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Imperial Artisans => The Imperial Office => Topic started by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 17, 2013, 02:47:16 PM

Title: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 17, 2013, 02:47:16 PM
As a spin-off from another thread, I will try to illustrate the history of the Empire under the Holswig-Schliestein Dynasty with contemporary pictures and paintings. Comments, corrections and suggestions are more than welcome.

Chronology of dates and events relevant to this History.1

1152-2304: Age of  Wars 

The Tree of War


(http://i.imgur.com/fnmIRO7.jpg)


Sigmar looks in horror how the Empire devours itself during the Age of Wars. In the treetop, the elected Emperor (in gold) tries to ward off the Ottilian Counter-Emperor (in black). To the left, the Grand Theogonist (in red) is fighting the Ar-Ulric (in blue). Elsewhere, the various social classes are warring amongst themselves. Illumination from the treatise Arbor Bellorum by Honorius Beckstein (ca. 2450), Imperial Library, Altdorf.2
   

2304- : the Empire re-united
2304-2369: Reign of Magnus von Bildhofen (the Pious), who reunites the Empire.
2369-2401: Reign of Leopold Krieglitz
2401-2429: Reign of Dieter IV Krieglitz, grandson of Leopold


2429- Reign of Wilhelm III.

2502: Karl Franz elected Emperor.


1. A more detailed Chronology of the Empire from official and unofficial sources can be found in: http://www.madalfred.com/articles/EMPIRE%20HISTORY.rtf
2. Honoré Bovet, Arbre des Batailles, Illumination by Loyset Liédet, (1461-1467), ms. 9079, fol. 10v, Koninklijke Bibliotheek Brussel.





Prelude: Emperor Dieter IV and the end of the Stirland Dynasty

After the death of Emperor Magnus (2369), the crown did not pass to his brother, Gunther von Bildhofen, but to Elector Count Leopold von Krieglitz of the Stirland House of Unfähiger. In 2411, his grandson Dieter succeeded him, but proved to be a vain, corrupt, ineffective, and incompetent ruler, earning him the nicknames der Fette (the Fat) and der Faule (the Lazy/Idle).

1.Emperor Dieter IV with full regalia

(http://i.imgur.com/ynad1F1.jpg)

His focus was the reconstruction of Nuln, the Imperial capital at the time, as a grandiose and beautiful metropolis. Nearly half of the city was demolished to create space for the Palace of Gold. He also neglected the defence of the Empire, diverting funds from the Imperial military towards his extravagant building plans.

2. The Psalter of Dieter IV.

(http://i.imgur.com/l6VjrQH.jpg)

This is the first page of a Psalter was produced by Johannes Mallard and presented to the Emperor when still residing in Nuln. Dieter, reading the Psalter in the lavish surroundings of the Palace of Gold, is looking to the reader – who was of course himself! The Classical text reads: Beatus vir qui non abiit in consilio impiorum, et in via peccatorum non stetit, et in cathedra pestilentiæ non sedit (Blessed is the man who does not guide his steps by ill counsel, or turn aside where sinners walk, or, where scornful souls gather, sit down to rest). Dieter himself has added in the margin: Nota quis sit beatus (Look who is blessed) - an extraordinary display of smugness and vanity!




1. Henry VIII on an illuminated plea roll of the Court of the King's Bench from 1544. Public Record Office, London.
2. Henry VIII’s Psalter, London c. 1540, by Jean Mallard or Mallart. The British Library, London
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 17, 2013, 06:55:34 PM
Due to Dieter’s policies, the Empire was largely unprepared in the face of the Waaagh! Grom (2420-2024). The Dwarfs were the first to bear the brunt of the Greenskin onslaught, and, hard pressed, High King Bragarik sent an envoy to the Empire for help. Dieter IV refused. Instead, although the enemy had yet to reach the Empire, he quickly transferred the Imperial court from Nuln towards Altdorf, in order to be as far as possible from the future threat. The Elector Counts were told to defend themselves. While Nuln and the Palace of Gold were soon destroyed and large parts of the Empire laid to waste, Dieter IV in Altdorf proved more interested in creating the Imperial Menagerie than in managing the Empire.

After the Waaagh!, much of the Empire lay waste, the economy was ruined and state revenues had virtually run dry. For his unending plans of luxury, Dieter had to find new means of income. He looked to Marienburg, which had been largely spared from the war. 

In 2429, Emperor Dieter IV visited Marienburg receiving a magnificent welcome. In the fields before the Oostenpoort, the most elaborate arrangements for the accommodation of the Emperor and his large retinue, had been erected, including a temporary palace, modeled on the Palace of Gold in Nuln (destroyed in the Waaagh). The Emperor would have wept when he first saw the replica.
Because of the sumptuousness of the materials used for the tents, pavilions and other furnishings, the terrain became known as “the Field of the Cloth of Gold”. He also received substantial bribes from the city, which was subsequently granted its independence.

1. The Field of the Cloth of Gold

(http://i.imgur.com/a4cmJcr.jpg)


The painting shows only the eastern part of Marienburg; the western part and the entrance of the river Reik are not visible. Various events are portrayed simultaneously. In the foreground, the Emperor enters Marienburg in procession through the Oostenpoort. To the right is the temporary Palace of Gold. Two fountains in front of the palace provided wine and beer for people's consumption (the overindulgence of which leads some of the figures in the painting being sick or engaging in brawling). Behind the temporary palace are the Emperor’s golden dining tent and the ovens and tents in which the his meals were prepared. In the centre background, the Emperor and the Directorate hold talks, and in the right background a tournament is taking place, with the Emperor and Staadtholder watching from the side.

(http://i.imgur.com/oFEayVd.jpg)


The detail shows Emperor Dieter IV and  the Staadtholder of Marienburg, protected by Altdorf Halberdiers and preceded by the Imperial Champion, holding the Sword of Justice.

Although commissioned by Dieter himself, the anonymous painter seems to have included several subversive scenes, an indication of the general anger and indignation.

(http://i.imgur.com/7ilOzAk.jpg)

In the air, top left, one can see the young dragon2 procured by Marienburg from an unknown source. Not that it ever actually flew during the visit, the Directorate being far too concerned that it might fly away. It is said that this "gift" for the Imperial Menagerie, established by Dieter, really swayed the Emperor to release Marienburg from the Empire.
(Below the dragon is Rijker’s Isle with its fortifications, and in the distance the contours of Fort Reaver - probably just a scholarly reference, as it is highly  unlikely that it would ever be visible from Marienburg).

(http://i.imgur.com/txjJhRQ.jpg)

In this scene (right hand middle), a vehicle commonly used to transport bullion is speeding out of sight – a clear reference to the gold transports from Marienburg to Altdorf after the visit.

(http://i.imgur.com/01CsUfM.jpg)

At the corner of the  jousting field stands a tree of honour, with coats of arms turning in the wind. Or in other words: turncoats. Note also that the tree of honour is barren.


Finally, a number of scenes can reasonably be interpreted as harlots conducting their business.  Hardly unknown at such occasions – but perhaps also a reference to the Empire selling its body?



1. The Field of the Cloth of Gold (anonymous painting, Flemish School, ca. 1545), Royal Collection.
On 7 to 24 June 1520, a meeting between Henry VIII (of England) and Francis I (of France) took place, near Guisnes to the south of Calais. The meeting became known as the Field of the Cloth of Gold, because of the sumptuousness of the materials used for the tents, pavilions and other furnishings.

2. This ‘dragon’ was a kite made by the English from canvas stretched around wooden hoops. It was pulled across the sky at the end of a long rope tethered to a carriage. Eyewitnesses reported that the dragon’s eyes blazed and its mouth hissed which suggests that it might have been filled with fireworks.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fandir Nightshade on October 17, 2013, 09:27:51 PM
This is great stuff....
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Zygmund on October 18, 2013, 08:44:47 AM
Prime stuff, best thing in years.

-Z
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 18, 2013, 02:32:10 PM
The scandal of an entire Imperial province breaking away with the Emperor's permission was so shocking that the Elector Counts demanded Dieter to appear before them to answer to the charges  in an emergency meeting in the Volkshalle in Altdorf.  The Emperor chose not to appear, but fled the city instead. As a result, the outraged Electors unanimously deposed Dieter IV .

1. From the Decree of Disposition (Reichstagsakten III, Nr. 204):
Quote
In Sigmars namen. Wir Johann von Sigmars gnaden erczlector der heiligen kirchen zu Nulne des heiligen richs erczkanczeler.

(…) als unser herren und middekorfursten des heiligen richs und auch wir von (…)den durchluchtigen fursten hern Dieter kaiser und kurfürst von Stirland von langer czijt here dicke und ernstlich davon ermanet und ersucht han (…) daz er dem heiligen riche ny zu fridden gehulffen hait (…) daz yme als eynem voygde und schirmer des riches zubehorte (…).

So hait er auch daz heilige rich swerlich und schedelichen entgledet und entgleden laßen, nemelich Marienburg und daz Westerland, daz deme heiligen riche zugehoret und daz riche großen nucz und urber davon gehabt hait, darinne der von Nordland eyn dyner und amptmann ist des heiligen richs, den er nu widder gelt synen titel und gelimp genommen.
(...)

Und wir Johann erczlector vorgenant, Sigmar zu dem ersten angeruffen, in gerichtes stad geseßen in namen und wegen unsere vorgeschriben herren und middekorfursten des heiligen richs und auch unser selbes umbe diße egenanten und andere vile großer gebresten und sachen uns darczu bewegende abethun und abeseczen mit dißem unserme orteil, daz wir thun und geben in dißer schrifft, den vorgenanten hern Dieter als eynen unnüczen, versümelichen, unachtbaren entgleder und unwerdigen hanthaber des heiligen richs von demselben riche und von alle der wirde, eren und herlichkeid darczu gehörende und verkundigen darumbe allen fursten, herren, ritteren, knechten, Steden, landen und luden des heiligen richs, daz sy nu furbaßer ire eyde und hulde, die sy des vorgenannten hern Dieter personen als von des heiligen richs wegen gethan hant, zumal und genczlichen ledig sint (…).

Quote
In the name of Sigmar. We Johann by the grace of Sigmar Archlector of the Holy Church in Nuln, Arch-Chancellor of the Holy Empire of Sigmar.

(...) our Lords and fellow Elector Counts and we too have the illustrious prince, lord Dieter, Emperor and Elector Count of Stirland, since long often and in earnest admonished (…) and urged (…) that he failed to restore the peace in the Holy Empire, which befalls on him as steward and protector of the Empire ( …)

That he also has severely and to its great detriment dismembered  the Holy Empire, namely Marienburg  and the Westerland which belong to the Holy Empire and which are of great gain and benefit to the Empire, and furthermore deprived for money the Lord of Nordland, a servant and official of the Holy Empire of his title and rights.
(...)

And we Johann, aforementioned Archlector, having first called upon Sigmar, sitting in judgement in the name of and for our Lords Electors of the Empire and also ourselves, for these and many other serious errors and matters dethrone and depose with this our judgment that we pronounce and give in this decree Lord Dieter as a useless, lazy, careless dismemberer and unworthy caretaker of the Holy Empire from the same Empire and all its related honours, titles and glories, and announce therefore to all the princes, nobles, knights, servants, cities, lands and peoples that they from now are released utterly and completely from their oath and allegiance which they have made to the person of the aforementioned Lord Dieter as well as because of the Holy Empire (…).

Copies of the Decree, signed and sealed by all the Electors (except, of course, Dieter IV) were immediately sent to all provinces and city-states of the realm. Dieter first tried to find shelter in Nuln and then Stirland, but both refused. Some say that this was in fact Dieter's choice, as, still suffering from the destructions of the war, they could not provide the shelter of luxury Dieter was looking for.

In another twist of the political wheel, however, he found refuge in Talabheim (v. infra), where he stayed under virtual house arrest, until his death in 2434. Never acknowledging his deposition, he insisted to the last to be called “Imperial Highness”. But true to character, he never attempted to regain the throne. Although the story goes that he choked on a fishbone from a Marienburg goldfish, he probably died of a stroke in his sleep.

2. Dieter in his later years, playing the harp with his jester (in reality a spy of Wilhelm III).

(http://i.imgur.com/UmrQ0zo.jpg)


1. Mutatis mutandis otherwise verbatim from the Decree of Disposition of Wenceslaus III (1400) Reichstagsakten III, Nr. 204, p. 254 ff.
2. Henry VIII’s Psalter, London c. 1540. The British Library, London
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 19, 2013, 12:28:39 PM
An Assessment of Dieter IV:

De mortuis nil nisi bene. If this adagium is indeed true, many will argue that this paragraph should end right here. It certainly cannot be denied that Dieter’s reign proved a major disaster for the Empire, whereby the long-term effects of Marienburg’s secession probably even outweigh the destruction inflicted by Grom’s Waaagh. Much of the responsibility falls to Dieter himself, not really because of incompetence, but because of egotism. This seems to have been his major character flaw. He was not interested in state affairs or the defence of the realm, but in comfort and luxury, art and architecture. His main fault is the failure to recognise that the first is the prerequisite for the latter: its neglection will in the end ruin both.

1. The Empire after the Waaagh: destitute and in ruins.

(http://i.imgur.com/4rhy9mh.jpg)

Note Grom's fleet in the background being ravaged by the storm and swept out to the Western Ocean. The angel indicates that the storm is being interpreted as the divine wrath of Sigmar. 


The Arch-Chancellor Johann of Nuln seems to have blamed this on Dieter’s roots, as he was overheard on many an occasion muttering in despair: “What else to expect from a shoeless Stirlander?”. Presumably he meant that as relatively poor and provincial Stirlanders, the Krieglitzers were ill equipped to deal with a rise from rags to riches (or as the Stirlanders themselves say “from shoeless to slip-shoes”.2 In addition, he may have been referring to the joke that Stirlanders wear no shoes because they would in any case “völlig neben den Schuhen stehen” (stand completely beside their shoes), i.e. to be confused. Or in short: shoeless=clueless.

If Dieter IV lacked good judgment, he does not seem to have lacked good taste – and we do not mean his gluttony. His generous patronage of arts and architecture sparked off somewhat of a renaissance, The sad irony is the same policies ensured that this renaissance was very short-lived indeed – sometimes literally. Many of the artists and architects he sponsored  were killed and most of their works destroyed in a Waaagh, which might have been prevented, if the defence of the realm had not been neglected.

As ruler, Dieter IV was ineffective and irresponsible; as a man self-centred and self-indulging. He was the wrong man in the wrong place at the wrong time. But he was not evil, cruel or malicious. His reign was not marred by terror or atrocities (at least not his own). He is not known to have ordered the torture or murder of his enemies, let alone innocents. Neither did he maltreat his kin, his servants or the common man. Although he raised taxes for his extravagancies, they were not collected with undue harshness. The few times he presided over the Imperial Court, his judgements were sound and just.

This forgotten side of Dieter IV was apparently also recognised by Wilhelm III, who put him under only the mildest form of house arrest, instead of eliminating once and for all this potential threat to his throne.

3. The last (extant) portrait of Dieter IV by Hannes Hohlbein
 
(http://i.imgur.com/RZaV8OT.jpg)




1. From Breve trattato delle afflittioni d'Italia et del conflitto di Roma con pronosticatione. (1525) Spencer Collection Ms. 081, f. 3v
3. Note that slip-shoes are about the cheapest footwear available!
3. Portrait of Henry VIII (by or after Hans Holbein ca. 1540), National Gallery, London




Digression: The Imperial Menagerie

As the most visible and known legacy of Dieter IV, it seems proper to add some words here about the Imperial Menagerie. In 2503, the famous artist Albrecht Dierer visited Altdorf and wrote in his diary: Ich hab gesehen ins Kaysers Haus zu Altdorf hinten hinaus die Brunnen, Labyrinth, Thiergarten, daß ich lustiger Ding, mir gefälliger, gleich einem Paradies, nie gesehen hab. 
(I saw in the Emperor’s  house in Altdorf out at the back the fountains, labyrinth, menagerie; a more enjoyable and attractive thing, like a Paradise, I have not seen.)

The diary also contained these drawings of the grounds and some of the animals in the Imperial menagerie:

1.
(http://i.imgur.com/aziAlgJ.jpg)

Note the joustig area and the labyrinth in the foreground.

2.
(http://i.imgur.com/VcBaQZW.jpg)

3.
(http://i.imgur.com/JGMztPl.png)

Dierer also made this etching of the Monstrous Sow of Landser, a pig possessing a single head with two tongues and 4 ears, two bodies and 8 legs.

4.
(http://i.imgur.com/AYiwJy9.jpg)


Last but not least, he made this woodcut of two of the major attractions: the Abomination of Stirland and the Spawn of Hochland.

5.
(http://i.imgur.com/BPdi2LK.png)

The Emperor himself is giving a guided tour to foreign dignitaries, who are suitably impressed. The Abomination (known by its caretakers as Mathi) can easily be identified as a chaos hydra.

Albrecht Dierer himself has not left us a picture of the Imperial dragon – most likely because the animal was still injured from a fight with a lion, some days before. However, this incident, in which one caretaker was killed and several injured, was captured by a Tilean artist.

6.
(http://i.imgur.com/TvmsMa6.jpg)



1-2. Albrecht Dürer: The Menagerie at the Coudenberg Palace in Brussels and some of its animals. Akademie der bildenden Künste, Wien. The quote in the text (adjusted) is from Albrecht Dürers Tagebuch der niederländischen Reise (1521).
3. Albrecht Dürer: Rhinoceron (1515). British Museum, London.
4. Albrecht Dürer: Die wunderbare Sau von Landser (1496). Metropolitan Museum, New York.
5. Albrecht Dürer: The Revelation of St John, scene 11 (1498). Staatliche Kunsthalle, Karlsruhe.
6. Leonardo da Vinci: Dragon fighting with lion. Uffizi, Firenze.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Durloth on October 19, 2013, 04:08:08 PM
Brilliant work! Color me impressed...
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 19, 2013, 10:25:08 PM
Impressed  :icon_wink:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 20, 2013, 02:43:01 PM
The Empire under the Reikland Dynasty: Wilhelm III.

1. Dieter IV handing over the Sceptre of the Realm to Wilhelm III. Painting from the Volkshalle in Altdorf, 2436.

(http://i.imgur.com/LEgadLb.jpg)

As so often in earlier art, the picture is portraying several events simultaneously. In the lower band, Dieter IV hands over the Sceptre of the Realm to Wilhem III, in the presence of the Elector Counts and other Princes of the Empire. Note that only Wilhelm bears the title of Imperator, not Dieter who has been given only the imperial honorific Augustus, indicating his deposition.

(http://i.imgur.com/jup1uJ3.jpg)

In the upper band, Dieter IV and Wilhelm III together inspect the troops of the different provinces, who acclaim the new Emperor. 

None of this ever happened!
 
As we have seen, Dieter IV fled Altdorf to finally end up in Talabheim, and never acknowledged his deposition. Besides, Dieter IV was far to fat to sit in full armour on a horse (even if anyone could make a suit of armour that would actually fit). Note also the anachronistic use of the double-headed eagle as the imperial coat of arms. The double-headed eagle (merging the eagles of the Principality of Reikland and the house of Holswig-Schliestein) was introduced by Wilhelm III himself some time after his election as the imperial emblem. It succesfully replaced previous emblems, and thus Wilhelm III created a powerful symbol of his and his family’s claim to the imperial crown. 

Indeed, the whole painting is pure propaganda of Wilhelm III to support these claims, by suggesting that the election of Wilhem III enjoyed unanimous support, including from the deposed Dieter IV! It is probably no coincidence that the painting dates from after the death of Dieter IV, when he was no longer in a position to contradict this portrayal of events.


1. (Part of) The Meeting of Henry VIII and the Emperor Maximilian I (anonymous painting, Flemish School, ca. 1520, Royal Collection).
In 1513, both Henry VIII and HR Emperor Maximilian were part of the Holy League against France. In Aug 1513, while Henry was laying siege to Therouanne, both rulers met in person, in Aire-sur-la-Lys, on French soil. Maximilian's followers are still dressed in black in mourning for his wife Bianca Maria Sforza. Henry hosted Maximilian at a tent with a gallery of cloth-of-gold at his camp over the weekend beginning, 13 August 1513. According to the chronicles, the weather on the day of the meeting was the "foulest ever."
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: S.O.F on October 20, 2013, 05:04:31 PM
Lovely stuff, though your dates are off as I think you mean 2436 for the 'Volkshalle' painting.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 20, 2013, 08:05:11 PM
Ah yes, of course. Amended.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 21, 2013, 02:38:20 PM
Election and Coronation

The remarkable unanimity of the Electors on the deposition of Dieter IV soon changed to a more customary animosity, once the question of the actual succession had to be solved. The two contenders for the throne were:

1. the cousin of Dieter IV, Wilhelm Holswig-Schliestein, Grand-Duke of Reikland, Prince of Altdorf

(http://i.imgur.com/GIZLQHZ.jpg)

Wilhelm is depicted wearing the ceremonial hat of an Elector Count.

2. Frederik Untermensch, Grand-Duke of Talabecland.

(http://i.imgur.com/cFyXJ8x.jpg)


1. Friedrich III, as Arch-Duke, by an anonymous painter (ca. 1460), Stift Vorau.
2. Markgraf Christoph I. von Baden, by Hans Baldung Grien (1515). München, Alte Pinakothek.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 22, 2013, 09:58:55 AM
With only a single vote more in favour of Wilhelm, the result could not have been closer. Three electoral votes, however, had not been cast: the two votes (Westerland and Stirland) belonging to Dieter IV, who for obvious reasons did not participate in the election, and the vote of the Elder of the Moot, who had been too busy preparing the Coronation Banquet.
Some historians interpret the result as an indication of a religious rift, as the “Ulrician” vote went en bloc to Frederik.

However, the result would not have been so close, if the Grand-Duke of Talabecland had not secured some “Sigmarite” votes (like Werner von Falkenstein,  Arch-Lector of Talabheim). Besides, he himself, like so many of his countrymen, was primarily a follower of Taal, but hardly exclusive in his worship. Indeed, he provided generous funds to rebuild the Cathedral of Sigmar in Talabheim, severely damaged in the Waaagh, and donated for its reconsecration this painting by his favourite artist, Hans Baldung Grien.


1. Grand-Duke Frederik Untermensch and his family in adoration of the young Sigmar.

(http://i.imgur.com/m1tuheR.jpg)

Behind Frederik,  Arch-lector Werner of Talabheim is kneeling, and next to the Grand-Duchess Ottilia von Katzenelnbogen we can see the Abbess of the Sisters of Sigmar in Talabheim. Note that the Grand-Duke is wearing the Talabheim colors.

One should not forget that foremost on the Electors’ minds was the problem that caused the Election of a new Emperor in the first place: the secession of Marienburg. We believe that the Electors choice was decided by their views on how to deal with that problem and that Frederik and Wilhelm represented alternative strategies. Both had distinguished themselves in the Waaagh, but in different ways.

The Grand-Duke of Talabecland had bravely (according to his detractors: reckless) taken the Greenskins head-on, achieving several victories in open battle over Grom’s subordinate commanders, before being defeated by Grom himself. Even in defeat, he managed to withdraw in good order to Talabheim, where he withstood all subsequent attacks.

Wilhelm, far more cautious, had always carefully (according to his detractors: cowardly)  avoided open battle, ambushing only small and dispersed enemy elements. Thus he had remained undefeated, securing many but rather inglorious victories. By having the bridges over the Reik destroyed, he had also diverted the main force away from Reikland, limiting the destruction there.

Basically, the Electors had to ponder which strategy would work best to bring Marienburg back into the Empire. In our opinion, it was not religious, but psychological reasons that made the Ulricians (with their “Crush the weak” attitude) to support Frederik. Most Sigmarites, on the other hand, preferred a more cautious approach, that would keep economy and trade in mind, and not end up slaughtering the goose with the golden eggs.

The economic state of the Empire still recovering from the Waaagh will also have played a significant role. The Emperor was supposed to finance revenue shortfalls himself, before trying to raise taxes or introduce new ones. As the economy and finances of Reikland were in a comparatively better state than most of the Empire,a electing Wilhelm reduced the chances of an increased tax burden for the other provinces.

To avoid any uncertainty over the status of Dieter IV, Wilhelm was crowned the same day in the Cathedral of Altdorf by the Grand-Theogonist.

2. The Coronation of Wilhelm III by the Grand-Theogonist.

(http://i.imgur.com/KTgDNn6.jpg)

and as depicted in the Grosse Chronik des Imperiums:

(http://i.imgur.com/s1KpZVd.jpg)

3. Wilhelm III with full regalia.

(http://i.imgur.com/HaoApLr.jpg)

Wilhelm is wearing the Imperial Crown, the Sceptre of the Realm, the Griffon-Chain and the Sword of Sigismund (instead of his EC Runefang). Note the coat of arms of the house Holswig-Schliestein and of the Reiksguard (founded by Wilhelm III and nominally commanded by the ruling Emperor).
 
4. The Coronation Banquet.

(http://i.imgur.com/1KlU2PE.jpg)

Upper right: the Emperor sitting with the Arch-Chancellor, Johann of Nuln, and the Ecclesiastical Electors. Halflings are tending the tables.

5. The Elder of the Moot, Erz-Truchsess (Arch-Steward) of the Empire, performing his High Office at the Coronation Banquet.

(http://i.imgur.com/7wVXKRl.jpg)




a.With the noted exception of Marienburg. Of course, the fact that they had suffered little to nothing in the Waaagh contributed greatly to their desire and ability to secede.


1. Markgrafentafel by Hans Baldung Grien (around 1511). Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe. On the left is Margrave Christoph I von Baden with nine sons, and on the right his wife, Ottilie von Katzenelnbogen with five daughters.
2. The Coronation of Friedrich III by Pope Nicolaus V, by the Master of the St. Barbara Legend, recently identified as Aert van den Bossche (16 century) Westfalisches Landesmuseum Münster. The miniature depicting the same coronation is from "Les Vigiles de Charles VII" Bib. Nat. Paris, Fr. 5054, fol. 224.
3. Emperor Friedrich III. Attributed to Hans Burgkmair d. Ä. (ca. 1468) Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien.
4. Banquet of Emperor Friedrichs III. and Duke Charles the Bold, from: Die große Burgunderchronik des Diebold Schilling von Bern, 1474-1483, Zentralbibliothek Zürich.
5. Playing Card, perhaps owned by Ladislaus Posthumus (ca. 1460) Wien, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: S.O.F on October 23, 2013, 02:24:30 AM
Again great stuff sir though one question perhaps pertaining to your own construction of the often muddled and contradictory Empire history:

the two votes (Westerland and Stirland) belonging to Dieter IV, who for obvious reasons did not participate in the election,

At the deposition of Dieter the Westerland had no direct electoral vote. The 'Grand' title, Electorship, and Runefang had passed to the Barons of Nordland with the death of Graf Paulus van der Maacht during the Great War.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 23, 2013, 08:26:16 AM
Thank you for the compliment and the comment. As you say, the history is often muddled and contradictory. I have based this on the history of Marienburg and Westerland as given in "Marienburg - Sold down the River".

According to this source (p. 19), the last Baron of Westerland, Paulus van der Maacht, had died without heir while serving in Magnus the Pious's army in Kislev. There were numerous claims, often highly tenuous, to the province and its vast welath. The ruling families of both Talabecland and Nordland had reasonable claims, but Emperor Magnus feared that offering the province to any great family would be regarded as an insult by the other and result in civil war. When the merchants of Marienburg came up with a proposal of a directorate, the "Emperor, according to legend, prayed hard for several days and nights. In the end, he agreed and declared the Barony ceased, renaming it the Province of Westerland and placing the merchants in charge. All seemed to be in order, and things ran so smoothly that subsequent Emperors came to take Marienburg for granted and largely forgot about it".

Nordland obviously has maintained its claim (which is why the ruler of Nordland is forbidden to enter Marienburg under pain of death), but this was apparently never officially accepted by any Emperor.   
It is not specified what happened to the Runefang or the Electoral Vote by this source (nor any other?). Clearly, the Directorate or Staadtholder never held the Electoral vote. And as granting the Runefang/Electoral vote to any ruling family would amount to an acceptance of its claims to Westerland, I have chosen the option that Magnus retained the Electoral Vote (and RF) himself (thus strengthening the Emperor's position), which then would be passed to the reigning Emperor. 
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time
Post by: S.O.F on October 23, 2013, 12:40:37 PM
Thank you for the compliment and the comment. As you say, the history is often muddled and contradictory. I have based this on the history of Marienburg and Westerland as given in "Marienburg - Sold down the River".

Ah that is a fine book, shame the newest edition of WHFRP stuff is no where near as good.

Quote
Nordland obviously has maintained its claim (which is why the ruler of Nordland is forbidden to enter Marienburg under pain of death), but this was apparently never officially accepted by any Emperor.   
It is not specified what happened to the Runefang or the Electoral Vote by this source (nor any other?). Clearly, the Directorate or Staadtholder never held the Electoral vote. And as granting the Runefang/Electoral vote to any ruling family would amount to an acceptance of its claims to Westerland, I have chosen the option that Magnus retained the Electoral Vote (and RF) himself (thus strengthening the Emperor's position), which then would be passed to the reigning Emperor.

The Runefang bit is the only part I think that has sources to back it up, though which one it is in eludes me at the moment. In general though the Westerland had a Runefang to which must have passed to Nordland as it had no Runefang to begin with and the Drakwald and Solland Runefangs are kept in the Imperial armory.

The latter half is the real issue as there are notes to their being an Elector of Nordland well before 2302. In my mind it always makes the most sense to have Nordland become officially recognized as a Grand Province as part of Magnus's reforms. As for historical mentions of 'Elector of Nordland' I always like to assume that, especially during the civil wars, it is one of the rival Emperors setting a rump 'Westerland' Elector up in Salzenmund to suit there own political ends.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 23, 2013, 04:39:01 PM
The main problem seems to be that some sources (like WFRP Sigmar's Heirs ), name Westerland as one of the original 12 provinces, instead of Nordland. However, I am not aware of any source ever mentioning (part of) Westerland changing its name to Nordland. Indeed, looking at the map, it would be quite odd to have the northern part of the Empire being called Westerland (west of what?).

Marienburg and the Wasteland (i.e. what is usually known as Westerland) only joined the Empire in 501, at the time of Sigismund II. The WFRP Marienburg mentions (p. 21) that Marius, the founder of Marienburg leads his people, the Jutones, westward from Nordland. Theoretically that could be a geographical, not political term, but that is unlikely, as the book continues that in 501: "The King of the Jutones becomes an Imperial noble, the Baron of Westerland", implying that Westerland is a new creation. If he had unseated an existing Baron of Westerland, I would assume it to be reflected somewhere. As a new (north-western) part of the Empire, it does make more sense to call it Westerland.

That the new Baron would have an Electoral Vote does not pose a problem, as new EV were created at several occasions. But a Runefang does pose a problem, given that Marienburg joined well after the Runefangs were created. As far as I am aware, the only reference to a Marienburg RF is that Helmar of Marienburg beheaded Konrad von Carstein with his Runefang. However, given the date of the reported event (2121), this could be either the Drakwald or Solland Runefang, as by that date both provinces were extinct. The most logical assumption would be that, at some point after these provinces were dissolved, one of these Runefangs was given to the Baron of Westerland (being a temporal EC). It then returned to the Imperial Armoury, when the cessation of the Barony of Westerland was declared by Magnus.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (22/10)
Post by: S.O.F on October 24, 2013, 12:13:47 AM
The sources are now in disagreement after the Black Library works on the Life of Sigmar and the Age of Legends series which followed as these drastically altered the set up of the lands that would become the Empire during the Age of Sigmar. By these newer accounts (which Sigmar's Heirs is part of) the Reik estuary was inhabited by the Endals at the time of Sigmar, staunch allies of the Unberogens and among the first to join Sigmar's cause. Their capital was Marburg and it's placement roughly congruent with Marienburg. The Jutones are still included but now only hold the upper parts of the Cursed Marshes, driven there by the Norsii, who were then the inhabitants of Nordland, and Teutogens. They as per the old fluff refuse the call to Blackfire Pass but in the years after Marius Fen-Wolf is forced to bend knee to Sigmar. As Sigmar's confederates drive the Norsii across the Sea of Claws some Jutones and other settlers move back into Nordland and it becomes a distinct geographic region. Also Marius marries the heiress to the line of the Endals and the Jutone and Endal lands are joined in personal union.

However this still leaves a myriad of problems with other background, particularly Sigismund the Conqueror. My own interpretation of this is that though Marius submitted to Sigmar's rule their lands, at least in the Cursed Marshes had never been formally incorporated into the Empire and that in 501 a war was fought between those hold outs that refused to recognize full Imperial rule  and the Emperor. When the war was concluded, the Marshes along with the lands of the Endals on the other bank of the Reik, which had been part of the Empire since it's founding, were combined under the title of (Grand) Barony Westerland. As for mentions of Electors of Nordland before 2301, I always think the easiest answer is that the senior branch, be they in Marienburg or Salzenmund, would hold the Electoral title. As lines do die out from time to time this would see the Electorship passing back and forth from the Barons of Salzenmund and Marienburg over the millennium between the founding and today. Thus in 2301 the senior branch was the  van der Maacht's of Marienburg and after his death the Electorship passed to the Baron's of Nordland but rather than a new Cadet branch be set up to rule, it was given to the burghers, though the Nordland Baron's retained the title of Prince of Marienburg.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 24, 2013, 01:46:55 PM
Theoretically, that could explain the references to Elector Counts of Nordland before 2301. So far, I have found references for Elector Counts of Marienburg/Westerland in the years 897/1979/2100, and for Elector Counts of Nordland in 1244/1375/1414/2150. According to your view, the Electoral title would therefore have shifted (at least) four times. Well, five really, as we all seem to assume that the last Baron of Westerland was also an EC.

However, the theory raises more questions than it answers. The (temporal) Electoral title is linked to a specific province, not a family. That the title could shift between family branches within a province is certainly feasible - but between provinces not so much. If the Baron of Nordland was the heir to the Grand-Barony of Westerland (or vice versa), why should he inherit only title, not the land? Why does he not simply become Elector-Count of Westerland and Baron of Nordland in personal union?  Why should Westerland/Nordland be an exception to this basic rule? Sure, political expediency might in exceptional circumstances require to split the title from the lands – but on several occasions? Without any reference in history? And if the buck had been frequently passed between Westerland and Nordland, why should it suddenly become a problem in 2301?
Of course, if we could find a source that mentions contemporary ECs of Westerland and Nordland, the issue would be settled beyond doubt.
Title: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/10)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 24, 2013, 02:36:25 PM
The First Campaign against Marienburg


The first orders given by the new Emperor were to send word of his election to all provinces, as well as an Imperial summons for Dieter, Elector Count of Stirland, to appear within a month before the Imperial court. In addition, scouts were dispatched to locate the former Emperor and reinforcements to some strategic border areas, in case unfriendly neighbours would test the resolve of the new ruler.

Given the circumstances of Dieter’s deposition, the new Emperor Wilhelm knew he had no choice but to try and return Marienburg to the Empire. Unfortunately, things came sooner ahead than Wilhelm III may have wanted, when in an escalating local conflict, Marienburg forces occupied the Duchy of Siert within Reikland. The Emperor immediately assembled the available forces and marched along the Reik towards Siert. He was hoping to for a quick success, as his best troops had just been dispatched to the borders.

(http://i.imgur.com/MBHblPV.jpg)

1. Wilhelm III and his troops leave from Altdorf to face the Marienburgers. The tunic of the Emperor and the trappings of his horse are adorned with hives and bees. On the edge, you can read the motto "NON UTITUR ACULEO REX CUI PAREMUR", which means "the king that we obey will not use the point of his sting." The coat of many soldiers is decorated with a porcupine. The porcupine is known for its ability to direct its spikes to defend itself. However, the king bee is stingless has no defence. Since ancient times, it is the symbol of political and social harmony. The warlike king is peaceful here. It is not insignificant that only soldiers wear the emblem of the porcupine.


As a token of good will, Wilhelm had given command of his small naval force to his rival in the election, Grand-Duke Frederik. His orders were to monitor and report any movement of the enemy on and along the Reik, in particular reinforcements from Marienburg, and, if required, to disembark upstream and attack the enemy in the rear. 

After the defeat of the Imperial Navy in the Waaagh, and the secession of Marienburg, the main base of the Imperial Navy, the fleet consisted only of smaller vessels and merchant ships, which initially caught Frederik’s disdain.  However, while sailing up the Reik, it struck Frederik that this could be used to his advantage, and he devised a daring plan to infiltrate Marienburg. However, he did not request permission, or even inform the Emperor of his plans. Disguised as a merchant fleet (with arms supplies for Marienburg!), he was allowed to enter Marienburg. The gates were too heavily guarded, but it transpired that the Kasteel on Rijker’s Isle was undermanned. As Marienburg expected little threat from the sea, they had moved most of the garrison to reinforce the city itself. If Frederik could occupy the fortress, he would gain a stranglehold on the rebellious city. Only now did he sent word of his plans to the Emperor, telling him to march as soon as possible against Marienburg. Under the cover of darkness, he landed on Rijker’s Isle, preparing to attack at first dawn.

(http://i.imgur.com/8WPlgWf.jpg)

2. The Imperial troops are preparing to attack the Kasteel, under the auspices of Sigmar and Myrmidia. The Banners, and the tunics of three soldiers, have a crowned porcupine. In the distance, the Imperial fleet pass off the rocky coast of Rijker’s Isle.


Against all odds, the raid proved successful, but, recognising the threat, the Directorate reacted vigorously and immediately organised an all out attack by all available troops of Marienburg to retake the fortress. While the Imperial forces were able to withstand the first assaults, without reinforcements, it was clearly only a matter of time before they would have to surrender. 

(http://i.imgur.com/xk1lVF7.jpg)

3. The Marienburgers, recognizable by their banners adorned with the figure of Manaan, try to recapture the Kasteel. To the right you can see part of Marienburg.


And those reinforcements would not be forthcoming soon. Wilhelm III was stuck at Siert: although he had beaten the Marienburg troops, he was unable to retake the fortress for the Empire. Without a clear picture of the enemy force between him and marienburg (which Frederik had failed to provide), he was unwilling to leave a sizeable enemy contingent in his rear. And obviously, he was also enraged at the blatant disregard of his orders and the tone of Frederik’s message.

(http://i.imgur.com/azB8y4K.jpg)

4. Wilhelm and his army attack Siert. The tunic of the King and the trappings of his horse are more emblematic. Only the white tuft of the crest and the position of the horse identify the Emperor.


Unsure about the strength of Imperial forces, Marienburg sent emissaries to the Emperor. Amidst rumours about Dieter conspiring to return and realising that he was unable support the Kasteel, which would therefore soon fall, Wilhelm feared that he might end up with empty hands altogether. So, referring to the motto "NON UTITUR ACULEO REX CUI PAREMUR", he accepted a truce, whereby both armies withdrew from each others territory.

(http://i.imgur.com/4RNCKPL.jpg)

5. The representatives of Marienburg, dressed in black kneel before the grace of Wilhelm III.


As the representatives of Marienburg had knelt before him, Wilhelm claimed that Marienburg had been paying homage to him as its feudal liege, which allowed him to return as victor to Altdorf. Needless to say, Marienburg had a different opinion. As did the Grand-Duke of Talabecland.

(http://i.imgur.com/T7mjoay.jpg)


All pictures are illustrations by Jean Bourdichon for "Le Voyage de Gênes" (the Journey to Genoa) by Jean Marot (ca. 1508), which recounts the campaign of the French King Louis XII against Genoa in 1507.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/10)
Post by: Shadespyre on October 24, 2013, 06:59:29 PM
Very clever, very educational and above all very interesting. Please keep it up!  :eusa_clap:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/10)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 24, 2013, 07:59:24 PM
God willing, this history will be continued until and including the reign of Karl Franz. I must admit, though, I am very much inclined to disregard the Storm of Chaos storyline.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time
Post by: S.O.F on October 25, 2013, 12:29:45 AM
However, the theory raises more questions than it answers. The (temporal) Electoral title is linked to a specific province, not a family. That the title could shift between family branches within a province is certainly feasible - but between provinces not so much. If the Baron of Nordland was the heir to the Grand-Barony of Westerland (or vice versa), why should he inherit only title, not the land? Why does he not simply become Elector-Count of Westerland and Baron of Nordland in personal union?  Why should Westerland/Nordland be an exception to this basic rule? Sure, political expediency might in exceptional circumstances require to split the title from the lands – but on several occasions? Without any reference in history? And if the buck had been frequently passed between Westerland and Nordland, why should it suddenly become a problem in 2301?
Of course, if we could find a source that mentions contemporary ECs of Westerland and Nordland, the issue would be settled beyond doubt.

Such is the problem with many of these contradictory background issues.

On the first count, perhaps we are wrong to assume the intrinsic link between 'lands' and an Electorship. Certainly there is a portion but arguably the greater importance is that the Elector's represent one of the founding tribes and a link back to Sigmar. In line with the thoughts put into the book 'Runefang' perhaps a great deal of the credibility of an Elector comes not only from holding an important demesne but that they also bear one of the great swords forged for the founding tribes chiefs. Considering the two fallen provinces, Drakwald and Solland, you have situations in which each is missing one of the components key to reinstatement, the Drakwald 's lands were so devastated and overrun by Beastmenthat it was absorbed into Middenland (by in large) despite it's Runefang still in the hands of the Emperor and Solland though also devastated by Greenskins of Gorbad Ironclaw they did not stay and occupy (unlike the Beasts) but had no Runefang. Thus if the Runefang is passed the to family with the closest relations to the original line that inherits the Runefang then perhaps the Electorship follows it. Thus at times the Prince in Marienburg bore the Runefang and when his line died the Prince of Salzenmund received it and also the title of Elector.   

To further flesh out my theory, the line of Marius and Endal Princess lasts some centuries but as true lines do it dies out and Nordland and Westerland are granted to cadet families with the senior granted the Runefang and the Electorship and the other nominal vassal of the other.


The lack of references is to be expected from the very spotty background but during the Civil War years I think it likely that rival Emperors created a myriad of 'Electors' on a whim. Perhaps some mention of an Elector of Nordland are not a true Runefang bearing elector but merely creation of the Middenheim Emperors to bolster their claim to the throne.

Lastly 2301 was a problem because the plethora of outstanding and long held rivalries between previously warring factions. The Baronial title was dissolved as the burghers and minor nobles in Westerland had no interest in being ruled by a now alien and very recently hostile Prince. The title for Marienburg was retained but the Baron of Nordland had no direct control over the region. WHFRP 2 fluff suggests that the Nordland Electors, Gausser in particular are keen to reunite these lands they feel are rightfully theirs and even suggests that if Gausser were to retake Marienburg he would reinstall the Niske family in Salzenmund as his vassals. (From Shades of Empire if you are curious)
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/10)
Post by: Gunman006 on October 25, 2013, 09:31:02 AM
That is awesome, strange but not uncommon that these fluff contradictions happen with multiple authors describing same time periods over and over again, maybe there is a lack of interest in researching other works before starting to write new novels or RP books.

Very nice written, I enjoyed it and it resparked my enthusiasm for the empire.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/10)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 25, 2013, 10:10:12 AM
@ Gunman006: yes, one gets the impression that GW treats their stories like their rules. Maybe they could issue fluff Errata & FAQ.  :icon_wink:
 
@ SOF: You have avoided the main objection: title, lands and Runefang (if there was one) are by right all part and parcel of the same inheritance.  Every time a direct line of a ruling family would die out, the rightful heir would inherit the lot: the title, the lands and the Runefang. These would be added in personal union to his existing titles and lands, to be handed down to his heir. I could imagine there being a special rule that an existing Elector Count can only ever possess a single vote and a single Runefang, and thus would only inherit the lands.  But there is no evidence for such a rule and, anyway, that would not be the case here. Edit: In fact, the Paths of the Damned 1 - Ashes of Middenheim p.5 mentions that the Counts of Middenheim held at one point two electoral votes (Middenheim and Middenland).

As I said above, exceptional circumstances may overrule this right - and  indeed it did after the death of Paulus van der Maacht. But as you yourself point out, that does not stop Gausser (with the best claims) to demand his inheritance anyway. To assume that this deviation would have happened already 5 times before in the case of Westerland/Nordland does not seem very convincing.

That rival Emperors may have created additional electors is indeed quite possible, but irrelevant, as our sources mention Elector Counts of Westerland and Nordland well before 1360, when the first anti-emperor (or rather anti-empress) arose. The most probable solution is simply that an early Emperor made either Westerland (most likely in 501) or Nordland (at some point prior to 1244; perhaps by transferring the Drakwald vote) a Grand-Barony/Electoral County (depending on which province one accepts as being original). The funny thing is that Sigmar's Heirs does not seem to say anything about how Nordland joined the Empire or became an Electoral County. 
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Gneisenau on October 26, 2013, 09:14:25 AM
This is fantastic! :::cheers::: Please keep it up.


Impressed

Should I be worried that I wanted to do the exact same joke?

I must admit, though, I am very much inclined to disregard the Storm of Chaos storyline.

The what?




:icon_wink:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time.
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 26, 2013, 12:06:23 PM
Should I be worried that I wanted to do the exact same joke?

Ungulate minds think alike, I guess.

The what?


Nothing really - just a whisper in the wind....
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 10, 2013, 03:35:51 PM
Added on previous page: Digression on the Imperial Menagerie.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: patsy02 on November 10, 2013, 04:55:25 PM
Quote
Frederik Untermensch

Quote
Untermensch
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 10, 2013, 05:05:13 PM
Not my invention - you need to address GW for that.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: BAWTRM on November 15, 2013, 12:39:31 PM
Wow Fidelis, this is absolutely great! Empire political fluff has always been quite a patchwork affair, but you're turning it into one grand epic historic tale! :eusa_clap:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: Commander Bernhardt on November 16, 2013, 01:24:38 PM
yes this is grand.
when can we read the next installment?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: Kirgan on November 17, 2013, 01:17:09 PM
 :::cheers::: :::cheers::: :::cheers::: :happy:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 17, 2013, 05:32:25 PM
Thanks to all for the encouragement. Coming soon on this Forum: the War of Succession.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/11)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 20, 2013, 01:22:36 PM
The War of Succession

Note: Although ill-suited for the events it is supposed to designate, the name has been in general use since the primary source “Das erste Buch der Chronik des Kaysers Wilhem des Dritten” (the First Book of the Chronicle of Emperor Wilhelm III) which will be followed here as well.

The Westerland campaign had lasted a little over a month, and the Imperial summons against Dieter IV had received no response. Nuln and Stirland had reported that Dieter IV had sought refuge there, which had been refused. Since then, there had been no word of the deposed Emperor. Upon his return, Wilhelm III called therefore an Imperial Diet to try the former Emperor for non-compliance and insubordination.

However, the trial did not exactly get off to a smooth start. Since the campaign, relations between Wilhelm and Frederik of Talabecland had been decidedly frosty, but now the latter’s simmering resentment erupted like a volcano. When the indictment against Dieter IV was read, Frederik rose from his seat and started to hurl angry accusations against the Emperor. If Dieter was to be tried, so should Wilhelm! Dieter had betrayed the Empire out of greed, but Wilhelm out of spite. If only he, Frederik, had been supported, he could have regained Marienburg.  But Wilhelm, envious of his success, had deliberately failed to come to his aid, and such conduct was unfit and unworthy of an Emperor.

1. Frederik of Talabecland accusing Wilhelm III

(http://i.imgur.com/usAUFXX.jpg)

This outburst was greeted with shocked silence. Then Wilhelm, pale but calm, answered. Frederik had disobeyed clear and direct orders, jeopardising the whole mission. In addition, he had not informed the command of his change of plans in a timely fashion. In any case, the main force would be unable to provide any real support. Siert had not fallen. Yes, they could have marched to Marienburg, with an enemy in their rear, but then what? With no siege equipment and no fleet, how could the pressure on the Empire forces in the Kasteel have been relieved? The worst thing of all: Frederik’s idea was quite ingenious and with proper preparation well worth pursuing, but Frederik’s rash actions just had served to alert Marienburg to this danger.

The calm answer and the obvious agreement of the Imperial Diet enraged Frederik even more. As the Grand Duke rushed forward, the Imperial Champion interpreted this as an attack, and Frederik’s life might have ended there, if others had not intervened and pulled him back. Furious and humiliated, Frederik immediately left the Court for Talabheim.

2. The intervention of the Imperial Champion

(http://i.imgur.com/EglquKS.jpg)

After a short recess, in which Frederik’s outburst was hotly debated, the Imperial Diet continued, but the trial of Dieter IV now proved something of an anticlimax. Unsurprisingly, the deposed Emperor was convicted in absentia of insubordination and non-compliance with the Imperial Summons, and his remaining fiefs and titles withdrawn.

To avoid a vacuum of authority in Stirland and improve his own power base, Wilhelm III immediately granted the County of Stirland to Ulrich Haupt-Anderssen, one of his staunchest supporters.

3. The investiture of Ulrich Haupt-Anderssen as Elector Count of Stirland

(http://i.imgur.com/E0tN9v9.jpg)


1. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 379 (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
2-3. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS 134, fol 73 and 16 (ca. 1500), Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (20/11)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 29, 2013, 08:30:22 PM
In order not to escalate the situation, Wilhelm III decided not to take measures against Frederik for his behaviour and declared the Imperial Diet closed.


1. Wilhelm III and the Electors leaving the Volkshalle after the Imperial Diet.
 
(http://i.imgur.com/3n0YiIX.jpg)

The Elector Counts had barely returned home, or the Grand Duke of Talabecland landed another bombshell. A month after the Imperial Diet, Talabec heralds appeared simultaneously in Altdorf and all the provincial capitals, declaring the disposition of Dieter IV illegal and thus null and void. Furthermore, they announced that Frederik had given the true Emperor shelter in Talabheim, and taken up his rightful cause against the usurper in Altdorf, against whom an Imperial ban was pronounced. To execute the ban and to restore order, Dieter IV had appointed Frederik as vicarius Imperii with plenipotentiary powers. As such, the Grand Duke called an Imperial Diet to take place in Talabheim within three weeks.

Frederik knew that he would not rally much support in this way. In Stirland, the the Krieglitz family, still powerful, opposed Ulrich Haupt-Andersen, but less in support of Dieter IV than their family’s claims to the Duchy. Elsewhere his message fell on deaf ears, even with those that had supported him in the election. But the main purpose of the declaration was to provide a juridical excuse for another daring action. Some days before the Talabec heralds came to Altdorf, a small Talabec force already infiltrated Altdorf. Together with the heralds, Frederik himself arrived in secret to take charge of the operation which would be launched in the early hours of the next morning. The aim:  to capture the three men which were the biggest obstacle to his plans: Wilhelm III, the Grand Theogonist, and Johann of Nuln, the Arch-Chancellor. 

2. The Talabec heralds at the court Wilhelm III in Altdorf .

(http://i.imgur.com/Uj4iaaz.jpg)

Note in the upper right hand corner the Frederik Untermensch and his small force about to infiltrate Altdorf.

The operation ended in total disaster.

The group sent to the Cathedral failed to detain the Grand Theogonist. Even worse: during the search of the Cathedral, they accidently set fire, which quickly spread. The Great Cathedral of Altdorf was set ablaze! 

3. The Grand Cathedral burning.

(http://i.imgur.com/62yni1m.jpg)

The illumination is not from The First Book of the Chronicle of Emperor Wilhelm III, but from the propagandist The Fall of the Stirland Dynasty. Note the men with torches. The artist seems to imply that the burning down of the Cathedral happened on purpose. In the foreground the attack on the Palace. The number of attackers is highly exaggerated.

The main Talabec force commanded by Frederik himself attacked the Palace and managed to force its way to the palace square.
 
4. The attack on the Palace in Altdorf.

(http://i.imgur.com/Ycn9mq2.jpg)


Just as Wilhelm III and success seemed within reach, Frederik was struck by lightning and fell lifeless to the ground! As his men saw their leader apparently dead, the attack collapsed. The Talabecers fled back to Talabheim, taking Frederik’s body with them. 

5. Frederik Untermensch struck down by lightning.

(http://i.imgur.com/V0lFf7n.jpg)

Note on the right hand side Wilhelm III. The artist has also depicted Frederik already brought back to Talabheim and being treated by doctors. Popular opinion (and Reikland propaganda) soon interpreted this event as divine punishment for the destruction of the Cathedral. However, the chronology is unclear, and the fire may have been set, after Frederik had been struck. More sceptic historians have rejected the story altogether as Reikland propaganda or a fanciful interpretation of what would have been no more than a heart attack. However, eyewitness accounts from both sides confirm the event.




1-2. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS 134, fol. 56 and 19 (ca. 1500), Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague.
3. Flavius Josèphe, Les Antiquités Judaiques,  fol. 213v. (ca. 1470) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
4-5. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 216r and 1v (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/11)
Post by: Commander Bernhardt on December 01, 2013, 12:51:21 PM
good stuff  :happy:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/11)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 08, 2013, 03:52:01 PM
Cinders of the blazing Cathedral had already set some neighbouring buildings alight. Therefore, Wilhelm III did not immediately pursue the fleeing enemy, sending only a scouting force to track their movements. Instead, he concentrated on extinguishing the fires, lest it spread to the palace and the entire city of Altdorf.  Once that was accomplished and the city was safe, he assembled his troops and set out for Talabheim. Marching along the Talabec river. He also instructed the Elector Counts to converge on Talabheim with all available forces. 

1. The Imperial Army on the march!

(http://i.imgur.com/Wz2i27k.jpg)

As they entered Talabecland, the Imperial forces did not meet any resistance. The insurrection of the Grand Duke had not been popular and the events at Altdorf were also in Talabecland seen as divine punishment. About midway, the Emperor was met by Talabec emissaries, offering unconditional surrender. All Talabec cities, including Talabheim, would open their gates to the Imperial forces. They also revealed that Grand Duke Frederik was still alive, but partially paralysed and incapable of speech, let alone of leading his army. As Wilhelm, wary of any new surprises, cautiously approached Talabheim, the gates opened and the Talabheim high nobility and City Counsel emerged to offer him the keys to the city. 

2. Wilhelm III meeting the Talabec emissaries.

(http://i.imgur.com/eWu9Zuu.jpg)

Note the Talabec river in the background. It is unclear which city is meant. Although the meeting took place midway (perhaps near Ravenstein), the artist may even be representing Talabheim, as the ultimate goal of the campaign.

3. The surrender of Talabheim

(http://i.imgur.com/nVbZ1EE.jpg)

The keys were offered near a shrine dedicated to Sigmar (in the middle), Taal and Rhya. In the distance the city of Talabheim, with big rocks indicating the crater.



1-3. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 69r, 57v and 294v (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (06/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 06, 2014, 03:22:01 PM
The Talabheim delegation asked the Emperor’s forgiveness and implored him to spare not just the city, but Grand Duke Frederik as well. But for his inspired defence of the city, Talabheim would have been destroyed in the Waaagh. Although they had not been involved in the revolt, just as Frederik stood by Talabheim in its darkest hour, Talabheim would stand by him in his darkest hour. They would share whatever punishment the Emperor would deem fit.
 
Wilhem III was highly impressed with the loyalty they displayed:  “The loyalty to your Duke and the loyalty to your Emperor must be one. If they were not, your Duke was to blame. I am not here to act revenge on the innocent or the misguided, but to ensure justice."

The Emperor ordered to arrest the arsenists of the Great Cathedral of Sigmar. Frederik Untermensch, who was slowly recovering, was kept under guard in the Ducal Palace, where Dieter IV was also found. It turned out that the deposed ruler had not been part of the insurrection. Serving only as pawn and pretext, he  had been kept under strict house arrest by Frederik, a measure that was now extended by Wilhelm III.

As the burning of the Great Cathedral had shocked the inhabitants of Talabheim, the arsenists were quickly rounded up, and in a summary judgement condemned to death by Wilhelm III.

(http://i.imgur.com/rsF3OU9.jpg)

1. The judgement of Wilhelm III and the execution of the arsenists of the Great Cathedral. In the background, Frederik Untermensch, still weak and leaning on the balcony of the Ducal palace, is watching the death of his men.

As all the Elector Counts had now arrived with their troops at Talabheim, Wilhem III decided to hold an Imperial Diet in the City to bring all problems surrounding the succession of Dieter IV to a conclusion.


1. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 287r (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (06/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 17, 2014, 08:35:05 PM
Evidently, if he did not want to undermine his own position, the insurrection could not go unpunished, but Wilhelm III did not want to antagonise another powerful family. The legality of the deposition of Dieter IV was somewhat debatable, and Wilhelm was therefore interested in finding a settlement, which would bolster his legitimacy. However, he had to tread a fine line between looking cruel and vindictive, or soft and spineless. As the executions had already shown that he was not afraid of swift justice, he could allow himself more leniency. He was helped by the fact that the Krieglitz family had not been involved in the insurrection of Frederik and that Talabecland had immediately surrendered to the imperial forces.

After four days of negotiations with the Elector Counts, the Krieglitz and the Untermensch families, the Emperor called the Imperial Diet in full session to hear his judgement on the insurgents. Frederik Untermensch had sufficiently recovered to be present, although he still had to be supported by his son.  As he entered, he was greeted first by a sudden silence, then a fluttering of excited whispers. A delegation of the Talabheim nobility and citizens accompanied him, anxious about the verdict but prepared to share his fate.


1. Frederik Untermensch arriving at the Imperial Diet

(http://i.imgur.com/zBYCJ8X.jpg)

Frederik Untermensch leaning on his son on his way past his gossiping fellow Electors. Behind him the Talabheim delegation.


1.Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS 134, fol. 192r (ca. 1500), Koninklijke Bibliotheek, The Hague.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
Post by: BAWTRM on January 20, 2014, 12:44:58 PM
This stuff is just so great, I love it!
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 20, 2014, 09:44:44 PM
Thank you! Will Frederik Untermensch have to pay the ultimate price for his ambition? What secrets are hidden in Tarnhelm's Keep? What is the difference between diplomatic and diplomatics? And are dark clouds gathering over Marienburg? Stay tuned!
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
Post by: Commander Bernhardt on January 22, 2014, 08:05:14 AM
Thank you! Will Frederik Untermensch have to pay the ultimate price for his ambition? What secrets are hidden in Tarnhelm's Keep? What is the difference between diplomatic and diplomatics? And are dark clouds gathering over Marienburg? Stay tuned!

ooh exciting!
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 24, 2014, 10:52:25 PM
Of course, all the decisions had already been taken beforehand,  and all the main characters involved knew what was about to happen. But as the session of the Imperial Diet constituted the ritualised closure of the conflict, Wilhelm III was intent on making the most of the opportunity to show both his authority and his clemency.

1. Wilhelm III at the Imperial Diet of Talabheim

(http://i.imgur.com/j7LhzVk.jpg)

At his side the Arch-Chancellor, Johann of Nuln, holding the indictment against Frederik Untermensch

While Frederik kneeled in submission (allegedly helped by a discrete clip in the knee from his son),  the Arch-Chancellor, Johann of Nuln, read out a long list of charges against the Grand-Duke of Talabecland, including treason, murder, arson, sedition, and sacrilege.

Wilhem III then announced his verdict:
Frederik Untermensch, your crimes are grave and many, crimes against the Empire, crimes against the Church, and,  indeed, crimes against Sigmar. According to the laws of gods and men, you have forfeited your goods, your lands, your life.

At this point, the Talabheim delegation, who was not privy to the negotiations, went decidedly pale.

But Sigmar himself, who struck you with his mighty hammer for your transgressions, nevertheless spared your life. And whom the god has spared, let no man put to cinder. In addition, the good people of Talabheim are prepared to share your fate, and we cannot allow innocents to be harmed, when loyalty takes the place of guilt. Your life is safe, therefore, but your title of Grand-Duke Elector of Talabecland and all the associated lands and benefits are withdrawn and return to the Imperial Crown.

We have never seen such loyalty as displayed by the City of Talabheim! But the loyalty to their Duke and the loyalty to their Emperor must be one. We fear, therefore, that another Duke will not have their loyalty and neither will the Empire. It is only for that reason and our high regard for the people of Talabheim, that we elevate the City of Talabheim to the status of Electoral Grand-Duchy. We, Wilhem III, Emperor of the Holy Empire of Sigmar, invest you, Frederik Untermensch, with the Electoral Grand-Duchy of Talabheim. You entered as Grand-Duke Elector of Talabecland. You kneeled as a convict, with titles, lands and life forfeited. Now accept from our hands your new life and fiefdom, and rise again as Grand-Duke Elector of Talabheim.


When they saw Frederik rising as the Grand-Duke of an independent Talabheim, the delegation of Talabheim started weeping out of relief and joy. Frederik, too, wept, but some say out of impotent rage and humiliation.  The leader of the Talabheim delegation addressed the Emperor: Your Imperial Majesty! Because of your might, we have opened our gates for you; because of your mercy, we now open our hearts for you. Long live his Imperial Majesty Wilhelm!

The whole room shook when the Imperial Diet’s took up the call  “Long live his Imperial Majesty Wilhelm!”

After repeated calls for silence finally had effect, the Imperial Diet proceeded with the investiture of Leopold Krieglitz, son of the deposed Dieter IV, as Grand-Duke of (the reduced) Talabecland.

2. The investiture of Leopold Krieglitz

(http://i.imgur.com/l0tulqK.jpg)

Note the new Grand-Duke of Talabheim standing next to the throne.



1-2. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 168v  & 281r (both modified; ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 26, 2014, 10:30:50 AM
These and other stipulations were subsequently formally issued in the Golden Bull of Talabheim, also known as the Reformatio Wilhelmi:



1. Wilhelm III signing the Golden Bull of Talabheim

(http://i.imgur.com/xD3DUKg.jpg)

With the Imperial Diet of Talabheim, the War of Succession ended in triumph for Wilhelm III, and his claim to the Imperial Throne was never challenged again.



For this success, he had only paid a relatively small price. The Untermensch family had insisted on an Electoral status, and the other Elector Counts had equally resisted the creation of a new Electoral vote. Therefore, Wilhelm III transferred the vote of Westerland, held by the Emperor, to the newly created Grand Duchy of Talabheim, with the proviso that the vote would return to the Emperor, if Talabheim and Talabecland were ever to be ruled in personal union – an act of foresight, as we have seen above.

In addition, Wilhelm had to concede to the Elector Counts the creation of the Rex Remanorum.b The RR, chosen by the Elector Counts, would be basically the heir apparent to the Emperor, and for his succession on the Emperor's death only the coronation by the Grand Theogonist was still needed. Wilhelm had at first been unwilling to accept what would amount to a watch-dog for the Electors and perhaps not so much an heir in waiting but a rival and threat to his reign. However, he finally agreed on condition that only the Emperor himself could propose a candidate. For more than 20 years, Wilhelm did not nominate a candidate, and whenever an Elector broached the subject, the Emperor would hint at the Elector's most despised rival as a possibility, at which point the issue was quickly dropped. As it turned out, the new function would in fact help to ensure the Imperial Throne for the Reikland Dynasty for generations to come.

In a separate and secret codicil, the Elector Counts agreed to new taxes to be used for the submission of Marienburg. The Emperor knew that the issue had been far from settled, but the campaign season was close to an end, and he also recognised that, in any case, without some sort of naval power, the Imperial Forces were unlikely to take the city without wholesale destruction -something he wanted to avoid. Until the next campaign season, he would make good use of the time and resources to thoroughly prepare the campaign.



The original copy of the Golden Bull with the signature and monogram of Wilhem III is still held in the Imperial Archives.

2. The Golden Bull of Talabheim

(http://i.imgur.com/5GpPDPK.jpg)

Sadly, the golden bulla (seal) itself was lost in unknown circumstances.



a. Given the odium as arsenists of the Great Cathedral that clung to the Untermensch name, the son of Frederik Untermensch changed the family name to Untern.
b. The title, claiming the heritage of the Reman Empire, was said to have been used by Sigmar, before taking the title of Emperor.



1. Life of Pompey, Cicero and Scipio Africanus, translated by Simon de Bourgouin. MS Fr.732, fol. 353v (ca. 1500) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
2. Golden Bull of Frederick III, issued 1465 September 4, in Neustadt. Hauptstaatsarchiv Stuttgart A 602 Nr 674 = WR 674
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/01/2014)
Post by: BAWTRM on January 28, 2014, 12:51:05 PM
Still massively enjoying this grand history of the empire. I love all those illustrations with their completely wrong kinds of dress, armour etc. for depicting their subject (in reality Roman characters).

I find the 'King of the Remans' bit rather peculiar. Is there indeed some bit of Empire lore that refers to this?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 28, 2014, 01:21:54 PM
Thank you! It was not necessarily that the knowledge for historical accuracy was lacking (although it often was), but rather that there was no demand for it. Until the Renaissance, people (both Christians and Muslims) were not interested in the Romans and Greeks per se, but as practical examples in all aspects of life. It was far easier to identify with them, if they were depicted in contemporary surroundings.

There is, indeed, no Warhammer Empire lore for the title "King of the Remans". It is taken from the historical Holy Roman Empire, where Rex Romanorum (King of the Romans) was the title of the elected king, before he was crowned emperor by the Pope. Several kings never made it emperor. In later times, it was also used (as here) for the heir apparent to the imperial crown. For instance, Friedrich III became King of the Romans in 1440, and Emperor in 1452 until his death in 1493. His son Maximilian was elected King of the Romans in 1486, and became Emperor in 1508. He was not actually crowned by the Pope, but with Papal assent took the title "Elected Roman Emperor." His successor, Charles V, would be the last emperor to be crowned by the Pope.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 29, 2014, 07:40:56 AM
Digression: the Imperial Signum (a diplomatic1 note)

Documents of the Imperial Chancellery express imperial authority through titles, seals, and bulls, but, as can be seen in the Golden Bull of Talabheim above, often also through monograms or signa. Indeed, the first and no doubt most famous signum is that Sigmar himself.2


(http://i.imgur.com/L9QNd8G.jpg)


In this  monogram,  the four consonants S G M R are attached to the ends of the cross-arms (representing the four wind directions), while the three vowels, I, A, and V (V=U in Reman), are joined in the central rhomb of the cross. Read clockwise, they form the name SIGMARVS. The monogram is accompanied by a signum line in Reman, which translates into “Sign of Sigmar, the most glorious Emperor.”

Although Sigmar could wield the pen as well as the hammer, the signum  was usually prepared by the Chancellery, and Sigmar himself only added the finishing touch (the so called Vollzugslinie).


In later times, the imperial signa become more and more elaborate. For example, the signum of Emperor Sigismund II (reigned 479 - 505)

(http://i.imgur.com/6IXpAZO.jpg)

is to be read SIGisMUNDus dEi gRATia imPeratOr semper augustus , or ”Sigismund, by the grace of god, Emperor, ever venerable."3 Note that the signum contains each letter only once, with AM and VN linked, while E is contained in G, and O in D.   
 
The accompanying signum line usually reads: Signum verum serenissimi principis Sigismundi divina favente clementia imperatoris invictissimi et gloriosissimi (True sign of the most serene prince Sigismund, by the favour of divine mercy, the most invincible and most glorious emperor.)


The signum of Wilhelm III (here taken from the Golden Bull of Talabheim)

(http://i.imgur.com/3rlhTeF.jpg)

constitutes both culmination and end of the Imperial signa, at least in documents. His successors will start to use their coat of arms instead, or even keep it limited to just their signature.

As with the signum of Sigmar, the basis is formed by a cross, as symbol of unity, with at the top a stylised twin comet.

(http://i.imgur.com/vHll9Fi.jpg)


This basis is then expanded to form the name Wilhelm III.

(http://i.imgur.com/NGfdVOV.jpg)


To the main frame, the letters DG AC ES IV are added as abbreviations of the imperial titels Imperator Dei Gratia Augustus Caesar Electus Sigmari Invictus (Emperor by the grace of god, Augustus Caesar, Chosen of Sigmar, the Invincible). 

(http://i.imgur.com/AQjnowV.jpg)


The monogram also contains the two principles of Wilhelm’s rule: PAX and LEX (Peace and Law). 

(http://i.imgur.com/JCe2lrG.jpg)

To keep the symmetry, lex is written from right to left.

Last but not least, we detect the famous but enigmatic vowel-combination  AEIOV, which can be found on most buildings, books and other objects related to Wilhem III.

(http://i.imgur.com/dQoi1vG.jpg)

In his diary, Wilhem III  writes:

Pei welhem pau oder auff welhem Silbergeschir oder kircngebant oder andern klainaten aeiov  der strich und die funff puestaben, stend, das ist mein, herczog Wilhelm des Jungern, gebessen oder ich hab das selbig paun oder machen lassen

(On whatever building or on whatever silver dishes or church clothes or other precious goods the line and the five letters AEIOV stand, that is the property of me, Duke Wilhelm the Younger, or I myself have had it build or made.)


To give just some examples:

4. Psalterium with hymns for Sigmar, dated 2477, Imperial Library, Altdorf.

(http://i.imgur.com/0hJi7xL.jpg)


5. The "Giant’s Bone" found during the reconstruction of the Great Cathedral in Altdorf; Imperial Museum, Altdorf.

(http://i.imgur.com/qiPymUY.jpg)

Wilhelm himself does not seem to have ever explained the meaning, but next to the letters in the diary another hand has added, in both the classical “Altdorf est imperare orbi universo”, and the vernacular “Aller Erd’ Imperium oblieget uns” (Altdorf/we are to rule the whole world),  which has become the most widely accepted interpretation.

Epigraphic analysis shows that the entry, although not by Wilhem himself, was made during his lifetime. Indeed, other contemporary sources give the same interpretation. However, as this part of the diary was written at a time when Altdorf was not the imperial capital, and Wilhelm had just become Grand-Duke of Reikland, with no prospect of becoming Emperor, this explanation seems unlikely to be the original one. 

Later in the same diary, the following elegiac couplet in the classical language can be found:

En, amor ellectis [sic], iniustis ordinor ultor;
Sic Wilhelmus ego rengna
[sic] mea rego.

(Look, I was appointed as love for the chosen and avenger against the unjust.
Thus, I ,Wilhelm, rule over my realms.)

   
As our readers will have already discerned, the couplet contains both spelling and metrical errors – Wilhelm’s grasp of the classical language seems to have been somewhat wanting.
 
A recently found fragment of a Chronicle6 written around 2460 seems to have the correct version:

Der kayser het auch in derselben zeit nach seinem willen an der purkh ze Altdorff aines tails pawen und sein liberey, die funff  vocalpüchstaben, an manigen steten der purkh kostlich machen lassen. Da het ainer dem kayser ze smach uber dieselben püchstaben geschriben: Altdorffs Ehr is offenbahr verdorben.' Dem kayser das missuielle und liess die abhin. Welcherlay auslegung der kayser auf denselben puchstaben het, ist in disen zwain classischen versen begriffen, die dises püches zesambseczer an ainer kostlichen almar desselben kaysers gesehen hat:

En! Amor Electis, Iniustis Ordinor Ultor.
Sic Wilhelmus ego rex mea iura rego.


Das ist teutsch sovil geredt: Sehet, ich pin geordnet lieb den erwellten, und recher den ungerechten; also regier ich, kunig Wilhelm, meine recht.

(At the same time, the emperor had part of the castle in Altdorf and his library built according to his wishes,  and had the five vowels at various places of the castle richly adorned. To the shame of the emperor, someone had written over those letters: “Altdorf’s honour is obviously tainted”. The emperor was dismayed and had it removed.  What interpretation the Emperor had of the same letters, is comprised in these two classical verses, which the compiler of this book has seen on a precious book cabinet of the same emperor:

En! Amor Electis, Iniustis Ordinor Ultor.
Sic Wilhelmus ego rex mea iura rego.

That is in Teutsch as much as: Look, I was appointed as love for the chosen and avenger against the unjust., thus, I , king Wilhelm, rule over my rights.)
   


But again, the plural “regna mea” (or mea iura in the version of the Chronicle) indicates that this too was probably written only after his election to Emperor.   Note also the very first occurrence of the many parodies of the device.

There are also two precious chalices belonging to Wilhelm III (one dated to 2451) that bear above the vowel-combination the words: “Aquila Ejus Iuste Omnia Vincet” (His Eagle will justly vanquish all).

Whether we will ever know the original meaning remains doubtful. Some scholars have invested great time and effort to come to a definitive solution, producing vast volumes with arguments pro and contra certain interpretations, but I fear “Am End Ist Olles Umsonst” (in the end, everything is in vain). 



1. Diplomatic (British English) or diplomatics (American English): the study of documents.
2. Own invention based on the signum of Charlemagne.

3. Signum of Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund of Luxemburg (1368-1437)
4. Cod. 3079, fol 1r, (original date 1477 modified) Österreichische Nationalbibliothek , Wien
5. Femur of a mammoth, found in 1443, when the foundations were laid for the gothic north tower of the Stephansdom in Vienna; Geologisches Archiv, Wien.
6. Modified text from Lhotsky, A., Eine unbeachtete Chronik Österreichs aus der Zeit Kaiser Friedrichs III., in: Festschrift zur Feier des zweihundertjähr. Bestandes des Haus-, Hof- u. Staatsarchivs, hrsg. v. Leo San tifa 11 e r, 1. Bd. (Mitteilungen d. Österr. Staatsarchivs, Erg. Bd. 2), Wien 1949, S. 538-548
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 30, 2014, 12:49:37 PM
Post merged.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
Post by: S.O.F on January 30, 2014, 06:31:42 PM
Lovely stuff again sir. A question though, isn't it easier and more lore friendly to refer to Reman as Classical? In most the Warhammer stuff I've gone through I think latin in the Warhammer world is more commonly referred to as such, a product of the Verenian Cult's influence in legal matters. Reman always feels like more the living speech of those who live in Remas, which now would be a dialect of Tilean where Classical has the proper dead ancient language feel. Just a thought.

Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
Post by: Mathi Alfblut on January 30, 2014, 08:17:22 PM
Lovely stuff.
I would agree with S.O.F that it would be better to refer to Reman as classical. After all, Remas is a contemporary political entity but it is just a shadow of the Reman Empire.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
Post by: Darknight on January 30, 2014, 08:25:30 PM
I particularly like that signum; did you invent that yourself? Regardless, I am tempted to steal it.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 30, 2014, 08:44:23 PM
@ SOF: Good point. I had not even looked it up - I just had the Reman legions of Marcus Octavius in mind, without thinking that something else might be in use. Or that, as Mathi points out, Remas is still an existing entity.

On a side note: there is in fact a way  to “flip-flop” the Westerland/Nordland Electoral vote as you propose. Princes could always invoke “Hausrecht” over custom, i.e. houserule their inheritance. In most cases, that only caused family infighting, and was reversed one way or the other, but let us assume that the ancestor in question enjoyed unlimited respect over the generations. So, it is quite possible that according to Hausrecht, the title would shift between family branches. However, the title itself would not change.

To make this work we have to assume further:
- Westerland and Nordland were in fact always part of the same Electorate. Let us suppose here that Nordland is part of Westerland. 
- The wording of the sources is sloppy (what do you expect – it is GW!): when they talk about an Elector of Nordland, they mean in fact the Elector of Westerland, but of the Nordland branch of the family.
- Given the relatively frequent changes, we have to assume that the shift occurs, if there is no male heir in one branch to take the title at the time it becomes available (but the line itself does not have to be extinct in a direct line). 
- This system stops with the death of the last Westerland Elector. As Magnus did not honour the Hausrecht, both branches must have become extinct in the direct line.



@ Darknight: As it says in the footnote: my own design, but based on the signum of Charlemagne.

(http://i.imgur.com/a0QSxrp.png)
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
Post by: S.O.F on January 30, 2014, 09:35:35 PM
On a side note: there is in fact a way  to “flip-flop” the Westerland/Nordland Electoral vote as you propose. Princes could always invoke “Hausrecht” over custom, i.e. houserule their inheritance. In most cases, that only caused family infighting, and was reversed one way or the other, but let assume that the ancestor in question enjoyed unlimited respect over the generations. So, it is quite possible that according to Hausrecht, the title would shift between family branches. However, the title itself would not change.

To make this work we have to assume further:
- Westerland and Nordland were in fact always part of the same Electorate. Let us suppose here that Nordland is part of Westerland. 
- The wording of the sources is sloppy (what do you expect – it is GW!): when they talk about an Elector of Nordland, they mean in fact the Elector of Westerland, but the of the Nordland branch of the family.
- Given the relatively frequent changes, we have to assume that the shift occurs, if there is no male heir in one branch to take the title at the time it becomes available (the line itself does not have to be extinct in a direct line). 
- This system stops with the death of the last Westerland Elector. As Magnus did not honour the Hausrecht, both branches must have become extinct in the direct line.


Seems a rather elegant solution to the problem. When the Elector of Nordland is written we can perhaps consider the sources are not particularly scholarly but taken from old annals. So when some scribe is noting the events of some time in say the 1500's he simply notes Elector of Nordland as he is unlikely aware the Electorship actually derives from Westerland. Where if say we had a faux primary source Volkshalle role of a similar year the Elector in question would be listed with full and proper titles. I mean when comes to how the fluff is written I often times try and attach context of source to it. WHFRP works I tend to think of more as neutral/scholarly works while the army books tend to be hastily thrown together propaganda pieces at the behest of the Cult of Sigmar.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/01/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 31, 2014, 11:49:24 PM
Post merged.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (01/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 05, 2014, 10:14:05 AM
Post merged
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (05/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 08, 2014, 01:07:07 PM
The War of Succession: epilogue.

In the months to come, Frederik Untermensch made an almost complete recovery, although his left arm remained paralysed and his speech continued to suffer from a slight slur. He never opposed Wilhelm III again, but it is also said that he never overcame his resentment towards the Emperor.

In his memoirs, Siegfried von Trautenau, major-domo of Grand Duke Frederick, recounts: In the wake of these unfortunate events [i.e. the War of Succession], the Grand Duke had become prone to recurring periods of deepest melancholy. As a remedy, he commissioned an exquisite triptych for his privy chambers. In his brooding moments, the Grand Duke would lock himself in his chambers, sitting in meditation before the painting, sometimes for hours, until his spirits had been sufficiently lifted. At all other times, the triptych remained closed and locked, and he never allowed anyone else to see the inside, leading to baseless gossip among the servants that it must contain some vile work of pornography and perversion. 

Based on the notes and receipts in the Grand Ducal archive, the scholar Jan Bienenstock was very recently able to identify the triptych in question as the Saga of Crispin and Crispinian. According to the documents, the painting by the hand of the Westerland painter Harnoult van den Boske (or Aert van den Bossche) was commissioned by Frederik in the summer of 2430. Shortly after completion, the painter disappeared in unresolved circumstances, but, as Bienenstock discovered, the triptych has survived, and is now in possession of the Talabheim Museum of Fine Arts.

The subject of the painting, the Saga of Crispin and Crispinian, is a tale of valour and self-sacrifice from the Age of Wars. In 1577, a Middenheim army invaded Talabecland, seized the city of Talagaad and started a 20 year long siege of the city of Talabheim. During the first winter, Middenheim soldiers managed to capture two captains of the Taalbaston Guard, the twins Crispin and Crispinianus. Despite being subjected to various forms of torture, the brothers stubbornly refused to betray their city and reveal any details about the Talabheim defences; they were finally put to the sword, sacrificing their lives for their city.

1. The Saga of Crispin and Crispinian – central panel

(http://i.imgur.com/nTHlCIA.jpg)

The story in the central panel of the triptych unfolds from left to right, alternating between fore- and background. In the left-hand background, we can see a somewhat fanciful depiction of the city of Talagaad, which served as the headquarters of the Middenheim army during the siege.
The brothers have been escorted out of the city, and are first “softened up” with a club, before their toenails are extracted. Tied to the central tree, dividing the picture in two halves, the twins, with sharp irons driven between the toe- and fingernails, are flayed alive. On either side, almost as a kind of evil pendant to the twin heroes, the Middenheim general with his entourage is represented, once on foot, once on horseback, but always watching in malicious glee. On the right hand side, the torture continues in the rocky landscape near the crater of Talabheim, where the brothers are pushed from a cliff into the frozen waters of the Taal and then boiled alive in a bronze cauldron. 

The Saga of Crispin and Crispinian – central panel (detail)

(http://i.imgur.com/UCSvCE4.jpg)

At the bottom, the hands with spiked nails are visible. To the right, you can discern one of the twins trying to crawl away after his fall from the cliff. On the frozen waters of the Taal, a game of Kolf is played.

2. The Saga of Crispin and Crispinian – wings

(http://i.imgur.com/Ws1IL2s.jpg)

The last scene of the central panel is repeated in greater detail on the left wing, but set in different surroundings:  in front of a building that notably resembles Tarnhelm’s Keep in Talabheim. An angel of Shallya comforts the suffering twins. The right wing depicts the final act: the decapitation, and, in the background, a hasty, unceremonial burial, a last insult to these brave captains of the Taalbaston Guard.


The subject of the Saga can hardly be said to be  “a vile work of pornography and perversion” . Indeed, it seems quite appropriate for the halls of the Grand Duke of Talabheim, but it does seem rather unusual and morbid as a remedy for a melancholic disposition. Closer inspection leads us to suspect that there is something amiss under the surface.

Firstly, the twins bear an uncanny resemblance to Wilhelm III. Aert van den Bossche, of course, also painted  the Coronation of Wilhem III (v. supra, post 12), just before he accepted the commission of Frederik Untermensch. Perhaps no coincidence on Frederiks part? Anyway, if we overlay the face of Crispin (or Crispinianus?) from the left wing triptych on the (reversed) face of Wilhelm III from the Coronation and adjust for the different position of the head, it turns out to be an almost perfect match.

(http://i.imgur.com/RNi6ygD.jpg)

Furthermore, the general of Middenheim looks remarkably like a younger Frederik Untermensch. Just vanity? Or an expression of the thought “If only I had been younger, things might have ended differently”? In the painting at least, Wilhelm III is completely at his whim and mercy.

One may, therefore, conclude at least with some degree of probability that the triptych does indeed represent Frederik’s  fantasies of vengeance towards his victor. The objection can be raised that Wilhelm is playing the hero part in the saga, and Frederik the villain. However, this is likely to be a safety device, as the painting could easily be interpreted as an indication of sedition and lese-majesty – which in fact it is. Presumably, this is the reason why Frederik never allowed anyone else to see the triptych in the first place.  And perhaps also the reason why it is the last known painting of the artist...


But were they just spiteful fantasies? The discovery of the triptych lends credence to a more sinister tale. Shortly after being installed as Grand Duke of Talabheim, Frederik Untermensch turned Tarnhelm’s Keep (depicted in the triptych!) into a prison. Some believe that this was to placate the reformist Cult of Shallya, but, from the start, there were persistent rumours about secret torture chambers, hidden deep within the very bowels of the dungeon.  Here, selected prisoners would enjoy special treatment at the hands of Frederik himself - prisoners selected because of their resemblance to Wilhelm III!

This could  may also explain the tales of horror about “the Beast” stalking Tarnhelm’s Keep at night and killing prisoners in a most bloody and gruesome fashion.  Perhaps the Beast was not a beast, but an Untermensch.

Without doubt all very fascinating speculation, but, ultimately, just that: speculation. The one who really knows, Frederik Untermensch, Grand Duke of Talabheim, died in 2443.




1. The Martyrdom of Saints Crispin and Crispinian (central triptych) by Aert van den Bossche (1494), National Museum Warsaw.
2. Martyrdom of Saints Crispin and Crispinian, (right wing triptych) by Aert van den Bossche (1494), Museum van de Stad Brussel, K/1977/1&2.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 10, 2014, 10:11:51 PM
I have re-arranged the posts a bit, merging the several parts of the digression on the Imperial Signum and placing them after the Golden Bull of Talabheim (post 47). The next digression "The History of Talabecland as Depicted in its Heraldry" connects better with the epilogue. 
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/02/2014)
Post by: Commander Bernhardt on February 21, 2014, 10:52:21 AM
wonderfull! What's next down the line?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 22, 2014, 09:19:42 AM
Springtime and the campaigning season are approaching. Will Wilhelm want to wage war with the wicked Warienburgers? But there is the digression into heraldry first. 
Title: Re: The History of Talabecland as reflected in its heraldry
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 23, 2014, 10:26:17 AM
Digression: The History of Talabecland as reflected in its heraldry

The hereditary heraldic system as it developed since the 12th century allows much more than just identifying the bearer of a coat of arms. Heraldic changes reflect dynastic and political changes, but heraldry can also be used to express ideological ideas or political statements.

Bertold I Untermensch (fl. 1200) seems to have been the first Untermensch (and the first Duke of Talabecland) to adopt a family coat of arms.  In all probability, this happened when he was invested with the Grand Duchy of Talabecland, and the choice of an eagle reflects a close link with the Empire. No depictions other than his seals have survived, and while these do not indicate the colours (tinctures), contemporary sources describe the coat of arms as a red eagle on gold (in heraldic terms: Or, an eagle displayed Gules).

1. Seal of Bertold I Untermensch


(http://i.imgur.com/CvqKBzJ.jpg)(http://i.imgur.com/fixrtwd.jpg)


In time, different family branches distinguished themselves by displaying the eagle armed (i.e. with a different tincture for beak and claws). The achievement (whole emblazonment) below of Berthold V from around 1300 also shows the helmet, Grand Ducal coronet and family crest, together with the coat of arms of the major Untermensch vassals.

2.

(http://i.imgur.com/XfZraF9.jpg)

Or, an eagle displayed Gules armed Azure. Upon a helmet mantled Gules doubled Vert this crest: Issuant from a Grand Ducal coronet Or, a pair of Capricorn horns, dexter Or, sinister Gules.


1. The coat of arms of Bertold I von Zähringen, Margrave of Verona (ca. 1040-1074) is taken from Graf G. (2011), Die heraldische Entwicklung der Wappen des Hauses Baden, p.1. The seal displayed belongs to Bertold V von Zähringen and is taken from Heyk E. (1980 reprint from 1891/2), Die Geschichte der Herzöge von Zähringen, Scientia Verlag Aalen, Table IV.
2. Coat of Arms of the Margrave of Baden (modified) from the Armorial de Bellenville, Français 5230, fol. 63v, (XV century) Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (23/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2014, 10:11:54 AM
In 1360, when Ottilia I proclaimed herself empress, the helmet and Grand Ducal coronet were replaced by an imperial crown, which was also included in the banners of the Ottilian Empire, to symbolise the claim to the imperial throne. 

1. Ottilia I                               

(http://i.imgur.com/YWQo2xv.jpg)

Ottilia I, with the elected Emperor Otto VI underfoot. Talabheim, Grand Ducal Palace.
The sword and book symbolise the firmness and wisdom of her rule, or, alternatively, her zeal in spreading the Ulrician faith by force and persuasion. The painting by an unknown artist, was commissioned by Grand Duke Frederik Untermensch in 2401, the year Dieter IV was elected Emperor. Some scholars interpret the painting as an early indication of Fredrik’s ambitions on the imperial throne.


2. The Ottilian Imperial Coat of Arms and Imperial Banner.

(http://i.imgur.com/4cUFrrF.jpg)   (http://i.imgur.com/MLLiQAq.jpg)

The depiction of the Ottilian imperial coat of arms is the first page of a XXII century copy of "Das Ottilische Waffenbuch". The text reads: hiernach folgen die namen und wapen des grosmechtigen loblichen reichs darum ottilia das recht oberst haupt ist (hereafter follow the names and coat of arms of the powerfull and laudible empire of which Ottilia is the rightful supreme head.


1. Saint Catherine of Alexandria (probably the left wing of a triptych), Master of the Legend of Saint Lucy (c. 1470 - c. 1500), Philadephia Museum of Art, Philadephia.
2.  The (modified) coat of arms is taken from, Sammelband mehrerer Wappenbücher (1530) - BSB Cod.icon. 391, fol 63r, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München. The banner is taken from Das Ortenburger Wappenbuch (1466-1473) BSB Cod.icon. 308 u, fol. 22r, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München.
 
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/02/2014)
Post by: Darknight on February 25, 2014, 06:31:11 PM
This is really excellent work, Fidelis - I wonder; would you be able to assemble this together (when it is all done) into a PDF format document for reading / printing? I realize a commercial use would be fruitless (owing to using Warhammer references, as well as these images) but for private use I daresay it would be fine.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2014, 08:32:43 PM
Thank you. It is certainly worth a thought. Although it would need to be piecemeal (per reign perhaps): in 5 months, I have not even covered a full year. Since the idea is to cover the period of 2429 to about 2515, at this rate, it will take me about 40 years.  :ph34r:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 26, 2014, 05:30:34 PM
Digression: The History of Talabecland as reflected in its heraldry - continued.

In all probability, Bertold I Untermensch chose the eagle, because he received Talabecland as an imperial fief. As the Ottilian (Anti-)Empire lasted almost a millenium (1360-2304), it was ironic, but inevitable that the Untermensch coat of arms would become the symbol of the Anti-Empire, and the red Eagle an Anti-Eagle to the Imperial black Eagle. When the Empire was reunited under Magnus, Grand Duke Hermann II of Talabecland was therefore “persuaded” to choose a new coat of arms, retaining, however, the family colours. 

(http://i.imgur.com/bJUMngL.jpg)

1. Or, a bend Gules. Upon a helmet mantled Or doubled Gules this crest: Issuant from a Grand Ducal coronet Or, a pair of Capricorn horns, Argent.


When, shortly afterwards, Talabecland was reunited with Talabheim (independent since 1750), the Talabheim colours (red and white = Gules and Argent) were incorporated into the new Untermensch coat of arms, to reflect the re-unification.

(http://i.imgur.com/1TIT7TW.jpg)

2. Quartered, 1 and 3: Or, a bend Gules; 3 and 4: checky, Argent and Gules. Upon a helmet mantled Or doubled Gules this crest: Issuant from a Grand Ducal coronet Or, a pair of peacock feathers, between a pair of Capricorn horns, dexter Or, sinister Gules.
 
3. Grand Duke Frederik Untermensch with his coat of arms.

(http://i.imgur.com/IpHZt8J.jpg)

The old “Ottilian” coat of arms was never forbidden by law, and other noble families or Talabec cities were not required to change their coat of arms, if it happened to contain the "Ottilian eagle." Nevertheless, it remained suspect as a symbol of Ottilian separatism. During the short interlude of his reign, Helmut Feuerbach, whose rise and fall is still shrouded in mystery, re-introduced the red eagle. Without a real powerbase in Talabecland, he may have been appealing to Talabec nationalism to garner support. However, that must have raised some eyebrows at the Imperial Court, and various scholars have argued that the suspicions this ill-advised choice inspired contributed to the shortness of his reign.


1. CoA of the Margraves of Baden. This coat of arms was adopted by Hermann II, grandson of Bertold I von Zähringen, and first Margrave of Baden (ca. 1074-1134). Scheibler’sches Wappenbuch (1450-1600), BSB Cod.icon. 312 c fol. 16 Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München.
2. CoA adopted by Jakob I, Margrave of Baden (1407-1453). Scheibler’sches Wappenbuch (1450-1600), BSB Cod.icon. 312 c fol. 12, 16 Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München
3. Detail from the Markgrafentafel by Hans Baldung Grien (around 1511). Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe. The full picture can be found here: http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/index.php?topic=47520.msg857681#msg857681
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (27/02/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 24, 2014, 04:24:37 PM
Of course, the Golden Bull of Talabheim “heralded” a major change in Talabecland, and the new Krieglitz dynasty  introduced its own coat of arms.

Dieter IV, as emperor, had preferred the coat of arms of the house of Unfähiger, as shown here in this beautiful stained glass window from the Cathedral in Nuln, which miraculously survived the Waaagh and Dieter’s downfall. 

1. Coat of Arms of Dieter IV from Nuln Cathedral

(http://i.imgur.com/txWL48L.jpg)

Quartered, 1 & 4: Azure three fleurs-de-lis Or ; 2 & 3: Gules three lions passant gardant in pale Or armed and langued, the whole surrounded by a Garter; for a Crest the Imperial crown Or and Gules; for Supporters, dexter a lion rampant gardant Or, sinister a dragon Gules, Motto 'Dieu et mon Droit' (God and My Right) below the shield.
Note the Blue Garter, as symbol of the Order of the Knights Panther. When Dieter IV was made an honorary knight of the Order, he was so proud that he included the garter into his achievement. When he had become fat, it was joked that it was not a garter, but a belt as symbol of his gluttony.



Initially, the supporters of the coat of arms consisted of Dieter’s favourite animals: a dragon and his pet, Greyhound called Ball. When the latter died, Dieter was so distraught, that he replaced the Greyhound in his coat of arms with a lion.

2. Coat of Arms of Dieter IV from Julbach Manor.

(http://i.imgur.com/xAAXyEJ.jpg)

The inscription reads: Dieter Imperator Augustus Quartus incl(itus) armis magnanimus struxit hoc opus egregium (The August Emperor Dieter IV renowned in war, magnanimous, constructed this egregious building.


As we have seen, Dieter had tried for a long time to acquire a real dragon for the Imperial Menagerie, and when he finally succeeded in 2429, as part of the price for the secession of  Marienburg, it contributed to his disposition. Because of his unpopularity, his coat of arms was sometimes destroyed in public places after his fall by the populace, although sources close to the Krieglitz attribute this to Wilhelm III. 

3. Destroyed Coat of Arms of Dieter IV from Nuln

(http://i.imgur.com/XMH6ei0.jpg)


1. Royal Arms of Henry VIII in his later reign, Hampton Court.
2. Royal Arms of Henry VIII in his earlier reign, Borehamwood Essex. The original text reads: "Henricus Rex Octavus, Rex inclit. armis magnanimus struxit hoc opus egregium,"  or "King Henry VIII, the magnanimous king renowned in arms, constructed this egregious building."
3. Royal Arms of Henry VIII, East Barsham Manor
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (24/03/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 26, 2014, 05:02:27 PM
Perhaps Dieter IV thought the Krieglitz coat of arms too  “fishy”: when the Krieglitz branch of the Unfähiger had been invested with the Grand County of Stirland, it had adopted the Stirland Lurkerfish instead of the Unfähiger Lions. As the new Elector Count of Talabecland, Leopold Krieglitz returned to the Krieglitz coat of arms.

1. Coat of Arms of the Krieglitz family

(http://i.imgur.com/DUxqsam.jpg)

Quartered 1 & 4 : Azure, semé-de-lys Or, a bordure Gules; 2 & 3 Azure, semy of crosslets Or and two barbels addorsed, haurient and embowed Or.

As we have seen, the Krieglitz intermarried with the Untermensch, and the Krieglitz-Untern dynasty that eventually came to rule a re-united Talabecland merged the coat of arms of the two families. 

2. Coat of Arms of the Krieglitz-Untern family

(http://i.imgur.com/Q3oF3yg.jpg)

Quartered, 1 & 4, Azure, semé-de-lys Or, a bordure Gules; 2 & 3 Azure, semy of crosslets Or and two barbels addorsed, haurient and embowed Or. Overall Or, a bend Gules.




1 & 2. Coat of Arms of Anjou-Bar and of Anjou-Bar-Lorraine (modified: the three alerions argent of Lorraine have been deleted), as adopted by René d'Anjou (1409-1480).
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (27/03/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 29, 2014, 02:48:06 PM
As as closing paragraph for this heraldic note, it seems fitting to spend a few words on the successors to the Krieglitz as Elector Counts of Stirland, the Haupt-Anderssens.

The original coat of arms of the Haupt-Anderssen, Viscounts of Wurtberg (later renamed Wurtbad), consisted of three black stag's antlers on a field of gold, perhaps indicating their attachment to Taal. Ulrich IIIa seems to have introduced in 2227 as crest the red hunting horn, which would become one of the main symbols of the Haupt-Anderssen and later Stirland.

Ulrich V Haupt-Anderssen was the younger son of Count Eberhard IV and Henriette of Mömpelgard. He was called "der Vielgeliebte" (the much loved one), either because of his benevolent disposition towards the common folk , or because he was married three times and had numerous illegitimate children. 

1. Ulrich V and his wives.

(http://i.imgur.com/8KSN7lf.jpg)

Or, three stag's antlers of 4 branches, Sable. The paintings are part of a now lost triptychon. Wurtbad, Electoral Palace.


His adoption of a new coat of arms reflects not only his investiture as Elector Count in 2429, but probably also the Krieglitz opposition: by choosing the Stirland Lurker fish from the Krieglitz coat of arms (but in a different colour), he symbolically depicted the replacement of  the Krieglitz as Elector Count of Stirland.   


2. Coat of arms of Ulrich V, after his investiture as Elector Count of Stirland, with the subordinate fiefdoms.

(http://i.imgur.com/Pme1XEP.jpg)

Quartered 1 & 4, Or three stag's antlers of 4 branches, Sable; 2 & 3, Gules two barbels addorsed, haurient, palewise , and embowed Or, Upon a helmet Or mantled Sable semé of vine leaves Or this crest: a red hunting horn stringed Or, enguiché Or, and from the mouthpiece issuant three plumes: Gules, Argent, and Azure.


a. For some reason, the name of Ulrich was very popular wih the Haupt-Anderssens, in spite of their attachment to Taal. This has led to some scholarly speculations, including the emendation of the name to Erich. However, all of these speculations are higly doubtful.



1. Ulrich V of Württemberg and his three wives, by an anonymous painter (1470-1480), Landesmuseum Württemberg, Stuttgart.
2. Coat of Arms of the Counts of Württenberg. Wappenbuch des St. Galler Abtes Ulrich Rösch (1463-1491), Cod. Sang. 1084, p. 209, Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen. 
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/03/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 02, 2014, 04:30:36 PM
Post merged.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (02/04/2014)
Post by: Commander Bernhardt on April 02, 2014, 09:19:13 PM
it's great that you keep on dooing this! It must be a lot of work to find the right images?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (02/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 03, 2014, 08:04:41 AM
Thank you. Yes, it requires quite some work, in particular as I want to stick (more or less) to the chronology:
Wilhelm III = Friedrich III (1440-1493)
Matthias/Luitpold = Maximilian I/Filips the Fair (1496-1519)
Karl Franz = Charles V (1519-1556)

I allowed myself one major anachronism: Henry VIII as Dieter IV, because he is just too perfectly cast for the role. Of course, that and other decisions have continuing and sometimes unexpected consequences. I am always grateful, if anyone can point out errors or inconsistencies. 

Another problem (touched upon in another thread) is that the Empire does not really change much since Magnus, while the historical parallel period saw major changes in all fields. That does add further limitations, as I do not want the depictions to look too outdated. Of course, by the time of Karl Franz, that difficulty will have all but disappeared.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (02/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 04, 2014, 12:46:19 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg

With the advent of spring,a the problem of Marienburg, like a bird of passage, returned to the Imperial Court. Wilhelm III had been using the winter months to prepare the campaign to return Marienburg to the Empire. Because of the necessary secrecy, preparations did not proceed as fast as he had hoped, but he was faced with increasing impatience from the Elector Counts.

1. Wilhelm III at the Imperial Council

(https://i.imgur.com/A4bERAG.jpg)

At a meeting of the Imperial Council, Wilhelm III discussed the various options with his closest advisors. To capture the city, there were three basic options: storm, siege or subterfuge.

Unfortunately, the Emperor would have to fight with one hand tied to his back, as he did not want to kill the goose that laid the golden egg. That goose was not the city as such (houses and harbours can always be rebuild), but its people, their skills, knowledge, and the foreign trade networks they had build. Storming the city would in all likelihood end in massive slaughter of the population, which Wilhelm wanted to avoid at all cost. Besieging the city was, at least in that respect, a far better option: the Emperor was confident that the Marienburg merchants, known for their gourmet tastes,  would prefer submission before starvation, in particular when given favourable terms.

The river Reik and the Great Northern Road provided excellent advance and supply routes. However, this was more than offset by the geophysical conditions around Marienburg, which was protected no less by the surrounding marshes and wetlands than by its massive walls (the Vloedmuur).  The immediate vicinity of the city had been turned into polders, but this did little to improve the situation for a siege or assault.  Movement, hampered by the numerous drainage canals, was channelled through small dykes and bridges, which could be breached or destroyed. The polder soil itself remained soggy, and unsuited for heavy cavalry or artillery. The terrain also favoured guerrilla actions, which could threaten the rear area and supply lines. Although they could not care less about politics, the Fenn Loonies in particular could well pose such a threat, either in the pay of Marienburg, or out of sheer malice.

2. Marienburg and the Wasteland

(https://i.imgur.com/NKxolkJ.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/p5nkhEV.jpg)

Detail from the earliest existing map of Marienburg and its surroundings, early 26th century. Like many maps of the time, the Marienburg map is oriented to the east (as indicated by the compass card on the lower left). A modern map is added for comparison; the rectangle indicates the area covered by the Marienburg map.


The main snag: the lack of an Imperial Fleet in the Sea of Claws. If Marienburg could not be cut off from the sea, any siege would be futile. The few warships that had survived the naval battle against Grom the paunch and the ensuing storm had been confiscated by Marienburg, when the city declared its independence. 

Although Wilhelm III had some ideas to overcome these problems, his preferred option was some kind of subterfuge, but the rash action of Frederik Untermensch had alerted Marienburg to that danger. 

Following a suggestion of Johann of Nuln, it was therefore decided to send an embassy to Marienburg for a last attempt at a diplomatic solution. This embassy was a sincere attempt by Wilhelm III to achieve an equitable solution, and he was willing to go quite far to ensure Marienburg’s re-entry into the Empire. Obviously, the money given to Dieter IV needed to be repaid. Tax exemptions (both temporary and permanent) would be granted. The autonomy Marienburg had previously enjoyed would be enhanced.

3. The Imperial envoys arriving at Marienburg

(https://i.imgur.com/VAp9tab.jpg?2)


However, the reception in Marienburg was quite arrogant, impertinent even. The envoys had to wait for the next weekly meeting of the Directorate, as the Directorate “could not schedule an extra council for minor matters”, and when they finally were granted an audience by the Directorate, the representatives of the Emperor first had to kneel in reverence!  Although the Directorate seemed happy to drag out negotiations, it became soon clear to the envoys that no incentive could ever persuade the Directorate to seriously contemplate a return to the Empire.


4. The Imperial envoys before the Marienburg Directorate.

(https://i.imgur.com/tB5qAHZ.jpg)

At this point, the envoys embarked on the second, secret task given by Wilhelm III, in case negotiations were futile: to initiate the first stage (subterfuge) of the military campaign against Marienburg.


a. According to WFRP sources, Wilhelm send three expeditions against Marienburg in 2429. However, it is highly unlikely that the deposition of Dieter IV, the election of Wilhelm III, the War of Succession, and three campaigns against Marienburg could have taken place in the short timeframe of a single year.



1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik, p. 417 (1484/85) Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
2. Luzernerkarte (modified) by Hans Heinrich Wägmann and Renward Cysat (1597-1613), Signatur ZHB Kart. IX/13Universitätsbibliothek Bern.
3. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 61 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
4. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 836 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern

Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (04/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 10, 2014, 08:43:11 PM
I added a geophysical paragraph (including a "historical" map of Marienburg) and merged the two previous posts.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (11/04/2014)
Post by: Naitsabes on April 15, 2014, 06:23:09 PM
lovely stuff!

The exhaustive details really bring it to life. however, for chumps like me not living and breathing the recent history of the Empire it can get a bit confusing at times. How about editing the first post with some broad stroke timeline.

- X von sowieso-anderswo ruled from this year to this year
- this year battle of xyz
- Y von silly-willy claimed the throne
- whatnot etc.

and then list the post numbers with the art and details you so carefully pulled together. You must have something like this written up somewhere...unless it's all in your head which would be...scary ::heretic::

just a suggestion, keep it up!
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (11/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 16, 2014, 08:11:45 AM
Good point - I'll get right on it. But not to worry: Warhammer history is confusing, because there are often conflicting sources, which are not always easily integrated into a consistent story. In addition, I am trying to paper over the cracks and fill in the blanks with my own inventions, based on actual history. As such, it is indeed more in my head than on paper: the History is a living document (regularly being edited and re-edited), and, unfortunately, the timeline will have to mirror that.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (11/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 17, 2014, 10:26:41 AM
Following the suggestion of Naitsabes, a chronology of relevant dates and events has been included in the first post, to be updated as the History unfolds.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (11/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 18, 2014, 09:09:38 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

Almost daily messages were being exchanged by courier between the envoys and the Imperial Court. On a night out in town, these couriers were lured by Marienburg agents into a grand tour of taverns, brothels and gambling houses, where they incurred a heavy debt. Marienburg officials duly approached them and, with a mixture of coercion and persuasion, got the messengers to let them read the letters, before they were delivered. Marienburg thought this a great success, but this preview was already part the deception plan, as Wilhelm III had anticipated that something similar was bound to happen.

1. The couriers giving Marienburg a sneak preview of the Imperial diplomatic mail.

(https://i.imgur.com/dsn9l7T.jpg)


Through false dispatches, the Directorate was now fed an unfolding story of a threatening civil war in the Empire. The Elector Counts that had voted for Frederik Untermensch were trying to force Wilhem III into accepting one of them as Rex Remanorum. When he stubbornly refused, they threatened military action. Both sides started raising troops and preparing for war.

Given the extensive Marienburg network throughout the Empire, Wilhelm III and the Elector Counts set the rumour mill in motion to support the deception. Soon the towns and cities of the Empire were buzzing with gossip about an impending war: The Orcs are coming! Idiot, it is not a barbarian Waaagh, but a civil war! Surely, Marienburg will be punished! It is about bloody time they showed those pesky Bretonnians! It is the Border Princes, I tell ya -they won’t know what hit them….



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 247 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (22/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 22, 2014, 02:23:15 PM
Added to the chronology on page 1 a symbolic depiction of the Age of Wars.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (22/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 26, 2014, 02:11:57 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

It was hoped that this deception would allow to start the campaign without raising too much suspicion in Marienburg. The man chosen for this task was Dietrich von Bernau.

1. Dietrich von Bernau

(https://i.imgur.com/t4zcN8Q.jpg)

Bernau was interpreteted as Bären-Au (Pasture of Bears) - hence the Bear as heraldic charge.


Dietrich, a younger son of the Wissenland Baron Toppenheimer, had already distinguished himself in the Waaagh, first in the unsuccesful defence of Nuln, then in Reikland, where he had attracted the attention of Wilhelm III. Dietrich had been involved in the planning of the campaign from the start, and had offered to raise himself a sizeable part of the troops. To lead the campaign, Wilhelm III appointed him to the office of Reichsmarschall.2




1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 02 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
2. Not to be confused with the Reichserzmarschall, an Imperial High Office (Reicherzamt) reserved for the Electors and often more ceremonial in nature.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (26/04/2014)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 29, 2014, 01:17:28 PM
The best lie is, of course, the truth. Marienburg was given correct information about the troop movements, as the displacements of major troops could not remain hidden anyway, and would have been reported by Marienburg traders and agents, although in less detail.

This was the story they could piece together from the dispatches:

(https://i.imgur.com/6abLzOF.jpg)

The "rebellious" Northern Provinces assembled most of their forces near Middenheim.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/EXBTxGh.jpg)

One can discern the banners of Ostermark (twice), Middenheim, Middenland (not quite visible in the back), Hochland, Ostland and Nordland.

2. (https://i.imgur.com/9SEcdOP.jpg)

These had been joined by a small mercenary force from Kislev, attracting much attention, because of its exotic (some alleged Chaotic) armour and appearance. Note the letters DSF on the banner, Divo Sigmare Favente (with divine Sigmar's favour).
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/04/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 30, 2014, 07:41:04 AM
To re-inforce the deception, envoys were dispatched by the 'rebels" to Marienburg with the following vague message: "Change was at hand, and Marienburg would do well to consider which side they were on." To which Marienburg replied, that they would not meddle in the affairs of foreign states. The envoys immediately departed again, seeminly satisfied with the apparent promise of neutrality.

3. (https://i.imgur.com/o2NRXwn.jpg)
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (30/04/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on April 30, 2014, 10:10:32 PM
4. (https://i.imgur.com/XwWqZb3.jpg)

As the main army of the North moved towards Altdorf, a second smaller force departed from Talabheim towards the south.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (01/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 02, 2014, 12:17:23 PM
5. (https://i.imgur.com/GrIWhav.jpg)

As the Northern forces reached the Reik, they found all the crossing points heavily defended by Reikland troops.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (02/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 03, 2014, 11:54:38 AM
The Reikland forces had been reinforced by troops from the south-eastern provinces:
 
6. (https://i.imgur.com/z6uRK4T.jpg)

The new Reichsmarschall, Dietrich von Bernau, leading his troops from Bernau to Nuln.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (03/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 04, 2014, 08:33:14 AM
At Nuln, Dietrich van Bernau was joined by troops from Averland and Nuln itself.

7. (https://i.imgur.com/3r0BD3M.jpg)

The Grand Count of Averland, leading his troops his person, is waiving graciously into the camera. In the background Nuln and the river Reik.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (04/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 05, 2014, 09:39:38 AM
8. (https://i.imgur.com/Ol35kau.jpg)

The Northern troops move down the Reik to circumvent the blocking positions and outflank the "loyalists".
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (05/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 07, 2014, 09:01:09 AM
8a. (https://i.imgur.com/TsmO2xr.jpg)

Not to be outflanked, the Southern forces were shadowing their movements along the other side of the Reik. 


1, 3 & 5: Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 152, 133 &148 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
2, 4, 6-8a: Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 70, 148, 344, 401, 51 & 915 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
The soldiers in picture 2 are troops from Bohemia (capital Prague).
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (07/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 27, 2014, 07:58:50 PM
At this point, the flow of information through the dispatches came to an abrupt en. In accordance with the messages, the Imperial envoys had shown themself increasingly anxious and agitated. The last "leaked" dispatch contained the order from the Emperor that they should try and secure a substantial loan to finance operations against the rebels. When the envoys approached the Directorate with the request, it was flatly refused. To which the envoys replied: "Change was at hand, and Marienburg would do well to consider which side they were on." The Imperial envoys then immediately prepared to leave Marienburg.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/ErCiC6g.jpg)

Note the Dwarfs and Halflings in the foreground, attached to the House of Fooger. The Dwarf House of Fooger is the only non-Human House with a seat in the Directorate, where it ensures the interests of the city's Halfling and Gnome communities.


1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 87 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (28/05/14)
Post by: Naitsabes on May 27, 2014, 09:54:39 PM
great stuff. true gem is the foot note about the halflings. This last picture also shows a common trend in Imperial Paintings, namely how these paintings are idealizing their subjects. just look at the dainty little feet Halfling feet and compare to what you see when you head down to the local pub.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (07/05/14)
Post by: S.O.F on May 27, 2014, 10:27:27 PM
Gnome communities.

Marienburg still have half-orcs too?  :icon_wink:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (28/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 28, 2014, 07:42:28 PM
My mistake - it should have been "Garden Gnome" communities....
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (28/05/14)
Post by: Darknight on May 28, 2014, 08:24:28 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htdvdm7cJnA
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (28/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 29, 2014, 06:07:40 AM
Gnomen est omen.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (28/05/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 21, 2014, 11:47:16 AM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

The Directorate had other, more pressing concerns anyway.  With Neuwuchs (the spring equinox),  the “Oath to Mannaan” was celebrated, one of the two major feasts of Mannaan, the principal deity of Marienburg. The festival "marks the official opening of the trading season and the return of calm seas. The feast consists of two days of parties and boat races, including the famed Marienburg regatta, and concludes with a High Service in the Cathedral of Mannaan. Afterwards, all the seaworthy vessels in the city sail in a gaudy parade past the Archpriest's caravel, anchored beyond Rijkers' Isle, to receive his blessing. During this, subordinate priests led by the Staadtholder recite the Oath, the agreement between the city and its god.1 The festival attracted a huge number of pilgrims from all over the Old World, who tended to linger on in the city after the festival, some for religious reasons, some for business, some for tourism, many simply to recover from their hangovers.

In recent years, it had become also the start of the Lange Vaert (Long Voyage) to Ulthuan. The trade with Ulthuan was the main sources of income for Marienburg, but, since the demise of the Imperial Fleet, Norse and other pirates had become an ever greater threat. To counter this threat, the Directorate had established a yearly convoy system, whereby the remaining warships could serve as protection for the merchant fleet. Of course, the absence of warships diminished the defensive capabilities of Marienburg. A programme to build new warships had been planned, only to be shelved temporarily, as the funds were needed to buy Marienburg’s independence.
Although the departure of the convoy was linked to the festival, the actual date was determined not by religious but practical factors, i.e. favourable winds and currents, and could therefore take place some days before (as indeed in the current year) or after the actual feast.


(https://i.imgur.com/WqkeiVI.jpg)

2. A Marienburg convoy during the Lange Vaert.



1. Ragan, A, Marienburg - Sold Down the River, Hogstead Publishing Ld (1999), p.44.
2. Bartholomaeus Anglicus, Le Livre des proprietés des choses, translated by Jehan de Carlathan (sic), MS Français 136, fol. 26 (XV. century), Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (21/07/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 24, 2014, 04:33:26 PM
To exploit the festivities, Dietrich von Bernau sent an advance force ahead, under the command of Hans von Rechberg. As small element of that force, disguised as pilgrims, was to infiltrate Marienburg, seize one of the gates and allow the advance force to enter the city and hold the gate, until the arrival of the main force.
After the surprise attack by Frederik of Talabheim on Rijker’s Isle, the Directorate had increased  security and vigilance. When entering the city, all weapons had to be given for safekeeping by the City Guard. However, a sturdy pilgrim staff and a good knife should be sufficient for a swift and stealthy operation. And the festivities had put the “ale” back in the alertness of the City Guard.

1. Hans von Rechberg and his men, disguised as pilgrims,arriving at Marienburg.

(https://i.imgur.com/l9rEpqb.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 352 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/07/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 27, 2014, 07:56:52 PM
The "pilgrims" entered the city without being challenged, but as they were about to moor, disaster struck! Their boat hit an underwater pillar and sank instantly. Most of the soldiers could not swim and drowned, including the commander Hans Rechberg. Without leadership, the ones that survived were too few and too shaken to continue the operation. Malicious gossip claims that the accident was caused by drunkennes of the soldiers, either to imbibe courage, or to blend in more realistically with the festivities.

1.  (https://i.imgur.com/0Ix2fbp.jpg)


1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 840 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (28/07/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 19, 2014, 02:04:34 PM
While the advance party waited in vain on a signal, the main force advanced along the Reik. As said earlier, the terrain around Marienburg was unsuited for heavy cavalry or artillery, and the Empire force consisted mainly of infantry, supported by light cannons and light cavalry. Where need be, the infantry was transported through the marshy terrain on specially constructed wagons.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/SBwDn9U.jpg)

Most of the supplies and some heavier pieces of artillery were transported on ship over the Reik.

2. (https://i.imgur.com/gqsswzJ.jpg)]



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 258 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 265(1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Warlord on August 20, 2014, 05:00:40 AM
I really do love what you are doing in this thread.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 20, 2014, 01:08:03 PM
Thank you! I fear, the Second Campaign against Marienburg takes me a bit longer than I anticipated.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Naitsabes on August 20, 2014, 04:58:25 PM
Good stuff!

in the last picture, what are the weird tampon-shaped objects? some weird projectile for the cannon?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 20, 2014, 10:14:13 PM
Good question. The source does not specify what they are. I doubt they are projectiles. Perhaps sacks? Which bags the question: what is the content?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Padre on August 20, 2014, 10:37:25 PM
Content = gunpowder.

To effectively use a cannon you need three basic things: the cannon, the ball, the charge. No ... Four basic things: the cannon, the ball, the charge, the crew. No ... Five basic things: the cannon, the ball, the charge, the crew, and matchord ... and priming powder, and a linstock, and ... oh, you get the idea.

But powder is important. Could be in paper, or cloth - no matter. Once the touch-hole is pricked whatever is holding the powder is holed.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 20, 2014, 10:40:23 PM
Notice the location. I should think, you would want to keep your powder dry.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Padre on August 20, 2014, 10:53:02 PM
Yeah - location is not ideal. BUT the only alternative is not to have any powder. And without powder that makes a mockery of my previous assertion re the necessary three, no four, no five ... you get the idea.

I suppose alternatively they could be bags of swan shot / sangranel / case / burrel / partridge (call it what you will, and those terms are all too late re: RW history)?
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: S.O.F on August 21, 2014, 12:02:02 AM
See that seems like a likely answer but for some reason I'm thinking that the use of powder bags, at least that well prepared in advance, is incorrect with the time frame of the picture (being a 15th century bombard and all). Powder bag usage I thought was a later invention/innovation much like how until the late 17th early 18th though the cannon crew were military men all the train to move, supply, and repair them in the field were non-military contractors.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 21, 2014, 07:21:51 AM
Given that the raft is accompanied by two ships (one with its own, small guns), I should think the powder is stored there, just like the other gear needed for the bombard, but not present on the raft.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 21, 2014, 11:53:12 AM
I found a picture (which I will use later), where the context (on dry land) strongly suggests that these are in fact sacks containing gun powder. Here, the sacks themselves are stored in a wooden box, which makes far more sense (and would do even more so on a raft). 
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Padre on August 21, 2014, 12:28:03 PM
You should have believed me the first time.

What's the point in me being omniscient if no-one ever believes what I say? I tell you, it's wasted on me. I should have picked omnipotence or omnipresence when I was given the choice. The former would have allowed me to make you all believe, even if I was wrong. The latter would have meant I could have tapped you on the shoulder and said 'boo'! (Not entirely sure how that last talent would actually help in the situation but it would be fun.)

When given a multiple choice question and one of the answers is 'bags', always tick 'bags'.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 21, 2014, 02:53:20 PM
Or perhaps it is the case of a good cock coming out of a tattered bag.  :engel:
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (19/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 24, 2014, 09:01:16 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

While building his Army List, Wilhelm III had to deal with two additional restrictions. None of the Knightly Orders had been prepared to offer a significant contribution. Some Grand Masters referred to the terrain, thinking it beneath their  knights to fight on foot; other complained about the lack of preparation time, or claimed to be unavoidably detained for other duties. But it is more likely that the significant financial interests of the Knightly Orders in Marienburg forestalled their participation. Various knights, however, participated on an individual basis, were grouped together under a new banner, and would form the nucleus of what would become the Reiksguard.
A more serious setback was the stubborn refusal of the Supreme Patriarch, Vincent of Bogenhafen, to allow any wizard taking part in the campaign. He claimed that, based on the Articles of Imperial Magic, the Colleges of Magic needed in this case to observe a strict neutrality, at least until it had been established by an independent court that Dieter IV had indeed illegally granted Marienburg its independence. Of course, the fact that Vincent was a close personal friend of Dieter IV and that his elevation to Supreme Patriarch was due to that Emperor’s support may not have been completely alien to that decision. Admittedly, Vincent had also maintained neutrality during the deposition of Dieter IV, but few Magisters would have supported the latter, given the losses the Colleges of Magic suffered during the Waaagh. Others attribute his stance to the "natural" scheming and intrigue of a "Trickster Wizard," because Vincent was a member (and Patriarch) of the Grey Order.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/Fp1asLh.jpg)

The Supreme Patriarch Vincent of Bogenhafen in his study. Miniature from the Imperial Charter by Dieter IV acknowledging Vincent as the Supreme Patriarch. Vincent is still wearing the grey robes of the Patriarch of the Grey Order. Note the grimoires and tomes of Magic on the shelves, and the ubiquitous depictions of Emperor Dieter's coat of arms.


1. Vincent of Beauvais, Speculum historiale, trans. into French by Jean de Vignay (Bruges, c. 1478-1480). Royal 14 E. i, vol. 1, f. 3, British Library, London.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (25/08/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 10, 2014, 02:12:13 PM
The arrival of more troops could not go unnoticed, and soon tidings reached Marienburg, causing panic in the city. As the first Empire troops appeared near the city, the Directorate hastily ordered the gates closed and the walls manned, anxiously awaiting the impending assault. 


1. (https://i.imgur.com/3hA1dNl.jpg)

The Empire Forces took various strategic positions around the city, where they deployed artillery and set up camps. 

2. (https://i.imgur.com/m0U6IWC.jpg)

Note, in the right corner, a chest  with the same oblong objects as on the artillery raft, indicating that these may gun powder bags.



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 88 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 222 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (10/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 11, 2014, 05:00:18 PM
After securing the main accesses to Marienburg, the siege lines were extended to include the whole city from land. As indicated earlier, the siege works were often impeded by the soggy terrain and the many drainage canals.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/GdefrLZ.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p. 242 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (12/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 12, 2014, 07:29:40 PM
Marienburg and its fortifications (the so called Vloedmuur) around the time of Wilhelm III.

(https://i.imgur.com/Tc3FSO0.jpg)

1. View (from the northeast) of the city of Marienburg and its immediate surroundings crossed by numerous drainage canals. This represents the situation before the Great Flood in 2448 and the Riots in 2449. As a result of these events, the Vloedmuur (and indeed a large part of the city itself) was redesigned and extended into its current form.

Legend:



1. Johannes Stumpf, Zürich, (early 16th century), Ms A 1, Bl 28ar, Zentralbibliothek Zürich.
2. The saying is depicted in Pieter Breugel's Flemish Proverbs (1559), Gemäldegalerie, Berlin.
 
(https://i.imgur.com/Mu7tWsE.jpg)
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (13/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 15, 2014, 12:56:00 PM
In several places, the Empire siegeworks consisted of little more than rather crude palisades, which nevertheless proved to be very effective.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/BDesGdK.jpg)

Middenheim state troops repelling a Marienburg sally.


1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 144 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (15/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 16, 2014, 07:56:45 PM
The following drawing by a participant of the Second Marienburg Campaign offers a bird’s eye view of the siege, with the position of the camps of the various Empire forces. From left to right we see above the banners of Middenland, Hochland, Nordland, Averland, Ostland, Ostermark and Talabheim; below the banners of Dietrich von Bernau, Stirland (Haupt-Anderssen),  Talabecland, and Middenheim (with reversed colours). There are no banners of Nuln (the only troops the Elector Count of Wissenland sent), perhaps because these were under direct command of Dietrich von Bernau.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/GJejuaz.jpg)



1. Edlibach, Georg,  Edibach, Ludwig & Usteri, Johann Martin, Zürcher- und Schweizerchronik, p. 100 (1485-1532), Ms A 75, Zentralbibliothek Zürich.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (17/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 20, 2014, 08:24:08 PM
After the initial shock, panic in Marienburg subsided somewhat, since the Imperial forces seemed to prepare for a siege and not an imminent assault. As long as the Empire did not have the ability to blockade the city from the sea, Marienburg could be resupplied and would not be starved into surrender, even if they had to eat fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner.   

However, the numerous pilgrims trapped in the city were an extra drain on resources, which were already running low due to  the festival. Those pilgrims who had arrived with their own ships were, of course, eager to leave as soon as possible, but many could not or would not take additional passengers.  The Marienburg Directorate was particularly worried about the large number of pilgrims from the Empire, as a potential security risk - not without reason, as we have seen. However, they did not want to take any drastic measures, as these pilgrims were often long standing business partners and associates. The Directorate, therefore, sent an embassy to Dietrich von Bernau, with a threefold task: to inquire about terms and conditions to lift the siege, collect intelligence on the opposing troops, and, most importantly, secure free passage for the pilgrims.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/ZuVDWnI.jpg)

Dietrich von Bernau receiving the Marienburg envoys. To the right, the escort of Hochland light cavalry.

Receiving the delegation in the manor where he had set up his HQ, Dietrich von Bernau repeated the generous proposal the Imperial embassy had offered previously. The Marienburg envoys replied that they would refer these terms to the Directorate (both sides knowing the answer would be negative) and then immediately broached the subject of the pilgrims. The Empire was in fact in a similar position as Marienburg: Wilhelm III wanted neither civilians of the Empire nor of foreigners to be needlessly endangered, as this could cause frictions with the Elector Counts and foreign powers, and had instructed Dietrich von Bernau accordingly.  Thus, both sides quickly come to an agreement that all pilgrims could leave the city to return immediately to their place of origin. Specific measures were also agreed to ensure that the pilgrims would be unarmed and that neither side could use the free passage as an opportunity for attack.

2. (https://i.imgur.com/l45ni2w.jpg)

Imperial troops (banners Nuln, Bernau, Middenheim, Ostland and Talabheim) receiving a group of pilgrims (perhaps even the hapless men of Hans Rechberg). Note how a state trooper is selflessly providing comfort to a pilgrim in distress. Ah, the galant men of the Empire!



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 478 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 448 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (21/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on September 28, 2014, 08:18:33 PM
Once Marienburg was encircled by land, Empire forces moved to secure the surrounding hinterland and occupy strategic places.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/WplmJE5.jpg)

Empire forces marching into Klessen. Note the straggling pilgrim drinking from the fountain.


2. (https://i.imgur.com/nnAyh3f.jpg)

To prevent the resupply of Marienburg, cattle from hamlets accessible by sea are driven away. The Westerland villagers are hiding in the woods.


1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 147 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik III, p. 458 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.3, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (29/09/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 05, 2014, 05:00:26 PM
Of vital importance was ensuring control over the fortified places Fort Bergbres, castle Tancred and Fort Solace.

(https://i.imgur.com/boh59kr.jpg)
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (06/10/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 07, 2014, 10:37:26 PM
Situated in the middle of the Gisoreux Gap, at the bridge over the river Ois, Fort Bergbres (i.e. Mountain Gap)  protects the most northern of the Grey Mountains passes. When Marienburg declared its independence, the commander and the garrison of the Border Keep had remained loyal to the Empire,  However, Wilhelm III suspected that, in spite of its embroilment in the Errantry War, Bretonnia might try to exploit the current situation in Westernland. In 1.597, Marienburg had been seized and occupied for five years by Bretonnia, which continued to lay claim on Marienburg and Westernland ever since.  Upon his ascension to the Imperial throne, Wilhelm III had already send some reinforcements to Fort Bergbres. The Border Keep was now further strengthened with troops and supplies to stop or delay as long as possible any action by Bretonnia through the Gisoreux gap.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/dxr2AXy.jpg)

Imperial troops reinforcing Fort Bergbres.



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 225 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (08/10/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 08, 2014, 06:59:50 PM
Tancred Castle lies in disputed territory to the north of Marienburg, and has been changing hands between the Empire and Bretonnia for the last 500 years. Recaptured for the Empire in the last years of Emperor Magnus, its current lord, Bernhard von Gilgenberg, had little trust in ability of an independent Marienburg to support him against Bretonnia. Faced with a superior force, he quickly submitted to the Imperial writ without resistance.

1.  (https://i.imgur.com/moPylkX.jpg)

Bernhard von Gilgenberg negotiating with the Imperial troops at Tancred castle. His fears soon became reality, when Marienburg relinquished the area to Bretonnia, which promptly confiscated all of Gilgenberg's properties. Of course, it might have been a self-fulfilling prophecy, as his actions in the Second Marienburg Campaign will have done little to endear him to the Directorate.



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p. 225 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (09/10/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 14, 2014, 07:53:06 PM
A note on local history: Landrel Barrow.

Not too far from Tancred Castle, one will find Landrel Barrow, “a large earth mound the size of a small hill in the March of Couronne. It is artificial and has a large stone gateway set in the side. Light never seems to penetrate far, and a chilling cold always radiates from it.
Every few years, though the precise time seems to be random, an army of skeletons and zombies marches out of the barrow. They follow the same route every time and completely ignore anyone who leaves them alone. As there are 4,373 of them (they ignored one scholar so much he was able to make an accurate count), most nobles are willing to ignore them. The few who are not meet bad ends, unless their friends can restrain them.
Many groups of adventurers have investigated the barrow. Most have come back, reporting finding nothing but a few cold and empty stone tunnels under the hill. One group found an undisturbed burial chamber, lost one man to the Wight lairing there, and emerged with some treasure. Some groups, however, have simply failed to emerge
.”1

2.
(https://i.imgur.com/kwBXAFg.png)

A careless hunting party has ventured too closely, attracting the attention of the Undead Army from Landrel Barrow.




1. WFRP Knights of the Grail, p. 72.
2. The Hours of Joanna I of Castile (c. 1500), Add MS 35313, f. 158v, British Library.
Title: Re: The history of the Empire as depicted in the art of the time (15/10/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 25, 2014, 02:32:04 PM
The last fortification proved a harder nut to crack. Fort Solace (is) a small port with a population of just 310, built around a lighthouse along the north shore of the Manaanspoort Zee. It is a new town, founded after the destruction of Almshoven and its beacon on the opposite shore during the last Incursion of Chaos [in 2302]. Fort Solace is owned outright by the Wasteland Import-Export Exchange, and its governor is a 'Change employee. Ships reaching the Manaanspoort Sea at nightfall often stop here before making the final journey to Marienburg more rarely, if they plan to skip Marienburg altogether and sail directly to Norsca and Kislev. Fort Solace provides little more than basic services and goods not destined for the city-state are taxed heavily, since the Directorate prefers that all traffic pass through Marienburg.1

It was no real surprise, therefore, that the garrison did not accept even the generous  terms of surrender offered.  It seems, they also counted on supernatural support. First, most of the Empire gun powder got soaked by an extremely unexpected and local rainfall. And whenever the Empire forces tried to storm the castle, lightning and heavy rain showers thwarted their efforts. This obviously led to suspicions that Fort Solace had received help from a Celestial Wizard.


2. (https://i.imgur.com/CdYzGrB.jpg)
   

Fort Solace, viewed from the south-east.
The lighthouse is situated in the tower to the right. The text reads: Von dem grossen Regen der zu Solten mit Zauberei gemacht waret (about the great rain made by magic at Solten).  Solten, the old name for Fort Solace, is derived from the Classical solidus, or solid gold coin, which also led to the word Sold or soldier’s pay. In this case, it probably refers to the taxes levied on ships that did not pass through Marienburg. Later, the port was renamed Fort Solace, from the Classical solacium (consolation), either in a kind of PR move, or reflecting the Marienburg view on those same taxes.




1. WFRP Marienburg. Sold Down the River, p. 9.
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p. 226 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (25/10/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 28, 2014, 09:33:21 AM
That suspicion was increased by the following event. As the Empire forces were starting to settle for a longer siege, a crossbowman, more by chance than ability, managed to kill an enemy in the lighthouse tower. Immediately, rain and winds stopped. Soon, the gun powder was dry again, and the Empire artillery began pounding the walls.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/3lMCb8W.jpg)


Fort Solace as seen from the northeast.
As so often, various diachronic events are depicted simultaneously.



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p. 226 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/10/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 01, 2014, 01:01:24 AM
This apparently demoralised the garrison of Fort Solace so much, that they were prepared to negotiate their surrender. Although everyone in the garrison had heard rumours about a wizard among their ranks, this was emphatically denied by the command, and no solid evidence could be found. In Altdorf, Wilhelm III summoned the Supreme Patriarch, Vincent van Bogenhafen, and the Patriarch of all the Colleges of Magic, and confronted them with the reports of Fort Solace. Vincent of Bogenhafen pointed to the lack of proof, but he agreed to issue a specific decree, together with the Patriarchs, forbidding any Wizard to support the city of Marienburg in any way. 


1.  The surrender of Fort Solace

(https://i.imgur.com/iApZKpC.jpg)




1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p. 227 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (01/11/14)
Post by: Zygmund on November 03, 2014, 08:43:23 AM
Absolutely great stuff here!

-Z
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (01/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 06, 2014, 09:25:57 PM
@ Zygmund: Thank you for the compliment. You are obviously a man of great taste and education.   :::cheers:::
 

With the rear area secured, the next phase of the campaign could be set in motion: to cut off Marienburg from the sea.  Apparently, the Empire could rely more on its Engineers than its Wizards to perform magic.  25 smaller and 6 larger vessels of the Imperial First Fleet sailed from the Reik up the small river Bach to the hamlet of Fauligmere (near Salfen), where they were dragged on dry land. From Fauligmere to the sea, the Imperial Engineers had created a path towards the sea, leveling terrain,  removing trees, plants, and even two houses. The ships were then hauled over long rails of wood,  that were constructed before the ships, and then immediately removed and reconstructed a bit further ahead.  Using 240 oxen, hundreds of men, winches and rollers, the fleet was transported in 15 days 5 miles overland to be finally lowered into the Mannaanspoort Sea. In fact, the fleet literally sailed across the land, because, when the winds were favourable, the ships did set sail to facilitate the transport.1 There can be little doubt that this impressive feat of Imperial engineering inspired the later invention of the Marienburg Landship.


Imperial sapeurs leveling the path to the Mannaanspoort sea.

2. (https://i.imgur.com/ulwn0r8.jpg)


1. This part of the story is based on an even more remarkable but historical feat of engineering: in 1439, Venice hauled a small fleet up the River Adige and across a low mountain range to Lake Garda, in an attempt to support Brescia, besieged by Milanese troops. However, the fleet was destroyed in an ensuing naval battle – according to some, because of the damage caused to the ships by the overland transport. Unfortunately, there seem to be no contemporary depictions, with the sole exception of a detail on the “Almagia map” (some time past 1439), of which I was unable to procure a good digital copy.  In the Palazzo Ducale in Venice, there is a later painting (1584) by Francesco Montemazzano. During the siege of Constantinople in 1453, Mehmed II also had ships hauled over land, however, in less difficult circumstances. 
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 120 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (07/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 07, 2014, 09:44:51 PM
Of course, an enterprise of this magnitude could remain unnoticed. Marienburg soon realised the danger, and decided to act, when the Imperial vessels, like beached whales, were at their most vulnerable. A diversionary attack by mercenary Wastelanders from inland was to draw away the defenders from the ships, while a smaller Marienburg amphibious force would attack from the opposite direction, and destroy as many of the ships as they could. The attempt ended in disaster. Dietrich von Bernau had anticipated precisely such a plan, and had taken the appropriate counter-measures. While the main guard, composed of a Stirland force under the personal command of the Elector Count Ulrich Haupt-Anderson routed the Wastelanders,

1. (https://i.imgur.com/vT1pBbU.jpg)

The banner of the Stirland force still shows the "old" coat of arms of Haupt-Anderson (v. the heraldic note (http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/index.php?topic=47520.msg884465#msg884465))

a specialist Hochland force ambushed the Marienburgers, once they had disembarked from their boats.

2. (https://i.imgur.com/Yb7WFDl.jpg)



Note Rijker's Isle in the distance.


1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p. 296 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 039 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (08/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 10, 2014, 08:29:12 PM
For the first time in 5 years and not to  be repeated for the next 50 years , the Empire had a sizeable naval force in the northern waters, and the arrival of the First Imperial Fleet in the Mannaanspoort Sea indicated a strategic shift of power in the siege of Marienburg.

1. Marienburg's forces being threatened by land and sea.

(https://i.imgur.com/Z9g7ZG4.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p. 239 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 11, 2014, 11:27:17 PM
Having served their purpose, the rails of wood were transported to Fort Solace, where they were used to construct additional naval war craft, in particular the Schneck (slug), an armoured raft, that could hold several cannon and up to 70 men. 

1. (https://i.imgur.com/vL2Oy8K.jpg)

The Schneck being equipped with cannon in the port of Fort Solace. In the background to the left, one can discern Reaver's Point on the opposite side of the Mannaanspoort Sea.



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.242 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (12/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 13, 2014, 11:13:12 PM
In later years, the First Imperial Fleet, which mainly consisted of  river patrol boats, would be no challenge for Marienburg’s navy of seafaring warships, but at present, both fleets were more or less evenly matched.
At that time, Marienburg had at its disposal only the few major warships which had survived the destruction of the Second Imperial Fleet in the Waaagh, and, as we have seen, these had been sent as protection on the Groote Vaert. The city could rely only on its river patrol boats and merchant ships they equipped with guns. Marienburg had an intimate knowledge of the local waters, but this was counterbalanced by the combat experience of the First Imperial Fleet, which had played no small part in preventing the Orcs crossing the Reik during the Waaagh.
Nevertheless, Dietrich von Bernau had decided to take no risks, and had given orders to disrupt the supply lines of Marienburg, whike avoiding a pitched battle with the Marienburg fleet, withdrawing instead towards the shore, where they could be supported by coastal batteries.


1. The Marienburg fleet leaving port to face the First Imperial Fleet

(https://i.imgur.com/TQROJTI.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.294 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (14/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 17, 2014, 11:16:39 PM
Of course, the Imperial Fleet had the easier task: preventing Marienburg from getting food supplies. Fishing was easily disrupted by hit-and-run attacks or firing at long range, and, as we have seen, the cattle from hamlets accessible by sea had been driven away, precisely to prevent the resupply of Marienburg. Forage raids were forced to venture further inland, leaving not only the troops but also the ships vulnerable to attack by land.

1. Hochland troops capturing Marienburg ships

(https://i.imgur.com/1zlRINV.jpg)


Marienburg did have the odd success: at one time, they were even able to intercept an Imperial convoy with food supplies.  But it was clear that, in spite of rationing, food supplies coming in fell far below requirements and that famine in the besieged city was only a question of time.   


2. Marienburg raiders returning with captured Imperial supplies

(https://i.imgur.com/DP9lwiW.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.240 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
2. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.249 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (18/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 24, 2014, 05:30:47 PM
In Marienburg, the food, whether served on plates of gold, brass or pottery, changed from the pleasant to the plain, from the plain to the unappetising, and from the unappetising  to the unpalatable. Admittedly, the Great Houses and the common Marienburger may have had slightly different ideas about what constituted “unpalatable”. The same could probably be said, though, about the common Marienburger and the rest of the Empire. The Directorate indicated to Dietrich von Bernau that they would be willing to negotiate, but only directly with Wilhelm III. Upon receiving word from the Reiksmarshall, the Emperor immediately travelled down the Reik, confident that he could now reunite Marienburg with the Empire.   

1. (https://i.imgur.com/n2Yn0PM.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.106 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 26, 2014, 12:07:45 AM
However, when the Emperor’s heralds trumpeted his arrival, their call remained unanswered and the gates closed:  no embassy left the city, no negotiators appeared on the walls. 

1. (https://i.imgur.com/qJk1CnO.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.109 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (26/11/14)
Post by: Perambulator on November 26, 2014, 04:06:14 PM
 :eusa_clap: Nice work! Keep it up! Don't let this go by the wayside! I'm going to keep an eye on this. Very well done. I can only imagine the amount of work needed to put this together.  :::cheers:::
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (26/11/14)
Post by: Derg on November 26, 2014, 07:49:51 PM
ya this is really interesting never thought someone would commit to something like this, really appreciate all the time you put into it. ill definitely be keeping up
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (26/11/14)
Post by: Baron von Klatz on November 27, 2014, 02:19:45 AM
This is truly inspired!  :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap:

Please continue this amazing project on the Empire's illustrious history.

Tis a shame you use only historical pictures but if you ever need a fill in picture let me know and I can sketch one up. :::cheers:::

Best of fortunes to you friend. :-)
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (26/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 27, 2014, 08:31:39 AM
Thank you all for the encouragement!
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (26/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 27, 2014, 11:19:11 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

The reason for this change of mind (if it had not been a stalling ploy in the first place) soon became clear, when a carrier pigeon from Fort Bregbes arrived with alarming news. A strong Bretonnian force, lead by Enguerrand VII, Sieur de Coucy, had suddenly appeared in  the Gisoreux Gap; having neutralised the bridge watch, they had crossed the bridge over the Oise, and were now moving on the road to Marienburg. They had not attacked Fort Bregbes itself, simply bypassing the Border Keep, but the latter had been in no position to try and stop or even delay the invasion of such a large force.


1. The Bretonnian army emerging from the Gisoreux Gap. 

(https://i.imgur.com/3sBcoPs.jpg)

The Bretonnians are identified by the archaic houndskull bascinet helmets. Because of the helmets (hundsgugel in Reikspiel), the invasion force was also known as Guglers. Note, more to the right, the Lion banner of king Charlen and, to the left. the banner of the commander, Enguerrand VII (or Ingelram in Reikspiel).



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.202 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/11/14)
Post by: Baron von Klatz on November 28, 2014, 12:38:46 AM
Bretonnians eh? I was wondering when they'd show up to take Marienburg.  Now things are getting interesting. :biggriin:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/11/14)
Post by: Hashut on November 28, 2014, 03:13:12 AM
I always kind of ignored this thread- just took the chance to read through it, and it's great! Well done mate  :eusa_clap:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 28, 2014, 05:43:33 PM
Thank you! And anyone, please feel free to point out any errors or inconsistencies (fluff or otherwise)! 
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/11/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 03, 2014, 12:13:05 AM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

Upon this disturbing news, Wilhelm IV immediately started to draw forces together to face the threat head-on. The reported Bretonnian strength was only about 1/3 of the Imperial forces, but most of the latter were needed to maintain the siege. It was clear that the Bretonnian objective was to lift the siege: allowing them to do so was granting them victory, even if they were defeated in the field. 

Although the Imperial garrison at Klessen had been warned, thus was the speed of the Bretonnian advance that they still were taken by surprise and routed.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/LO9aqXe.jpg)


1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.207 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (03/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 05, 2014, 11:13:56 PM
Wilhelm IV hastily assembled the reserves and withdrew as many troops as possible from the siege to face the threat in his rear. Some gaps had to be accepted on the eastern side, as Wilhelm IV did want to weaken the west too much, lest a Marienburg sally tried to combine forces with the Bretonnians. Together with the reserves, this force was about the same size as the Bretonnians. Upon word of the prise of Klessen, he immediately marched towards Lehmburg, where he chose a blocking position in favourable terrain. The next day, the enemy appeared and proceeded to charge without delay. The size of the forces was about equal, their composition could not be more different:  heavy cavalry on the Bretonnian, mainly infantry on the Imperial side.  As we have seen earlier, the soggy terrain of Westerland, intersected by streams and ditches, was particulalry ill suited for heavy cavalry. The Bretonnians Lances forced to stay on firm ground,  were funnelled along the Gisoreux road, unable to deploy their full attack potential. While Hochland spearmen and halberdiers withstood the Bretonnian charge head-on, the other Imperial troops closed in from the flanks. Unable to break the Hochlanders, and about to be routed, the Bretonnians turned and fled back to Klessen.


1. The Battle at Lehmburg

(https://i.imgur.com/IfOXOhr.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.205 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (06/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 08, 2014, 11:08:25 AM
Meanwhile, the Marienburgers attempted a major sally near the Westernpoort. Their attack started by cutting several dykes and opening sluices:  the water in the town ditch rushed down in a torrent, drowning numbers of Imperial troops. Exploiting the disarray, the Marienburgers tried to break through the siege lines, but, after the initial confusion,  the Imperials rallied and held the line. When the reserve force arrived, the Marienburgers were thrown back into the city.

1.  (https://i.imgur.com/iObXQft.jpg)

The Marienburg sally repulsed. In the foreground the corpses of Imperial troops drowned by the torrent. 



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.270 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (08/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 09, 2014, 11:18:52 PM
The Bretonnians had entrenched themselves in Klessen, and were stubbornly defending themselves against the fierce Imperial attempts to dislodge them. However, it would be only a matter of time, before the surrounded Guglers would have to yield.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/xfKnfD8.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.206 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 20, 2014, 11:05:45 AM
But time is money, and the campaign was about to receive a blow from a completely unexpected corner.  A famous Halfling general once said “An army marches on its stomach,” but, ultimately, it runs on money. And, now, that money had ran out.
First, instigated by Marienburg taunts from the walls,  rumours started to spread in the Imperial camp that the Emperor could not pay anymore wages or supplies, creating unrest among the ranks. Then, messengers from Altdorf arrived with dire news for the Emperor:  the vaults of the Imperial Treasury had been cleaned out! There was clearly magic involved, as there had been no signs of forced entry, and the amount of treasure was simply impossible to be transported in one night, let alone without being noticed. The main suspects were three illusionists/Shadow Mages who had attached themselves to a prestigious theatre company,a performing in the Imperial Palace in Altdorf, and had disappeared at the same time as the treasure. 


1. The three mages recommending themselves to the theatre company. 

(https://i.imgur.com/nIKGU2t.jpg)





a. Based on WFRP Sigmar’s Heirs, p. 22: (In 2429) A particularly daring  trio of illusionists, attached to a prestigious theatre company staying in the Imperial Palace in Altdorf made off with a fine selection of treasure from Wilhelm III’s collection. Wilhelm III orders  a mass trial for wizards on charges of witchcraft and consorting with Chaos.

1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.291(1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
 
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on December 24, 2014, 01:44:13 AM
a. Based on WFRP Sigmar’s Heirs, p. 22: (In 2429) A particularly daring  trio of illusionists, attached to a prestigious theatre company staying in the Imperial Palace in Altdorf made off with a fine selection of treasure from Wilhelm III’s collection. Wilhelm III orders  a mass trial for wizards on charges of witchcraft and consorting with Chaos.

1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.291(1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
 
And how exactly is he going to try every wizard in the Empire?! Can he even do that? Considering the Colleges of Magic were founded by his most successful precedessor aside from Sigmar himself.....
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: Baron von Klatz on December 24, 2014, 02:19:05 AM
a. Based on WFRP Sigmar’s Heirs, p. 22: (In 2429) A particularly daring  trio of illusionists, attached to a prestigious theatre company staying in the Imperial Palace in Altdorf made off with a fine selection of treasure from Wilhelm III’s collection. Wilhelm III orders  a mass trial for wizards on charges of witchcraft and consorting with Chaos.

1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.291(1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
 
And how exactly is he going to try every wizard in the Empire?! Can he even do that? Considering the Colleges of Magic were founded by his most successful precedessor aside from Sigmar himself.....

Anger takes precedent over reason. Hopefully he'll be stopped from doing this by his advisors, otherwise the witch hunters and lynch mobs are going to be working overtime.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on December 24, 2014, 02:22:53 AM
a. Based on WFRP Sigmar’s Heirs, p. 22: (In 2429) A particularly daring  trio of illusionists, attached to a prestigious theatre company staying in the Imperial Palace in Altdorf made off with a fine selection of treasure from Wilhelm III’s collection. Wilhelm III orders  a mass trial for wizards on charges of witchcraft and consorting with Chaos.

1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.291(1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
 
And how exactly is he going to try every wizard in the Empire?! Can he even do that? Considering the Colleges of Magic were founded by his most successful precedessor aside from Sigmar himself.....

Anger take precedent over reason. Hopefully he'll be stopped from doing this by his advisors, otherwise the witch hunters and lynch mobs are going to be working overtime.
I know what you mean!! :-(

Assuming GW don't retcon things half to hell again, who're the Emperors since Magnus the Pious? Magnus was succeeded by Leopold of Stirland as I recall, rather than his brother Gunther Von Bildhofen, but after that I'm pretty rusty apart from knowing Wilhelm III is the direct ancestor(i.e. so-many-greats grandfather) of Karl Franz.....
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: S.O.F on December 24, 2014, 02:54:31 AM
Assuming GW don't retcon things half to hell again, who're the Emperors since Magnus the Pious? Magnus was succeeded by Leopold of Stirland as I recall, rather than his brother Gunther Von Bildhofen, but after that I'm pretty rusty apart from knowing Wilhelm III is the direct ancestor(i.e. so-many-greats grandfather) of Karl Franz.....

Though the line of Emperors from Reunification/Magnus' Reforms to present is the most well developed in WFB/WFRP fluff is is very problematic. My own rough assemblage is something like:

List of Emperors from 2306 to present

Magnus von Bildhofen “The Pious”    2304 to 2369
Leopold Unfahiger-Kreiglitz   2369 to 2401
Dieter IV Unfahiger-Kreiglitz   2401 to 2429
Wilhelm III Holswig-Schliestien “The Wise”    2429 to 2458
Mathias IV Holswig-Schliestien    2458 to 2471
Matheus II Holswig-Schliestien    2471 to 2477
Luitpold I Holswig-Schliestien       2477 to 2502
Karl-Franz II Holswig-Schliestien    2502 to Present

Now there is a very good chance that Mathias and Matheus are the same Emperor but with strange conflicting tales from various WHFRP sources spread over many years (many still in the first edition)
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on December 24, 2014, 01:59:15 PM
And how exactly is he going to try every wizard in the Empire?! Can he even do that? Considering the Colleges of Magic were founded by his most successful precedessor aside from Sigmar himself.....

Don't worry: all will be revealed! It is a literal quote from the Sons of Sigmar, but, of course, very succinct. However, the story is not actually developed any further in any WFRP2 source books (as far as I know), but more details can be found in WFRP1 "Realms of Sorcery" (where the theft actually happens in the final days of Dieter IV).

Now there is a very good chance that Mathias and Matheus are the same Emperor but with strange conflicting tales from various WHFRP sources spread over many years (many still in the first edition)

Yes, I will be working on the assumption that Mathias and Matheus are the same (if I ever get that far). Admittedly, my main reason is congruence with the history of the HRE.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 21, 2015, 01:59:52 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

The available funds would last only for a relatively short time. Marienburg, clearly involved in the theft and now supported by Bretonnia, would undoubtedly try and sit the siege out, until the money had run out. This put the current strategy in jeopardy, and the various options that presented themselves were discussed in the War Council.


After long and heated discussion, the last option prevailed, not because it was the best, or even the least worst, but because it did not invoke a veto from one side or another. 

Marienburg too was eager to negotiate. Food supplies were low, the Bretonnian relieve attempt had failed, and the Directorate knew something very important about the lost treasures the Empire did not. As neither side wanted to allow the opponent in its camp, the negotiations were held on boats on the Mannaanspoort Sea. 


1. The negotiations on the Mannaanspoort Sea

(https://i.imgur.com/jzib5DV.jpg)



1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik II, p.273 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.2, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/01/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 28, 2015, 05:39:35 PM
As a result of the negotiations, the two sides concluded the Ewige Richtung (Eternal Compact), which, in spite of its name, had to be renewed every 10 years. The Emperor and Marienburg agreed to end hostilities for now and the future.   The treaty had no consequences for the legal status of any claims to existing rights or privileges. However, the Emperor agreed not to try himself nor to support any attempt by others to enforce these rights except through peaceful means.  Procedures were therefore set up to settle future disputes between the Empire and Marienburg in a peaceful manner.  All Imperial troops and garrisons would be withdrawn from Westerland. Marienburg would support the Empire in case of war with third parties – for a fee; and the Empire would support Marienburg in case of war with a third party – also for a fee. Imperial ships could only pass through Marienburg under strict conditions and heavy tolls. The treaty also laid out the framework for a trade and customs agreement, the details of which were the subject of further negotiations, and which turned out to be quite advantageous for the Empire.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/01/15)
Post by: Zygmund on January 29, 2015, 12:24:07 PM
Use the terrain for your advantage. (Water)

Make sure you can tolerate some losses. (Early battles outside the walls)

Force the enemy to tie its troops. (Accept a siege)

Make others die for you. (Bretonnians)

Hit the enemy where it hurts. (Treasury)

Act strong especially when weak. (Peace negotiations)

And you shall be victorious.

The Art of War by a Marienburger general?

-Z
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/01/15)
Post by: Baron von Klatz on January 29, 2015, 09:46:27 PM
Make others die for you.

The Art of War by a Marienburger general

-Z

I think this might be more accurate. :-P
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (20/12/14)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on January 30, 2015, 11:11:34 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

There was, of course, still the matter of the stolen treasure. The Directorate denied any involvement, but observed cryptically that, according to their information, the treasure had not been stolen - it had just “disappeared”.  Taking this hint, Wilhelm III requested the Council of the Patriarchs to conduct a thorough investigation of the Treasury, which finally discovered the presence of a complex and powerful, but carefully hidden spell. When the spell of illusion was lifted, it became clear that the treasure had never left the Imperial Treasury.a The investigation also revealed that the spell, probably High Elf in origin, was too complex to last very long, and would have dissipated in due course in any case.
The initial relief over the re-found treasure soon made way for a feeling of having been conned. Negotiating with Marienburg now seemed a somewhat hasty decision, leading to an argument between within the Imperial Concil. This was followed by a second row between the Emperor and the Electors over the further use of the money. At the insistence of the Elector Counts, all funds earmarked for the campaign against Marienburg but not yet spent was refunded to them.

However advantageous the treaty, there was no hiding the fact that the Empire had suffered a strategic defeat, and the reputation of Wilhelm III had been diminished. Marienburg, interested in trade relations, did not want to add insult to injury, but Bretonnia had no such qualms.  In its version of the events, the Bretonnian involvement was greatly exaggerated/distorted in order to press their claim over Marienburg. 


1. (https://i.imgur.com/nVfyJYa.png)

This miniature from the Croniques de Bretonnie, l’Empire, l'Estalie, Tilea et lieux circunvoisins is a kind of pictorial summary of Bretonnian propaganda: in the background, the Lady, as symbol of Bretonnia, rises protectively (and possessively!!) over the besieged Marienburg. In the foreground, Bretonnian (under the Lion banner) and Imperial forces (under the Imperial Eagle) clash, while King Charles himself defeats Emperor Wilhelm III in hand to hand combat. Note how Charles is depicted much bigger than Wilhelm.


a. After inventory, it did, in fact, turn out that choice selection of treasure was missing. This was generally attributed to the illusionists helping themselves to some extra payment for their crime.


1. From the Vergilius in the library of Raphaël de Mercatellis (Brugge, 1488), Ms. 9, fol. 244v. St-Baafskathedraal, Gent.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (31/01/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 07, 2015, 12:19:19 AM
Of course, someone had to take the blame for this strategic defeat. Dietrich von Bernau took his share of responsibility and resigned from the post of Reichsmarschall. This selfless act served only to increase further the sincere indignation of Wilhelm III over the conduct of Vincent of Bogenhafen, whom he accused of wilfully sabotaging the campaign. As Supreme Patriarch, he had withheld the support of the Colleges of Magic on dubious legalistic grounds; and surely, it was no coincidence that it had been Grey Wizards who had hidden the funds for the campaign. He gave Vincent and all the Wizards of the Grey Order an ultimatum: swear an oath of allegiance to the Emperor and the Empire, or be arrested and handed over to the infinite mercy of the Inquisition. Any opposition was quickly stifled, after after the Grey College in Salzenmund was burnt to the ground by a angry mob, accusing the Grey Wizards of treachery. Real violence remained limited to Salzenmund (perhaps because of Nordland's  had the bst claim on Marienburg), but there was a strong feeling of betrayal throughout the Empire. Most of the Grey Wizards could not swear the oath fast enough. Only a small minority either left the Empire, or went into hiding, causing rumours of a secret organisation, the College of Lugenheim (Home of Lies), with links to the Cult of Ranald the Deceiver.a
Over the years, the Grey Order would become one of the pillars of the Emperor’s spy network: in recognition, they were given the title “Grey Guardians”, and each Wizard was handed a Sword of Judgement as symbol of the licence to kill in the service of the Empire.


1. Vincent von Bogenhafen offering the affidavits of the Grey Wizards to Wilhelm III.

(https://i.imgur.com/ORFyBAl.jpg)




a. Based on WFRP 1, Realms of Sorcery, p. 56
1. Diebold Schilling, Die Amtliche Berner Chronik I, p.106 (1483), Mss.h.h.I.1, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (07/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 16, 2015, 11:09:44 PM
Digression: Rudolf von Erlach

To illustrate the events in the following chapter, we will use the Erlacher Chronik, which was  published in 2484/5. The Erlachs were a noble family in possession of the town of Erlach, in the south-west corner of the Wasteland (see map above),  and known for its gold mines. It was Rudolf of Erlach who commissioned this historiography, to glorify himself and his family. At the time of the commission, he had risen to become Staadthouder of Marienburg, indeed, he first Staadthouder not to belong to one of the Great Families. This caused some resentment in certain quarters , and, in all probability, the Erlacher Chronik was intended to strengthen his position by underscoring the achievements of the Erlachs for Marienburg throughout the ages.

Not surprisingly, the Chronik is introduced by Rudolf’s Wappentafel: around the central coat of arms of Rudolf of Erlach the blazons of his female ancestors, emphasising his national and international background.

1.
(https://i.imgur.com/Y6uVANv.jpg)


1. Bottom right (heraldic left): Adelheid Haller van Rothemuur (one of the Great Families), wife of Petermann von Erlach (Rudolf’s mother and father).
2. Bottom left: Margaretha de Grasgar, wife of Johann von Erlach (Rudolf’s grandmother and grandfather). The Bretonnian Grasgar family was related to the Dukes of l’Anguille. During the Errantry Wars, the Grasgar died out in the main line, and Grasgar Castle fell to those same Dukes of  l’Anguille, who used it as a hunting lodge, until Duke Taubert made it his main castle and transformed it into a formidable fortification.
3. Top right: Anna de Roelef (one of the Great Families), wife of Ulrich II von Erlach (Rudolf’s great-grandmother and great-grandfather).
4. Top left: N.N. von Kluck (originally Glück, i.e. Luck, hence the shamrock); wife of Burkhart von Erlach, second son of Ulrich I, first Castellan of Erlach. The Counts of Kluck belonged to the High Nobility of the Empire, and Alexander of Kluck led the third Marienburg Campaign. As we shall see, the inclusion of this great-great-grandmother is no accident, but serves to emphasise the loyalty of the Erlach family to Marienburg.
 
At the top, there is an acronym, I A E L, which is usually read as In alto est lux (On high, there is light). Some scholars, referring to Marienburg's trade and commerce, have suggested In alto est lucrum (There is profit on the high sea). However, if we consider the fact that the Erlach wealth was primarily based on their gold mines, the interpretation In auraria est lucrum (There is profit in a goldmine) seems more likely.

In summary, the Wappentafel  depicts on the one (right) hand the Erlach blood relations with the Great Families, and on the left those with Bretonnia and the Empire, the three elements Marienburg’s wealth depended on.



1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.29 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (17/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 17, 2015, 11:52:12 PM
Next, the Staadthouder and his family are depicted.

1. Rudolf von Erlach, holding the Erlach coat of arms, with his sons Burkhart and Johann.
 
(https://i.imgur.com/Dybibfu.jpg)


1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.30 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (18/02/15)
Post by: steveb on February 18, 2015, 09:19:59 PM
Have you seen the Breughel figures where they sculpted figures from painting like these, like the newlywed couple in fron of a bulls eye mirror?  steveb
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (18/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 18, 2015, 10:15:43 PM
I have now.  :icon_wink:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (18/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 18, 2015, 11:24:15 PM
Digression: Rudolf von Erlach (continued)a


1.
(https://i.imgur.com/2u39ZL3.jpg)

Rudolf’s first wife,  Barbara von Praroman, and daughters. The two girls in the back are maidservants, their smaller size indicating their lesser status. While not one of the Great Houses, the Praroman family still held a prominent position in Marienburg, thanks to the wealth from their renowned glassworks. There has been much scholarly debate about the the Praroman coat of arms, whose emblem is the carcasses  of a fish. There is no known Praroman connection to fishing or fish processing. Various scholars identify the carcasses as those of the Grey Barbed Shark (vulgo "Stromfels' Kitty"), symbol of the banned Cult of Stromfels. Those scholars that accept this identification still disagree about the meaning: some think that the symbol implies adherence to the banned cult, others that the carcasses of a dead shark rather indicates the opposite.



a. The pictures are those of the historical Rudolf of Erlach (1448-1507) and his family. Rudolf, a Swiss noble and politician, held a number of civil and military positions for the city of Bern, including from 1479-1507 (with intermissions) the function of Mayor of Bern.

1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.31 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (19/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 21, 2015, 12:06:46 AM
The Third Campaign against Marienburg

The Eternal Compact was soon to be put to the test. Bretonnia expected to be rewarded for her services, and Marienburg accepted that Fort Bregbes would be run jointly with agents appointed by the Duc du Gisoreux. This combination quickly turned chivalry into chicanery and corruption. As a Marienburg travel guide noted: "Travellers more often refer to Fort Bergbres as "Fort Beg-Bribe" since getting anything done requires a 'donation' of guilders or Bretonnian gold sous to the proper official. Upstanding merchants who object to the practice find themselves buried under mountains of paperwork and subjected to excruciatingly slow inspections. Most put up with this only once and thereafter pay the price and pass the cost on to the customer.”1
Bernhard von Gilgenberg, too, had to pay for his loyalty to the Empire by being forced from his lands, as Marienburg ceased Tancred Castle to the Duke of Couronne.

This caused considerable apprehension in the Empire. In response, the Emperor directed the High Court to speedily investigate and settle the various claims disputes over the inheritance of the last baron of Westerland, Paulus van der Maacht. As a result, the claim of the Nordland Elector was validated.  Of course, this was not too well received by the Directorate of Marienburg.

1. WFRP 1 Marienburg Sold Down the River, p. 10.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (21/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 23, 2015, 11:58:22 PM
[Note: I am in two minds about  the order between the events of the second and third campaign, as reversing them may perhaps be more logical. I would be grateful for any comments or opinions on this issue, later on]

Things came to ahead, when Wilhelm van den Nijmenk, the Arch-Lectora of Marienburg, was murdered in bed by his barber Merlet. The motive for this crime remains a mystery to this day. His murderer was quickly apprehended by the Marienburg authorities, sentenced to death, tortured with hot pokers and then quartered. However, the speed of apprehension, trial and execution raised suspicions of a cover-up. Arch-Lector Wilhelm had always taken a conciliatory stance, arguing for a peaceful solution, but had been equally unwavering in his loyalty to the Church of Sigmar. His word carried weight, not just because he was from a Great Family. His death was a severe blow to the sizeable minority that rejected full Marienburg independence.

1. Crime and punishment of Merlet.
 
(https://i.imgur.com/NuCN9a7.jpg)




a. According to WFRP 1 Marienburg Sold Down the River, p. 47, there is an Arch-Lector of Marienburg, although, since independence, the Grand Theogonists have declared the seat vacant. I have always found it unlikely that there would be only two Arch-Lectors in the Empire. In the German speaking part of the HRE around 1500, there were six archdioceses. In this History, I will assume that the Grand-Theogonist is also the Arch-Lector of Altdorf and that Marienburg is, in the terminology of the Catholic Church, sedes vacans in partibus infidelium (a vacant see in the lands of the unbelievers), thus bringing the total number to four, without contradicting existing fluff. 

1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.548 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (21/02/15)
Post by: S.O.F on February 24, 2015, 01:11:11 PM
a. According to WFRP 1 Marienburg Sold Down the River, p. 47, there is an Arch-Lector of Marienburg, although, since independence, the Grand Theogonists have declared the seat vacant. I have always found it unlikely that there would be only two Arch-Lectors in the Empire. In the German speaking part of the HRE around 1500, there were six archdioceses. In this History, I will assume that the Grand-Theogonist is also the Arch-Lector of Altdorf and that Marienburg is, in the terminology of the Catholic Church, sedes vacans in partibus infidelium (a vacant see in the lands of the unbelievers), thus bringing the total number to four, without contradicting existing fluff. 

Hmmm interesting thought. I think I can go with that in truth there are three Arch Lectors and that the Grand Theogonist is also the Arch Lector of Altdorf though that does raise some questions. Being as the Imperial capital moves the Theogonist has as well to be near the Imperial Court and also in the first millennium the Grand Theogonist was based in Nuln for a good part of it, perhaps the title is not as linked to a single see or more likely that the Cult reformed it dioceses after Magnus the Pious's reunification. Side note as I've just checked one of the side bars in Tome of Salvation and the Grand Theogonist does also carry an Arch-Lector title though it is put as Arch-Lector of the West which sounds stupid and that of Altdorf sounds much better.

I do find it hard for Marienburg to have an Arch-Lector though but much of this is based on WHFRP 2 info. The Sigmarite Cult is said to have 2(3) Arch-Lectors and 18 Lectors, which is a nice break down of 6 Bishops under each Arch Bishop (There are also 16 Capitularies, 4 High and 12 normal,  which are special dioceses linked to holy sites or special regions in which circumvent the Cult normal feudal hierarchy and send their tithes directly to the Cult via the Grand Theogonist). If Marienburg had an Arch-Lector beyond a poor breakdown of the dioceses from there there is also not much geography for said Arch-Lector to be the spiritual lord. Much of Middenland and even Nordland are not heavily invested in Sigmarite dioceses, Middenheim fall under the Nordland High Capitular's jurisdiction which in turn means that this region is answerable only to the Grand Theogonist and not attatched to any Arch-Lectorate. 

The other note is that outside the bounds of the Empire Cult of Sigmar dioceses are headed by Theogonists with generally little regard to the actually level in which they govern. I don't think in the wake of Marienburg's secession the Cult would have named the see vacant but would have renamed the position. The stubborn nature of the Cult though would make me think that appointments were made under the proper title but that the Directorate instead names their own Lector under the title Theogonist of Westerland or some such.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2015, 10:12:43 AM
Thank you for the points you raised. There do not seem too many WFRP 2 sources with a bit more detail on the Sigmarite Church in the Wasteland. And, as so often, WFRP 3 seems to have the least details of all. That is why I made due of WFRP 1: as said, the remarks regarding the AL of Marienburg are based on Marienburg - Sold Down the River. Here, the Church of Sigmar has split after independence, between, on the one hand, the Uniates (or Orthodox), loyal to the Grand Theogonist, and  on the other hand, the Reformed Church, loyal to the Directorate, which appoints the AL. The Uniates, mainly based around Kalkaat, are headed by a Lector, as the Grand Theogonists have declared the AL seat vacant.

The existence of AL is Marienburg may not be that improbable. The organisation of the Roman Catholic Church still bears the traces of  2000 years of history, to the extent that, even today, there are titular bishops and archbishops of cities conquered by Islam almost 1500 years ago.  As we have discussed earlier in this thread, Westerland and Nordland seem at one point to have been one big Electorate, and the Arch Lectorate in Marienburg would be another remnant of that original Electorate. It could have been responsible for Middenheim too, but would have lost that jurisdiction after the division of the original Province.

Given that the Church of Sigmar was founded by Johann Helstrum in Reikdorf (later Altdorf), one really should expect an Arch Lector of Altdorf, even if the capital moved later to a different city. I should not think it a problem, if the Grand Theogonist still held the title/function of Arch Lector of Altdorf, even if he resided elsewhere. There is a historical precedent in the Babylonian Captivity (1309 to 1377), when the Popes resided in Avignon, but were, of course, still Bishop of Rome and Archbishops and Metropolitan of the Roman Province. More recently, there is the example of the Patriarch/Archbishop of Pec (the head of the Serbian Orthodox Church) who has never resided in Pec itself, since the Patriarchate was re-established in 1920. 

Speaking about Patriarchs, I suppose that “Arch Lector of the West” is inspired by “Patriarch of the West”, an old title of the Pope (but since 2006 no longer in official use). The title made sense in the Christian world, but does not really fit in the Warhammer world.

I wonder what  the description in the ToS of the role of theogonists “who control Sigmarite concerns in foreign lands” actually means. Are they comparable to papal nuntii? Perhaps not, as Theogonist Gregori Sorgher of Kislev, the high priest responsible for cult affairs in Kislev, is working from Altdorf.  On the other hand, he might still be “in exile” after the Storm of Chaos. 
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on February 25, 2015, 11:25:25 AM
@Fidelis: The singular form is "papal nuncio", so wouln't the plural be ''nuncii''? Also, just because an area was conquered by Islam 1500 years ago doesn't mean it had no more Christians left, e.g. the Holy Land from c. 1400 onwards. When they weren't invading your territory, medieval Muslims were nearly more tolerant than their more modern counterparts - at least when it came to other Abrahamaic faiths...
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2015, 12:43:46 PM
The plural of the English nuncio is nuncios. However, I used the Latin nuntius, pl. nuntii (which I should have put in in Italics).
Regarding the second point: I am talking about defunct dioceses, which live on in name. Not all dioceses ceased to exist, even when conquered - but they ipso facto do not fall into the category of titular dioceses. Most of the titular (arch)dioceses are in North-Africa, the Near East and the Balkans. In most cases, these dioceses did not disappear immediately. For instance, the last reference to the diocese of Carthage (conquered in 698) as a residential see was in 1053.  After all, it took about 500 years, before the Muslims became a majority in the territories they had conquered (which was not a uniform process in time or place). More recently, there are even titular dioceses from Europe and America, which have disappeared as part of re-organisations etc.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: S.O.F on February 25, 2015, 01:42:34 PM
The existence of AL is Marienburg may not be that improbable. The organisation of the Roman Catholic Church still bears the traces of  2000 years of history, to the extent that, even today, there are titular bishops and archbishops of cities conquered by Islam almost 1500 years ago.  As we have discussed earlier in this thread, Westerland and Nordland seem at one point to have been one big Electorate, and the Arch Lectorate in Marienburg would be another remnant of that original Electorate. It could have been responsible for Middenheim too, but would have lost that jurisdiction after the division of the original Province.

Possibly true and perhaps before the Civil Wars much of the north were properly part of the Sigmarite Cults system but after the reunification in deference to the Ulrican Cult, dioceses with little to no Sigmarite followers but only titular heads were dropped and for the relations between cults much of the north put under a High Capitular. The other problem I failed to mention before though is that I'd find it odd that if there were four Arch-Lectors why would only one be left out of gaining Electoral status? Of course one could argue that Marienburg, unlike Nuln and Talbheim was not on Magnus the Pious rally the Empire tour and thus not as connected to the Emperor or that as Magnus offered Elector status to both the Ar-Ulric and the High Priest of Taal (the latter declining) that it was an attempt at being more even than giving all Arch Lectors such status. I mean being that if we look at the HRE example half the Arch Bishops of the German speaking part were Electors. Who knows really, I think your current interpretation is just fine and this is more an interesting discussion of it.

Quote
Given that the Church of Sigmar was founded by Johann Helstrum in Reikdorf (later Altdorf), one really should expect an Arch Lector of Altdorf, even if the capital moved later to a different city. I should not think it a problem, if the Grand Theogonist still held the title/function of Arch Lector of Altdorf, even if he resided elsewhere. There is a historical precedent in the Babylonian Captivity (1309 to 1377), when the Popes resided in Avignon, but were, of course, still Bishop of Rome and Archbishops and Metropolitan of the Roman Province. More recently, there is the example of the Patriarch/Archbishop of Pec (the head of the Serbian Orthodox Church) who has never resided in Pec itself, since the Patriarchate was re-established in 1920. 

Hmmm I wonder if this is another point of inconsistency between WHFRP sources. Forges of Nuln I know states the Sigmarite Cult was founded in Nuln by Helstrum and it has the oldest Sigmarite Cathedral in the Empire. Altdorf became the more powerful seat after the Grand Theogonist began to pursue more secular power during the time of the Drakwald Emperors, spending more time in Altdorf (sometimes capital/closer to Carroburg).

Quote
I wonder what  the description in the ToS of the role of theogonists “who control Sigmarite concerns in foreign lands” actually means. Are they comparable to papal nuntii? Perhaps not, as Theogonist Gregori Sorgher of Kislev, the high priest responsible for cult affairs in Kislev, is working from Altdorf.  On the other hand, he might still be “in exile” after the Storm of Chaos.

I had thought that was due to the Storm of Chaos setting. After work I shall dig out Realm of the Ice Queen and see if there is any more information in there but I had thought it a position of roughly Lector level (the Theogonist of Kislev anyway) that oversaw appointments and the Cult in Kislev (large cities probably having Sigmarite Churches and smaller towns near the Imperial border perhaps having village priests).
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2015, 04:57:21 PM
I do appreciate your comments! If possible, I want to remain close to the existing fluff, and any help to establish events and resolve contradictions is more than welcome.

Hmmm I wonder if this is another point of inconsistency between WHFRP sources. Forges of Nuln I know states the Sigmarite Cult was founded in Nuln by Helstrum and it has the oldest Sigmarite Cathedral in the Empire. Altdorf became the more powerful seat after the Grand Theogonist began to pursue more secular power during the time of the Drakwald Emperors, spending more time in Altdorf (sometimes capital/closer to Carroburg).

I had a look at the Forges of Nuln, and, if it is an inconsistency, it can be explained away. FoN p.6 explains how small Sigmarite cults were established in in the newer parts of Nuln. Helstrum then travels to Altdorf "and soon after, the cult of Sigmar received imperial recognition with an official temple in Altdorf. Back in Nuln, the smaller cells united and founded the first temple of Sigmar on the slopes of the hill holding the Count’s fortress." One could say, the cult was established in Nuln, the official Church in Altdorf. In addition, the reference to the first temple of Sigmar could be read as the first temple of Sigmar in Nuln, unless, of course, there is a reference elsewhere that it is the first in the Empire.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: steveb on February 25, 2015, 06:20:35 PM
when are you going to cover the disaster that befell mordheim?  steveb
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2015, 06:48:59 PM
Although several artworks immediately spring to mind (twin comet included) to illustrate the event, the destruction of Mordheim takes place in the year 2.000 [or 1.999, depending on the source], and thus outside the scope of this history. That said, it could perhaps be the subject of a digression in the future.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: steveb on February 25, 2015, 08:13:31 PM
oh please digress, please.  I think that you would do an excellent job of "mixing"  Maybe start a second thread, could ask for people to create scratchbuilt figures/dioramas to match the painting/explanations-history that you come up with.  I know some breughel works have been done already but I am sure that you could expound upon this with considerable expertise as already demonstrated by this current thread.    steveb
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 25, 2015, 10:43:53 PM
Thank you for your confidence. The idea of matching figures/diorama's certainly has its appeal. I cannot promise that it will happen soon, but I will keep it in mind.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (24/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 28, 2015, 12:30:22 AM
The Third Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

Wilhelm van den Nijmenk was buried in the Marienburg Cathedral of Sigmar, which was closed by the Directorate shortly after the current events. The few that happen to enter by chance or design can still admirer this beautiful stained glass window over his tomb, depicting the Crosier as symbol of his office and his ecclesiastical coat of arms, combining the blazon of the Marienburg Archdiocese with the shells of the House of van Nijmenk. The dates given are those of his life in office.

1. (https://i.imgur.com/6h6Xy9q.jpg)




1. Coat of arms of Guillaume de Monthonay, Bishop of Lausanne, who was murdered in 1406, Château Saint-Maire, Lausanne (text modified).
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/02/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 11, 2015, 11:16:31 PM
Suspicions over the murder of Wilhelm van den Nijmenk grew, when the Directorate grasped the opportunity to bring the Church under its control and brazenly and  illegally interfered in the succession of Wilhelm van den Nijmenk. Because of his age, Wilhelm himself had requested the Grand Theogonist to appoint Lodewijk van Grimpengratz as coadiutor cum iure successionis (Arch Lector coadjutor with the right of succession). Lodewijk’s main task as coadjutor had been the church administration and pastoral care for the Archdiocese extra muros (outside the city walls, i.e. Westerland and Nordland), relieving Wilhelm from remote and burdensome travels through often inhospitable terrain. Like Wilhelm, he was known to be unwavering in his loyalty to the Church of Sigmar. On hearing the news of Wilhelm’s death, Lodewijk, who happened to be in Kalkaat, immediately left for Marienburg, only to find the gates closed to him by the Directorate!

1. Lodewijk van Grimpengratz before the closed gates of Marienburg. 

(https://i.imgur.com/5f86bKh.jpg)


1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.190 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (12/03/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 15, 2015, 11:18:19 PM
The Directorate claimed to have evidence that Melet might have been part of a wider conspiracy, and that Lodewijk’s security in the city could not be guaranteed. A claim many in the Empire and Marienburg assumed to be true – but about a conspiracy by the Directorate! While Lodewijk was waiting in vain to be granted entry, the Directorate was trying to bribe and bully the canons of the Cathedral Chapter into replacing Lodewijk by a candidate – any candidate – in favour of independence.

According to the Codex Iuris Canonici Sigmari (Code of the Canon Law of Sigmar), the election of an Arch Lector is the prerogative of the canons of the Cathedral Chapter, although the other clerics of the archdiocese have a consultative voice and the right of consent. In principle, therefore, the Chapter could decide to ignore the coadjutor and elect someone else. However, Canon Law also stipulated that no election was valid unless and until confirmed by the Grand Theogonist. Furthermore, the Arch Lector elect needed to be ordained by at least one Arch Lector in function.

In spite of the threats and promises, the majority of the canons rejected the Directorate’s interference. I was also clear that there was no chance of consent for such a move from the clergy extra muros. But even among the Sigmarite clergy, there are men whose faith is outweighed by their ambitions and desires. The Directorate found such a man in Otto von Sonnefurt, Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Marienburg. Otto saw a chance of realising his hopes of succeeding Wilhelm van den Nijmenk, which had been dashed, when Lodewijk was appointed as Arch Lector coadjutor. As Dean of the Cathedral Chapter, Otto organised an impromptu election, at a time when only the “Marienburg minority” happened to be present – which duly elected him as new Arch Lector.  Obviously, the Directorate immediately recognised this completely illegal election. For the Directorate, Otto von Sonnefurt was the perfect candidate, because, as a Wissenlander, he had no real connections or power base within Marienburg and the Westerland, and would be therefore dependent on the continued support of Directorate.


1. (https://i.imgur.com/uHsTuNp.jpg)


On the left, Grand Theogonist Nicolaus appoints Lodewijk van Grimpengratz as Archilector coadiutor cum iure successionis ; on the right the illegal election of Otto von Sonnefurt by a "rump" Chapter.




1. Diebold Schilling the Younger, Luzerner Chronik (1513) Zentralbibliothek Luzern, depicting the Konstanzer Bistumstreit (1474-1480) on which the current story is loosely based.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (16/03/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 17, 2015, 11:01:27 PM
When the Provost of the Chapter and the Chancellor of the Archdiocese vehemently protested against this flagrant breach of Canon Law, Otto had them arrested by the Directorate on charges of sedition and witchcraft.

A note on ecclesiastical heraldry

As shown in the picture above, the election took place  hidden away in a lateral chapel of the cathedral. Later, after the schism with Altdorf had occurred, Otto von Sonnefurt would place his coat of arms on the keystone of the ribbed vault of the chapel, no doubt symbolising himself as the keystone of the so-called Reformed Church of Sigmar.

1. Otto von Sonnefurt's coat of arms.

(https://i.imgur.com/1W26FuL.jpg) 

Quartered, 1 and 4: Argent, a cross gules; 2: Azure, the sun in his glory argent on ford; 3: Or, in pale three lions passant gardant sable; for a Crest an Arch Lector’s Mitre Or and Azure.

A Reformed Church needs a reformed coat of arms. In the quarters 1 & 4, we see the new coat of arms of the Reformed Church Archdiocese of Marienburg – reversing the old colours, and now suspiciously similar to the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Altdorf. An indication, perhaps, that Otto harboured even higher ambitions? The second quarter contains the canting (i.e. alluding to the name) arms of Sonnefurt, and the third quarter Otto’s family coat of arms, with the (Wissenland) lions reversed in heraldic courtesy to the coat of arms of the archdiocese.

The old coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Marienburg continued to be in use with the orthodox Sigmarites, even if the see remained vacant.


1. Coat of arms of  Otto von Sonnenberg, Bishop of Konstanz (1474 /1481 bis 1491), and one of the contenders in the Konstanzer Bistumsstreit. Church of St. Moritz, Hallau (Kanton Schaffhausen), Switzerland. 
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (18/03/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 19, 2015, 12:48:48 PM
It seems approriate to add here the coat of arms of the other archdioceses, as depicted in the Armorial of Cornrad Grünenberg.


1. (https://i.imgur.com/wtxLFRZ.jpg)


From right to left (in order of precedence): the Archdiocese of Altdorf, Nuln and Talabheim (the charge of the latter symbolising the Talabheim crater). All three bear not only a mitre, but also a helmet, indicating their status as ecclesiastical Electors.


1. The coats of arms of the Archdiocese/Electorate of Trier, Cologne, and Mainz (right to left). Wappenbuch Conrads von Grünenberg (ca. 1480) p. 12, BSB CGM 145, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek. München.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (19/03/15)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on May 18, 2015, 02:43:33 PM
ANy chance of an update for this soon? It was quite interesting.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (19/03/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 19, 2015, 11:18:45 AM
Thank you. I have finally decided that it would be better to inverse the campaigns, which needs some rewriting. I had planned to do that in one go, merging all the previous posts, but that would take some time. It is easier to do piecemeal, and finish the third (now second) campaign, as long as you do not mind the resulting inconsistencies. That said, anyone familiar with Warhammer fluff should not really have a problem.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (19/03/15)
Post by: Baron von Klatz on May 20, 2015, 10:44:33 PM
That's great to hear, this history of the Empire you've compiled is fantastic!  :smile2:

I also really like that coat of arms you posted for the archdioceses, the designs are top-notch.

(On a more humorous note, that coat of arms also looks like the bishop hat and knight helm are talking to eachother.)

From left to right: Bishop hat: Hey, hey! Want to know something?
                                  Knight helm: .... (just ignore him)...

                                Bishop hat: Hey! Hey! Hey, are you listening?
                                Knight helm: (Grrr)Ok, what?

                                Bishop hat: Nothing...
                                 Knight helm: Seriously!?
 
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (19/03/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 28, 2015, 06:49:53 PM
Looks like it, doesn't it.

The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

Lodewijk van Grimpengratz immediately appealed to the Grand Theogonist, who, unsurprisingly, confirmed his investiture as Arch Lector of Marienburg.  The Grand Thegogonist also issued the bull Ad Compescendos in support of Lodewijk.

Quote
Ad futuram rei memoriam. Ad compescendos conatus nepharios perversorum qui dei  timore postposito suaque ducti concupiscentia ecclesias presertim cathedrales sine canonico titulo inuadere et occupare presumunt, tanto magis nos decet oportuno remedio prouidere quanto peramplius tendūnt  in diuine maiestatis offensam apostolice sedis auctoritatis contemptum et scandalum plurimorum. Si quis  aūtem hoc attemptare persumpserit indignationem. omnipotentis dei et beatorum apostolorum eius se nouerit incursurum.a
 

Translated from the Classical, this means:

Quote
For future memory. To curb the nepharious attempts of the perverted individuals who, having put aside the fear of our God and led by their burning desire, presume to invade and seize churches, especially cathedrals, without canonical title, it is fitting for us to provide a remedy in ths time of need, even more so as they have given utmost offense to the divine majesty, shown comtempt for the authority of our Apostolic See, and created a scandal for many. But if any man presumes to attempt this, let him know that he will incur the wrath of our almighty God and of his blessed apostles.


1. Grand Theogonist Nicolaus V promulgating the bull Ad Compescendos

(https://i.imgur.com/4NnCYOK.jpg)



a. Text of the papal bull "Ad compescendos" by pope Sixtus IV in 1475, regarding the election of the bischop of Konstanz.
1. Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.581 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/05/15)
Post by: Naitsabes on May 28, 2015, 08:16:26 PM
well, the pictures don't work as well for me with the church-related stuff. too christian (crosses and hair) not enough Sigmar (hammers and baldness). I imagine the latter would be hard to find. but, the text is as entertaining and informative as I've come to expect of this thread. your efforts are much appreciated.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/05/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on May 28, 2015, 08:34:38 PM
Thanks. Of course, the cross is in fact a Sigmarite symbol, representing the four wind directions and thus the (ultimate) extent of the Sigmarite Empire.  The source books also make clear that there is a division of labour within the Sigmarite Church between the more military and more pastoral side. But fear not! Lodewijk will soon don his armour.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (28/05/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on October 24, 2015, 10:16:59 PM
The Second Campaign against Marienburg (continued)

With the bull Ad Compescendos in hand, Lodewijk van Grimpengratz appealed for support throughout his diocese. Many of the faithful  flocked to his cause, but, unsurpisingly, the main military support came from the Elector of Nordland, who saw this as an opportunity to bolster his claim to the Westerland. 


1. [(https://i.imgur.com/jsfeMQd.jpg)

Lodwijk van Grimpengratz receiving the support of the Nordland Elector. Note that the Nordland banner at that time only contained the depiction of a sea eagle. The now familiar galley was added to the Nordland coat of arms after Dietershafen became the seat of the Second Imperial Fleet.


1 . Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.482 [modified] (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (25/10/15)
Post by: Zygmund on October 29, 2015, 08:22:22 AM
Nice to have this back. :)

-Z
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (25/10/15)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 10, 2016, 04:29:13 PM
In this way, an army of about 7.000 men was mustered.  While the core of the army was made up of regular Nordland units, the bulk consisted of Westerland militia. The army lacked coherence between such disparate units. Upon the news that Lodewijk was marching towards Marienburg, the Directorate assembled the City Militia, reinforced with mercenaries, and the two armies met at Salfen. What the Sigmarite army lacked in structure, it made up for in zeal. Inspired by Sigmar, Lodewijk led the faithful to victory. 

1. The battle of Salfen

(https://i.imgur.com/IqhMh1z.jpg)


1 . Diebold Schilling, Spiezer Chronik , p.516 (1484/5), Mss.h.h.I.16, Burgerbibliothek, Bern.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: RE.Lee on July 16, 2016, 07:49:51 AM
Still amusing, keep it coming!  :biggriin:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 18, 2016, 08:26:02 AM
Thank you. The destruction of WFB caused me to put the whole project into question, but I guess, I should at least try to finish the reign of Wilhem III.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on November 22, 2016, 09:20:46 PM
Make others die for you.

The Art of War by a Marienburger general

-Z

I think this might be more accurate. :-P
Or like what Patton said; "It's not your job to die for your country; it's your job to make the other poor bastard die for his!"
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Konrad von Richtmark on March 16, 2017, 11:25:29 AM
I just finished reading through this topic, and would like to express my utmost appreciation of it  :happy:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Zak on March 16, 2017, 03:39:46 PM
wow is right  :::cheers::: :::cheers::: :::cheers:::
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on March 17, 2017, 09:27:32 AM
Thank you both. I promise I will continue this eventually (cross my heart and hope to die).
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on March 21, 2017, 07:15:26 PM
Thank you both. I promise I will continue this eventually (cross my heart and hope to die).
Please do; I, for one, will certainly keep reading this....
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 09, 2017, 04:52:59 PM
For those not interested: I had just finished the next installment, when - you know. So, I am going to re-image the previous posts first.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on July 09, 2017, 04:57:59 PM
For those not interested: I had just finished the next installment, when - you know. So, I am going to re-image the previous posts first.
Hmm, you had changed the imaging style? Or are you referring to GW killing off WHFB....?
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 09, 2017, 05:00:02 PM
It is rather Photobucket that changed the imaging style...
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Noble Korhedron on July 09, 2017, 05:04:11 PM
It is rather Photobucket that changed the imaging style...
Oh, right; my bad.....
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (10/07/16)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 09, 2017, 10:19:04 PM
No, no, their bad...
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (being re-imaged)
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on November 26, 2017, 08:55:17 PM
Took me much longer than anticipated, but all the pictures are back now.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: Konrad von Richtmark on November 26, 2017, 10:16:09 PM
 :eusa_clap:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time (being re-imaged)
Post by: Padre on November 26, 2017, 10:34:19 PM
Took me much longer than anticipated, but all the pictures are back now.

Tell me about it. I am only now almost up to date on my new website with the campaign stuff. Mind you, it was around a 1000 pictures I think!
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: GamesPoet on November 26, 2017, 11:03:29 PM
Very good to see this returned to its former glory. :icon_cool: :::cheers:::
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 15, 2018, 09:15:35 AM
It seems, photobucket found and closed the loophole.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on February 15, 2018, 04:42:31 PM
Strange - now it seems to work again. I will go full imgur anyway.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: KTG17 on May 20, 2019, 06:41:44 PM
Jesus Christ. I am new to Warhammer and know very little of the fluff as I am still trying to digest the rules, but this thread is f'in amazing. Totally wrapped up in the art and the description as if it really happened in real life.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: GamesPoet on July 17, 2020, 11:37:31 AM
Forgot how good this thread is. :icon_cool: :::cheers:::
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on July 21, 2020, 09:07:35 AM
Thank you for the accolade. I hope to continue it some time soon.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: GamesPoet on July 21, 2020, 09:10:26 AM
Looking forward to it! :::cheers::: :icon_biggrin:
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: wdv331 on August 05, 2020, 04:09:22 PM
This is an excellent project and is very inspirational as well! My only question is where are the sea elves? Most importantly in The Battle of Grootscher Marsh, which was the famed battle of the third campaign to retake Marienburg the Imperial army is soundly defeated by a combination of the remaining army of the Westerland, Many companies of mercenaries and most importantly the fell magics and warriors of the sea elves, a victory that is so complete that Wilhelm nor any future emperor would ever again try to directly subjugate Marienburg back under Imperial rule by straight force of arms.

Also this quote on Dieter's fate from WFRP 'Sigmar's Heirs' " To avoid civil war after the defeat of an Imperial Army outside Marienburg, the new Emperor Wilhelm III recognised the Wasteland’s independence and made Dieter the Grand Duke and Elector Count of Talabecland, from which he detached Talabheim in a manner similar to Nuln." contradicts the house arrest he is placed under in this beautiful story.

This truly a god tier project btw!!
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: Fidelis von Sigmaringen on August 06, 2020, 07:38:29 AM
Thank you. I am glad you like it.

The Battle of the Grootscher Marsh is yet to come, and a sea elf will have a major role to play. That said, I was already planning to change the chronology of the campaigns, with what is now the Second Campaign becoming the Third and vice versa

Regarding Dieter: I am aware of that. As pointed out before, Warhammer fluff is often inconsistent and even contradictory. One of the reasons is that there were fundamental changes between WFRP1 and WFRP2, but these were not always followed though in all publications. Sometimes, the fluff simply does not make any sense. The scenario given here is my personal attempt to to paper over the many cracks (or rather chasms) in the fluff.
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: wdv331 on August 07, 2020, 01:24:32 AM
Great explanation Fidelis! And for what it's worth I like your chronology of events much better!! Although I would not switch the second and third campaigns as Grootscher March seems like a more definitive end to the hostilities as it is such an overwhelming Marienburg triumph, it also just makes more sense as it would have proven to the Emperor that taken back Marienburg was more trouble than it is worth.

(PS if you haven't read grimblades yet I highly recommend it as it is all about Grom's invasion and Wilhelm's rise to power/the throne)
Title: Re: The History of the Empire as Depicted in the Art of the Time
Post by: S.O.F on August 07, 2020, 02:57:11 AM
(PS if you haven't read grimblades yet I highly recommend it as it is all about Grom's invasion and Wilhelm's rise to power/the throne)

Fidelis is a strict constructionist, Black Library works are off the table. It is the key point he and I differ (on Warhammer World interpretation) though I highly appreciate his work.