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Author Topic: Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)  (Read 745 times)

Offline Karak Norn Clansman

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Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)
« on: September 30, 2017, 01:44:13 PM »

With Scythians covered for image salvage, it is time for the Dacians, Thracians and Phrygians. These tribes are only of peripheral interest as reference source for Hobgoblins, due to hats, yet they sport some features of interest such as crescent shields, falx weaponry (scythe swords) and lack of pants as is mainly the case for Thracians.


Note that some relevant fantasy and mythology material have been included. These are found at the top of each tribal image section.


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Dacians
















































































































Thracians

















































































Phrygians







Offline GamesPoet

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Re: Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2017, 02:48:11 PM »
Quite the collection. :icon_cool: :eusa_clap:
"Not all who wander are lost ... " Tolkien

"The beauty of curiosity and creativity is so much more useful than the passion of fear." me

"... my old suggestion is forget it, take two aspirins and go paint" steveb

Offline Karak Norn Clansman

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Re: Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2019, 12:17:38 PM »
Cheers! Plus this Thracian one:



« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 12:20:40 PM by Karak Norn Clansman »

Offline Rowsdower

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    • Jesse Cowled
Re: Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2019, 02:11:46 PM »
Those are pretty interesting. I confess I know little of ancient history and have always wanted to learn more.

Offline Karak Norn Clansman

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Re: Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2019, 01:32:57 PM »
Cheers Rowsdower!

I can recommend the History of Rome podcast by Mike Duncan for a rollercoaster through the ancient world upon Roman tracks. Follow that up with Byzantine History (there is a great lecture series out there, but it's for whatever reason lacking several videos when I checked just now), Byzantine Emperors Series by Thersites, and Byzantium: The Lost Empire by John Romer. Every documentary by Romer is worth searching out and seeing.

Because the ancient Mediterranean world conquered and encapsulated in the Roman empire didn't just die in the 400s, but lived on through harrowing times and times of reconquest in the eastern Roman empire right up to 1453.

One rather remarkable easy-going way to get to know the ancient world a bit in some form is through the Europa Barbarorum mods to Total War games Rome I and Medieval II. Both through images and by reading all descriptions. A hassle to install at first, but there are tutorials and people to ask, and it will be worth it once it's up and running!

Offline Rowsdower

  • Posts: 955
  • Is there beer on the sun?
    • Jesse Cowled
Re: Illustrations of Dacia, Thracia & Phrygia (2017 Image Salvage)
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2019, 12:47:31 PM »
Cheers Rowsdower!

I can recommend the History of Rome podcast by Mike Duncan for a rollercoaster through the ancient world upon Roman tracks. Follow that up with Byzantine History (there is a great lecture series out there, but it's for whatever reason lacking several videos when I checked just now), Byzantine Emperors Series by Thersites, and Byzantium: The Lost Empire by John Romer. Every documentary by Romer is worth searching out and seeing.

Because the ancient Mediterranean world conquered and encapsulated in the Roman empire didn't just die in the 400s, but lived on through harrowing times and times of reconquest in the eastern Roman empire right up to 1453.

One rather remarkable easy-going way to get to know the ancient world a bit in some form is through the Europa Barbarorum mods to Total War games Rome I and Medieval II. Both through images and by reading all descriptions. A hassle to install at first, but there are tutorials and people to ask, and it will be worth it once it's up and running!

I remember being obsessed with the Romans and Vikings in middle school but not being able to find many readable books on the subjects and there not being much of an interest in those subjects in my town. So far I've binge watched half of the Netflix Rome docudrama