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Post merged.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2014, 08:11:40 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Commander Bernhardt

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it's great that you keep on dooing this! It must be a lot of work to find the right images?
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Thank you. Yes, it requires quite some work, in particular as I want to stick (more or less) to the chronology:
Wilhelm III = Friedrich III (1440-1493)
Matthias/Luitpold = Maximilian I/Filips the Fair (1496-1519)
Karl Franz = Charles V (1519-1556)

I allowed myself one major anachronism: Henry VIII as Dieter IV, because he is just too perfectly cast for the role. Of course, that and other decisions have continuing and sometimes unexpected consequences. I am always grateful, if anyone can point out errors or inconsistencies. 

Another problem (touched upon in another thread) is that the Empire does not really change much since Magnus, while the historical parallel period saw major changes in all fields. That does add further limitations, as I do not want the depictions to look too outdated. Of course, by the time of Karl Franz, that difficulty will have all but disappeared.
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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The Second Campaign against Marienburg

With the advent of spring,a the problem of Marienburg, like a bird of passage, returned to the Imperial Court. Wilhelm III had been using the winter months to prepare the campaign to return Marienburg to the Empire. Because of the necessary secrecy, preparations did not proceed as fast as he had hoped, but he was faced with increasing impatience from the Elector Counts.

1. Wilhelm III at the Imperial Council



At a meeting of the Imperial Council, Wilhelm III discussed the various options with his closest advisors. To capture the city, there were three basic options: storm, siege or subterfuge.

Unfortunately, the Emperor would have to fight with one hand tied to his back, as he did not want to kill the goose that laid the golden egg. That goose was not the city as such (houses and harbours can always be rebuild), but its people, their skills, knowledge, and the foreign trade networks they had build. Storming the city would in all likelihood end in massive slaughter of the population, which Wilhelm wanted to avoid at all cost. Besieging the city was, at least in that respect, a far better option: the Emperor was confident that the Marienburg merchants, known for their gourmet tastes,  would prefer submission before starvation, in particular when given favourable terms.

The river Reik and the Great Northern Road provided excellent advance and supply routes. However, this was more than offset by the geophysical conditions around Marienburg, which was protected no less by the surrounding marshes and wetlands than by its massive walls (the Vloedmuur).  The immediate vicinity of the city had been turned into polders, but this did little to improve the situation for a siege or assault.  Movement, hampered by the numerous drainage canals, was channelled through small dykes and bridges, which could be breached or destroyed. The polder soil itself remained soggy, and unsuited for heavy cavalry or artillery. The terrain also favoured guerrilla actions, which could threaten the rear area and supply lines. Although they could not care less about politics, the Fenn Loonies in particular could well pose such a threat, either in the pay of Marienburg, or out of sheer malice.

2. Marienburg and the Wasteland





Detail from the earliest existing map of Marienburg and its surroundings, early 26th century. Like many maps of the time, the Marienburg map is oriented to the east (as indicated by the compass card on the lower left). A modern map is added for comparison; the rectangle indicates the area covered by the Marienburg map.


The main snag: the lack of an Imperial Fleet in the Sea of Claws. If Marienburg could not be cut off from the sea, any siege would be futile. The few warships that had survived the naval battle against Grom the paunch and the ensuing storm had been confiscated by Marienburg, when the city declared its independence. 

Although Wilhelm III had some ideas to overcome these problems, his preferred option was some kind of subterfuge, but the rash action of Frederik Untermensch had alerted Marienburg to that danger. 

Following a suggestion of Johann of Nuln, it was therefore decided to send an embassy to Marienburg for a last attempt at a diplomatic solution. This embassy was a sincere attempt by Wilhelm III to achieve an equitable solution, and he was willing to go quite far to ensure Marienburg’s re-entry into the Empire. Obviously, the money given to Dieter IV needed to be repaid. Tax exemptions (both temporary and permanent) would be granted. The autonomy Marienburg had previously enjoyed would be enhanced.

3. The Imperial envoys arriving at Marienburg




However, the reception in Marienburg was quite arrogant, impertinent even. The envoys had to wait for the next weekly meeting of the Directorate, as the Directorate “could not schedule an extra council for minor matters”, and when they finally were granted an audience by the Directorate, the representatives of the Emperor first had to kneel in reverence!  Although the Directorate seemed happy to drag out negotiations, it became soon clear to the envoys that no incentive could ever persuade the Directorate to seriously contemplate a return to the Empire.


4. The Imperial envoys before the Marienburg Directorate.



At this point, the envoys embarked on the second, secret task given by Wilhelm III, in case negotiations were futile: to initiate the first stage (subterfuge) of the military campaign against Marienburg.


a. According to WFRP sources, Wilhelm send three expeditions against Marienburg in 2429. However, it is highly unlikely that the deposition of Dieter IV, the election of Wilhelm III, the War of Succession, and three campaigns against Marienburg could have taken place in the short timeframe of a single year.



1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik, p. 417 (1484/85) Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
2. Luzernerkarte (modified) by Hans Heinrich Wägmann and Renward Cysat (1597-1613), Signatur ZHB Kart. IX/13Universitätsbibliothek Bern.
3. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 61 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
4. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 836 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern

« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 04:14:48 PM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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I added a geophysical paragraph (including a "historical" map of Marienburg) and merged the two previous posts.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2014, 11:41:30 AM by Fidelis von Sigmaringen »
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Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)

Offline Naitsabes

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lovely stuff!

The exhaustive details really bring it to life. however, for chumps like me not living and breathing the recent history of the Empire it can get a bit confusing at times. How about editing the first post with some broad stroke timeline.

- X von sowieso-anderswo ruled from this year to this year
- this year battle of xyz
- Y von silly-willy claimed the throne
- whatnot etc.

and then list the post numbers with the art and details you so carefully pulled together. You must have something like this written up somewhere...unless it's all in your head which would be...scary ::heretic::

just a suggestion, keep it up!
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Offline Fidelis von Sigmaringen

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Good point - I'll get right on it. But not to worry: Warhammer history is confusing, because there are often conflicting sources, which are not always easily integrated into a consistent story. In addition, I am trying to paper over the cracks and fill in the blanks with my own inventions, based on actual history. As such, it is indeed more in my head than on paper: the History is a living document (regularly being edited and re-edited), and, unfortunately, the timeline will have to mirror that.
It is not enough to have no ideas of your own; you must also be incapable of expressing them.
Sex, lies and manuscripts: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)